1. 1

    I’d use OSSC, with output connected to an HDMI capture device.

    1. 3

      I can’t see anywhere on the OSSC wiki that says it supports 1024x768 at 75 or 72Hz, which I’d need here. Do you know differently?

      1. 2

        I use it with not just my Amiga computers, but also old PCs and the Wii.

        As I understand it, it does handle 720p and 1080i input well.

        I’ve used 1024x768 no problem, but VGA-style (from my 386), which I believe is 70Hz-ish. I do not know how it handles vertical refreshes over 70Hz, but my guess is that it’s fine, as, same as screens, the clock that matters is the line (horiz) clock (in kHz).

        This is the ADC chip used: https://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tvp7002.pdf

        Page 14 has a nice table of resolutions and clocks that are supported for sure. This includes 1024x768 at ~85Hz. I do not know, however, if the FPGA will handle it on the other end of the ADC.

        My advice would be, if you can afford one (at around 100€ it is dirt cheap and extremely high value), to just get one and put it to the test. I love mine, and can’t recommend it enough.

    1. 6

      This made me smile. As someone who used csh intermittently in the ’90s (Until I started using OpenBSD ~2.2 or 2.3 in ’98 for a couple machines that were mine, I used whatever the local BOFH made available and that was that…) and tcsh for most of the ’00s.

      I have to say, though, I didn’t script it much outside of dot files. For anything that might ever see a run outside my personal systems, the shebang was always bourne. For interactive stuff + a great collection of dotfiles, it was my favorite.

      1. 1

        I write a lot of csh scripts personally, but that’s from using tcsh and the original csh since the 1990s. I’m still a tcsh user.

      1. 5

        This is kinda crazy impressive. I’m surprised he was able to get it working.

        1. 5

          A couple years ago I took the released source code of John Calhoun’s game Glypha III and ported it forward to PPC / Carbon / OS X / Mach-O / x86: https://github.com/jjuran/glypha3-fork

          It’s definitely not a trivial process (and there are various gotchas along the way), but it’s doable with enough effort.

          1. 3

            Wow. I had no idea he released his code. You have just made me want to port his glider game to linux. As someone who dabbled in mac game programming in the ’90s, it makes me really happy that he released his source.

            1. 1

              The old Mac game I want to do more work with is ZeroGravity, which also has source. I played that incessantly on my friend’s dad’s Mac Plus in 1988.

        1. 1

          A minor, inconsequential quibble in this article: Open Transport was certainly deprecated in 10.4, but wasn’t actually removed until 10.9.

          1. 12

            Pretty much every release since Snow Leopard has (rightfully) received a fair amount of criticism. Things generally seem to get better at the end of the cycle after a few dot releases.

            If anything, this shows that Apple cannot handle the yearly release. I think many Mac users (me included) would be very grateful if they moved to a 2-3 year release cycle as before. That doesn’t mean that there can’t be new features in the meanwhile, but just ship them when they are ready.

            I understand that they want to show off features at some keynote every year. But this is killing macOS as a platform. Plus the keynotes are very crammed anyway, given the number of platforms that they have now (iOS, macOS, iPadOS, watchOS, tvOS).

            1. 4

              People say “go back to 2 year release cycles” but continuous releases would probably be much more effective at shipping less buggy software.

              The idea of shipping a bazillion changes all together is anathema to modern software development, and making that window even longer isn’t going to make things nicer. I know why they do the yearly cycle (marketing pushes), but perhaps they should consider the damage it does to the brand to just have a broken OS all the time, and adopt strategies that make things up to date while not having a billion bugs`

              1. 2

                People say “go back to 2 year release cycles” but continuous releases would probably be much more effective at shipping less buggy software.

                I don’t know, continuous releases make it harder to introduce large architectural changes and get them properly tested. Unless you introduce something similar to Windows fast and slow rings (and get enthusiasts to run them).

                but perhaps they should consider the damage it does to the brand to just have a broken OS all the time, and adopt strategies that make things up to date while not having a billion bugs`

                I fully agree! At this point it would even be better if they didn’t update macOS at all, besides reliability and security fixes, than the yearly mess that is dumped on users.

                1. 2

                  I don’t know, continuous releases make it harder to introduce large architectural changes and get them properly tested.

                  My gut feeling is to just not do large architectural changes. Figure out how to make them small and incremental instead. Takes longer, except you’re not spending a bunch of time poking at a system randomly because it’s impossible to reason about the scope of change.

                  This is an easy position for me to take from where I am sitting, though. Sometimes bandaids have to be taken off. But…. I dunno, I feel like software engineers tend to generate a lot of unforced errors that end up turning into “needed rewrites of this component”.

              2. 1

                Given (as this article points out) how many users can’t yet upgrade, maybe the pause year should be this year.

                But more likely Apple says, “you get two pause years [of updates], so suck it up.”

              1. 5

                Given APFS’s issues with spinning disks, it does seem rather crummy that Apple still sells these as a configuration. It doesn’t look like there are many dials to twiddle to fix that from the OS side, either.

                1. 3

                  Agreed, but they don’t seem to care about the experience. For years, they have been selling non-Retina MacBook Airs, even though they optimized the default font rendering for HiDPI, making fonts look atrocious on new MacBook Airs. They still sell MacBooks Air/Pro with 128GB SSDs, which are basically unusable given the current size of the OS and a minimal set of applications.

                  When I bought my first MacBook (2007) you could buy any ‘low-end’ model and the experience would still be awesome with the latest macOS. Now the Mac to be optimized for Apple’s margins and not the user experience. This is in stark contrast to the iPhone, where a 5 year old 6s still works great with the latest iOS, and every model that is still sold will have a butter-smooth experience.

                1. 4

                  It’s always “not x86 week” in this house.

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                    Server logs and AWK.

                    No JS. No tracking. No software to run. Free.

                    1. 4

                      Another +1 for server-side. I use a log analyzer I wrote myself.

                      1. 3

                        +1 for serverside tracking.

                        I started using honeycomb.io for general ‘what is happening in production’ queries, but it’s also been really useful for things like ‘how many distinct browser/remote ip combinations hit the site in a day’.

                        Plus, tracker blockers ban most client-side analytics; doing it server-side avoids that source of systematic distortion of your numbers (although it also introduces a different systematic distortion from our CDN).

                      1. 3

                        The hero image looks like something out of Halo, even though it’s a real place.

                        It certainly is remarkable how much Microsoft silently crammed into Trident, and yet very little of it I ever heard of, let alone actually used or shipped.

                        I did, and do, find it noteworthy how little of this is in Tasman (on Mac IE).

                          1. 13

                            There are a bunch of comments on HN about why this submission hit the front page and then left the front page. People are arguing over whether it was users flagging it, or because it had more comments than up-votes, or moderator action. A minute ago it was marked [flagged], now it’s not.

                            Something I really like about lobste.rs is that there is a moderation log. It is just much more honest and transparent, and it shows more respect for the user base.

                            1. 8

                              This comment is hilarious:

                              And HN is arguably better for not being invite-only.

                              I never felt accepted over at HN. Many of my comments eventually would get shadowbanned for no known reason. They also tend to ignore my requests through email.

                              Lobsters on the other hand is simple, and I had no trouble getting an invite and participating here without any undocumented moderation censorships happening behind my back.

                            1. 5

                              What are some other reasons folks prefer us to the orange site?

                              1. 9

                                This isn’t an “other” reason, but I like most that there is some level of explanation required on downvotes. I think this makes people more willing to engage even if they might be a little more controversial (the invite-only policy helps control the really wacky stuff). That said, I think there are some users who equate “I disagree with” with “incorrect,” which I disagree with and is incorrect. I’ve always had the policy that I simply won’t upvote something I think is wrong; I’ll only downvote something I know is wrong.

                                Aside from that, though, it’s really the high S:N that keeps me coming back. I’ll glance at Orange now and then but I’m not even logged in anymore most of the time.

                                1. 3

                                  I agree with you - it’s a great idea but I wish it wasn’t so in your face. There are many bullshit down votes on lobsters and they still have huge negative connections event hough they are clearly wrong. Take a look at this submission as a prime example.

                                  1. 1

                                    Not everyone agrees on correct and incorrect. Things that may appear obvious to you and things that may appear obvious to someone else can be completely different. If you’re getting a lot of incorrect votes, and you think you’re unambiguously correct, perhaps there’s room for a discussion for either you to learn a valuable new lesson or for them. Either way a incorrect downvote is probably better than a flamewar.

                                    1. 1

                                      I haven’t participated in many “flame wars” on lobsters. I don’t generally find that to be the character of discourse here.

                                      Clearly that mechanism works for you, and it’s in the code, so more power to you and in future when I find myself thinking “whiskey tango foxtrot?” about an Incorrect in a case where assigning factual incorrectness seems impossible to me, I’ll politely message in hopes of getting a clue :)

                                  2. 2

                                    Totally agree. This post is the first I’ve ever voted off topic on here. I think people are WAAAY too fast & loose with Troll, Incorrect, etc.

                                    However that’s a very small quibble in an otherwise great big pile of satisfaction I have around this place :)

                                    1. 1

                                      The incorrect flag is often the alternative to a unnecessary discussion without meaningful resolution :). While I get that some people want to duke it out (myself included), it often just clogs up the comments.

                                      1. 1

                                        I don’t agree. I see it being used in cases where factual correctness would be nearly impossible to determine. When it’s used to call out an actual factual inaccuracy I’m all for it, but sometimes I think people use it as a passive agressive “I think your comment is full of crap” signalling mechanism, and I’m not wild about that.

                                        1. 1

                                          Is that better than a 30 post argument back and forth where neither are satisfied because the outcome is probably not fully knowable?

                                          1. 2

                                            I don’t personally have that problem very often. Once in a while I fail to catch myself, but I try to take it to private message when the back and forth counter starts to tick up.

                                            I suppose I could and should do the same with the incorrect thing as well.

                                    2. 2

                                      I have a downvote on one of my comments which is expressing an opinion, and the reason for a downvote was “incorrect”. There’s no way for me to contest or countermoderate, so I will disregard the voting system entirely. Downvotes feel the same as reddit.

                                    3. 8

                                      Mainly for me it is the technical signal:noise here is much better than on HN. While I appreciate the industry relevance of stories about such-and-such company’s IPO, or such-and-such CEO’s being fired, it’s not what I go to a tech aggregator to read. I prefer the densely concentrated technical content of lobste.rs to the broad mix of HN.

                                      Not to mention the comments… reading HN comments is usually painful, while the comments here are insightful and civil.

                                      1. 7

                                        There’s a few extra features here that go a long way, but not too many that it pollutes the main features. These extras go along way for me

                                        • reply notifications
                                        • preview
                                        • messaging
                                        • sane formatting
                                        1. 4

                                          I’ll add messaging can help keep down the site noise, too. I might use a message if it’s a compliment or something I’m pretty sure only benefits the person I’m replying to.

                                        2. 6

                                          What are some other reasons folks prefer us to the orange site?

                                          I can easily quote the previous reply in a readable way. I appreciate that HN predates Markdown, but some more formatting would be very helpful. Might seem like a small thing, but writing on HN can be somewhat annoying.

                                          Also, stories tend to perform more consistently here than on HN (example). On HN it’s a bit of a gamble, the same story can get 1 upvote or 400; you never know.

                                          1. 4

                                            I appreciate that HN predates Markdown

                                            Markdown dates to 2004; HN launched in 2007.

                                            1. 3

                                              https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=1 : October 9th, 2006.

                                              Still postdates Markdown, but Markdown took some time to be adopted (as arp242 says).

                                              1. 1

                                                Oh, I thought HN was older. It still predates Markdown’s ubiquity.

                                              2. -1

                                                Markdown is as old as email. It wasn’t called markdown but people have used those same symbols for decades.

                                                1. 1

                                                  I get where you’re going but I think you’ve confused the destination with the vehicle :)

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I’m just saying that there’s not really any excuse for HN to not render comments nicely except that they don’t want to. For what it’s worth, not rendering quotes nicely probably discourages people from doing that reddit-style quote-every-paragraph-and-respond-to-them-individually trolling where people nitpick individual points instead of addressing someone’s overall message. At least in theory. In practice people use code blocks to quote which is so, so much worse.

                                              3. 5

                                                Transparent moderation.

                                                Edit - related to the above, a semi-clear feeling for what’s on-topic. I, for one, am happy not to see random Wikipedia articles submitted.

                                                1. 4

                                                  I have exactly zero interest in, and thus tolerance for, articles about ‘founders’ and startup culture that have exactly zero technical content.

                                                  I don’t see myself ever starting a company, and if I ever do I’m not convinced keeping up with HN is the path to success I’d choose.

                                                  1. 4

                                                    Reply notifications.

                                                    Means you can have a conversation.

                                                    Hack news tends to invite twitter style snarks rather than engagement.

                                                    1. 4

                                                      HN is often too corporate which I hadn’t seen it happen on lobsters yet. Many threads devolve to IPOs and silicon Valley cringy corporate cultures.

                                                      I’m not sure how exactly lobsters discourage it so it might be just because we’re too small.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        People mentioned community feel. I’ll add specific example of the “What are you doing/reading/etc?” threads where people just show up, talk about themselves, support each other, and sometimes connect in interesting ways. It has a sort of small town or neighborhood feel. Hacker News is so big that their Show or Ask threads are like reading a survey of a city’s worth of people. The latter is also why you’ll see more opportunities, though.

                                                        Different strengths and weaknesses.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          I prefer it because the articles are more on topic to programming and development. As for a second reason, I find that people tend to be more civil here. I’m personally a fan of heavy handed moderation around aggressive or troll-like interactions , even if sometimes I get hit with it myself as it keeps the discussion interesting and productive.

                                                        1. 3

                                                          Our computer labs in undergrad (mostly Mac) were entirely inhabited by people using it for Gopher, web and Telnet (me), Marathon (a couple people who talked the cool lab assistants into playing with them), and one guy who brazenly and frequently came in with floppies and in full view of everyone proceeded to download lots of … well, let’s just say that, depending on your kink, anything floppy wouldn’t be by then.

                                                          There was also the little SE/30 in a corner cage running AppleShare and all the cool apps your heart desired. This was externally accessible via Gopher for awhile, and I managed to archive it all before it was finally taken off line about a decade-ish ago.

                                                          If anyone was actually doing work, I never saw it.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            On my Quad G5 I usually ran it in Reduced performance, and Highest when I was doing a job I needed done fast. I realize CPU power management has changed greatly since 2005, but there’s definitely precedent for this in the macOS, and there’s good use cases for throttling when you know you won’t need the CPU cycles.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I wonder what the power consumptions in reduced/highest modes on a Quad G5 are. Do you have any numbers?

                                                              1. 2

                                                                I seem to recall it was a difference on the order of 50W or so, depending on CPU load. Definitely not trivial. ISTR the Quad in Reduced drew somewhere between 200-250W per the UPS readout (it’s no longer hooked up to it, so I can’t easily check just now).

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I’ve got one of these, and my mother for the longest time used it for note taking in church. If you think of it as a PalmOS “laptop” you’re close to the user experience, but really most of the appeal is in the surprisingly good keyboard and the few apps that supported the wide screen. The built-in word processor naturally leverages both of those things and it does it pretty well. Battery life is also quite good, though the backlight can be expensive. Mine uses a Palm SD-Bluetooth card for connectivity.

                                                              1. 6

                                                                I find it curious that the Blink team at Google takes this action in order to prevent various other teams at Google from doing harmful user-agent sniffing to block browsers they don’t like. Google certainly isn’t the only ones, but they’re some of the biggest user-agent sniffing abusers.

                                                                FWIW, I think it’s a good step, nobody needs to know I’m on Ubuntu Linux using X11 on an x86_64 CPU running Firefox 74 with Gecko 20100101. At most, the Firefox/74 part is relevant, but even that has limited value.

                                                                1. 14

                                                                  They still want to know that. The mail contains a link to the proposed “user agent client hints” RFC, which splits the user agent into multiple more standardized headers the server has to request, making “user-agent sniffing” more effective.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    Oh. That’s sad. I read through a bit of the RFC now, and yeah, I don’t see why corporations wouldn’t just ask for everything and have slightly more reliable fingerprinting while still blocking browsers they don’t like. I don’t see how the proposed replacement isn’t also “an abundant source of compatibility issues … resulting in browsers lying about themselves … and sites (including Google properties) being broken in some browsers for no good reason”.

                                                                    What possible use case could a website have for knowing whether I’m on ARM or Risc-V or x86 or x86_64 other than fingerprinting? How is it responsible to let the server ask for the exact model of device you’re using?

                                                                    The spec even contains wording like “To set the Sec-CH-Platform header for a request, given a request (r), user agents MUST: […] Let value be a Structured Header object whose value is the user agent’s platform brand and version”, so there’s not even any space for a browser to offer an anti-fingerprinting setting and still claim to be compliant.

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      What possible use case could a website have for knowing whether I’m on ARM or Risc-V or x86 or x86_64 other than fingerprinting?

                                                                      Software download links.

                                                                      How is it responsible to let the server ask for the exact model of device you’re using?

                                                                      … Okay, I’ve got nothing. At least the W3C has the presence of mind to ask the same question. This is literally “Issue 1” in the spec.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        Okay, I’ve got nothing.

                                                                        I have a use case for it. I’ve a server which users run on a intranet (typically either just an access point, or a mobile phone hotspot), with web browsers running on random personal tablets/mobile devices. Given that the users are generally not technical, they’d probably be able to identify a connected device as “iPad” versus “Samsung S10” if I can show that in the web app (or at least ask around to figure out whose device it is), but will not be able to do much with e.g an IP address.

                                                                        Obviously pretty niche. I have more secure solutions planned for this, however I’d like to keep the low barrier to entry that knowing the hardware type from user agent provides in addition to those.

                                                                      2. 2

                                                                        What possible use case could a website have for knowing whether I’m on ARM or Risc-V or x86 or x86_64 other than fingerprinting?

                                                                        Benchmarking and profiling. If your site performance starts tanking on one kind of processor on phones in the Philippines, you probably want to know that to see what you can do about it.

                                                                        Additionally, you can build a website with a certain performance budget when you know what your market minimally has. See the Steam Hardware and Software Survey for an example of this in the desktop videogame world.

                                                                        Finally, if you generally know what kinds of devices your customers are using, you can buy a bunch of those for your QA lab to make sure users are getting good real-world performance.

                                                                    2. 7

                                                                      Gecko 20100101

                                                                      Amusingly, this date is a static string — it is already frozen for compatibility reasons.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Any site that offers you/administrators a “login history” view benefits from somewhat accurate information. Knowing the CPU type or window system probably doesn’t help much, but knowing it’s Firefox on Ubuntu combined with a location lookup from your IP is certainly a reasonable description to identify if it’s you or someone else using the account.

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          There are terms I’d certainly like sites to know if I’m using a minority browser or a minority platform, though. Yes, there are downsides because of the risk of fingerprinting, but it’s good to remind sites that people like me exist.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Though the audience here will play the world’s tiniest violin regarding for those affected the technical impact aspect may be of interest.

                                                                            The version numbering is useful low-hanging-fruit method in the ad-tech industry to catch fraud. A lot of bad actors use either just old browsers[1] or skew browser usage ratios; though of course most ‘fraud’ detection methods are native and just assume anything older than two major releases is fraud and ignore details such as LTS releases.

                                                                            [1] persuade the user to install a ‘useful’ tool and it sits as a background task burning ads or as a replacement for the users regular browser (never updated)

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            You haven’t lived until you’ve run BeOS on an actual BeBox. Love those blinkenlights.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              I have been reviving mine over the holidays, so I was quite surprised to see this story surface at around the same time. https://www.reddit.com/r/vintagecomputing/comments/eku19u/dusted_off_one_of_my_old_beboxes/

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                The dude has three, one being a Hobbit?! My jelly runneth over. Took me ages to find the one 133MHz I own.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  that dude is me, the username is the clue :-)

                                                                            1. 4

                                                                              So guys, when do we plan on a version of the web us techs, academics, and whoever else cares, care about?

                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                I’ve observed a number of people in those categories testing the Gopher waters again - myself included. Perhaps it’d make a good alternative? Far from great, but almost all the infrastructure and software is pre-existing.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  Come on in. The water’s great.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    I’m busy making my own swimming pool: https://lobste.rs/s/b7lt29/show_your_personal_websites#c_6veoft :)

                                                                                2. 3

                                                                                  Yggdrasil and darkhttpd?

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  I hope it gets ported to ppc64 (BE).

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    Shouldn’t be hard. I marked the couple places in the backend where endianess matters and the rest of the DOSBox dynrec patch for the (necessarily) big-endian ppc32 version should work for ppc64. All someone (tm) has to do is Just Do It.(tm)

                                                                                  1. 17

                                                                                    I’m waiting for the day someone ports a layout engine to wasm and renders to canvas. So much for content blocking.

                                                                                    1. 4

                                                                                      Like QT or others? https://doc.qt.io/qt-5/wasm.html

                                                                                      I remember a fork of SproutCore that would ditch all that HTML stuff and just render directly to canvas.

                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                        Not to WASM, but…

                                                                                        Atlantis: Robust, Extensible Execution Environments for Web Applications

                                                                                        Today’s web applications run inside a complex browser environment that is buggy, ill-specified, and implemented in different ways by different browsers. Thus, web applications that desire robustness must use a variety of conditional code paths and ugly hacks to deal with the vagaries of their runtime. Our new exokernel browser, called Atlantis, solves this problem by providing pages with an extensible execution environment. Atlantis defines a narrow API for basic services like collecting user input, exchanging network data, and rendering images. By composing these primitives, web pages can define custom, high-level execution environments. Thus, an application which does not want a dependence on Atlantis’ predefined web stack can selectively redefine components of that stack, or define markup formats and scripting languages that look nothing like the current browser runtime. Unlike prior microkernel browsers like OP, and unlike compile-to-JavaScript frameworks like GWT, Atlantis is the first browsing system to truly minimize a web page’s dependence on black box browser code. This makes it much easier to develop robust, secure web applications.

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          I collect stuff like OP architecture. Missed this. Thanks for the link!

                                                                                        2. 1

                                                                                          We have TeX in WASM already. ;)

                                                                                          https://people.math.osu.edu/fowler.291/latex/

                                                                                          1. 1
                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            This smells like tcsh and cdpath.

                                                                                            • the last tcsh user on lobste.rs