1. 1

    I use Pelican for my blog, using my own theme. I haven’t updated the content since having a third child, but I updated the backend to python3 and modern pelican a year ago. I like Pelican because it does just enough for what I want.

    1. 5

      I have the Dell UltraSharp U2718Q and find it to be totally fine, even with gaming. Wirecutter says it’s their budget 4K screen. Would be nice if it had USB-C but not something I need.

      1. 1

        Yeah, I have the 2715Q. Bought two for $435 each in 2018 for work. I have been very happy with them for office use. Anything less than UHD is just horrible on the eyes after using retina screens for almost a decade now. I don’t get how anyone stands it (Google doesn’t issue UHD monitors to staff which I think is pretty nuts).

        1. 1

          Have three of these (computing family), they’re great and I’m totally satisfied. However, does not meet the refresh rate you mentioned.

          Older macbook pro drives two of them very nicely except for videoconf. All three have a problem wake from sleep, both OSs. I have to reset a monitor about once a month, which I can now do in less than a minute. Still wouldn’t hesitate to recommend. They’re beautiful and relatively affordable.

          1. 1

            Same display here. I love it. I have the HDMI cable connected to my (personal) Mac mini and a mini-DP cable loose to plug in my work laptop when I want to work.

            I’ve heard this year’s model has USB-C.

          1. 6

            Hm, seems like a nice addition to the existing explain service I know - https://explain.depesz.com

            Here is a comparison between the outputs from the same query plan:

            1. 3

              It’s that and also a fork/continuation of PEV, which is awesome and left complete about 4y ago, but a lot of people wanted results to be stored server-side (for collaboration) rather than browser local.

              I remember dalibo forking it some time ago, it looks like it’s come a long way!

            1. 7

              Predicate logic. Love me some predicate logic.

              Unsurprisingly I use TLA+, which was originally intended to be handwritten. Lamport didn’t think it was possible to model check at first!

              1. 1

                How does it help when written on paper and not auto-checked by software? Honestly curious!

                1. 5

                  As Lamport says, “Writing is nature’s way of telling us how lousy our thinking is”. If I say “at least one node is always online”, do I mean ∃n ∈ Nodes: □Online(n) or □∃ n ∈ Nodes: Online(n)? One says “One of the nodes in the system is alive for the entire lifetime of the system” and the other ways “at all points in the system, there is at least one node (not necessarily the same one) that is online.” Very different meanings! I can get away with ambiguity in the English, but if writing it as predicate logic I have to pick one.

                  1. 2

                    Assuming to be like a proof. My experience with TLA was that simply by enumerating the cases the software was trying to catch, you could start to see the problems in your assumptions.

                1. 9

                  I’m quite uncomfortable with the idea of discord recording voice calls. Keeping records of chat logs is obviously necessary with the way Discord is designed, which is around long duration searchable history of channels, anyone being able to invite anyone to the server, etc.

                  But voice calls are totally ephemeral. And people expect them to be treated that way. Someone keeping logs of a text conversation in Discord wouldn’t be considered odd. Someone recording a voice call they were in, without telling anyone? That’d be considered a breach of trust in every Discord community I’ve been in. So Discord the company having the ability to do so is just creepy.

                  1. 6

                    I’m not sure what drives you to expect privacy from a communications platform fueled with venture capital money. I wouldn’t be surprised they’re trying to do at least two things:

                    1. Applying a censor to voice depending on server/user DM configuration. I know they’ve got some kind of OCR that tries to identify and block offensive words contained in images, such as the N word, when people are not friends and at least one side hasn’t changed the “safe direct messaging” option down to “I live on the edge”.
                    2. Store records at least temporarily for law enforcement.

                    And the obvious other things are keeping for post-processing and derive user interests for advertising, or batching and forwarding the information to intelligence agencies.

                    It’s hard to tell, realy.

                    1. 4

                      If voice calls are being recorded, users should be shown a very clear warning, at the very least.

                      On a side node, the fact that a behavior is not surprising does not make it acceptable or not worthy of discussion.

                      1. 2

                        Is there a mention of this in the ToS? (I don’t get a hit for the string “audio” there).

                        At least in Sweden (and maybe in the EU in general), if you call a contact center that employs “sentiment analysis” and “quality control”, you are informed of this beforehand.

                        If Discord does record voice but doesn’t inform beforehand (through a ToS), they could get in big trouble in the EU.

                        1. 2

                          I’m not a lawyer, get a lawyer for good advice.

                          I couldn’t find anything related to recording and retention, or user deletion outside of copyright-infringement contexts, which is what a good section of this doc appears to be (dcma, etc).

                          There is a dense “Your Content” paragraph, which I have modified to bullet by sentence, and also bold the major points:

                          You represent and warrant that:

                          • Your Content is original to you and that you exclusively own the rights to such content including the right to grant all of the rights and licenses in these Terms without the Company incurring any third party obligations or liability arising out of its exercise of such rights and licenses.
                          • All of Your Content is your sole responsibility and the Company is not responsible for any material that you upload, post, or otherwise make available.
                          • By uploading, distributing, transmitting or otherwise using Your Content with the Service, you grant to us a perpetual, nonexclusive, transferable, royalty-free, sublicensable, and worldwide license to use, host, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform, and display Your Content in connection with operating and providing the Service.

                          @gerikson, this appears to be full grant and indemnification, which also covers traditional voice chat.

                          1. 2

                            Thanks for this. The “content” section seems to be standard boilerplate that many content platforms include to allow them to duplicate content over CDNs etc. Periodically there’s a panic in the form of “OMG Facebook owns all your content!!!” based on misunderstanding of these clauses.

                            Possibly Discord reserves the right to terminate service if they can determine that someoene is abusive in voice chat. It would be interesting to hear if anyone has lost access in this way - i.e. been unfailingly polite in text but violating the ToS in voice. That would be somewhat strong proof that audio is recorded and monitored, at least after complaints are made.

                          2. 1

                            Putting some fine print in the ToS that nobody reads doesn’t count as ‘notifying beforehand’ in my opinion.

                      2. 2

                        If they’re up-front with it, I say there’s nothing wrong. Otherwise, I agree. I use discord all the time because many communities are using it these days, but never the voice chat, just because text is more consistent and easier to communicate with many people and ideas.

                        1. 10

                          If they’re up-front with it, I say there’s nothing wrong.

                          Muggers are often quite up-front too, and less opaque than most web TOSes these days.

                          1. 3

                            Thanks for that comment, you made my morning :)

                            1. 3

                              Muggers and TOSes are not comparable…

                              1. 1

                                Honest Americans offering a service of stress release, with clear and direct terms of service agreements. God bless

                            2. 2

                              There’s nothing suggesting they do any recording of voice calls. I wouldn’t at all be surprised they have the ability to, they own the server and the proprietary service you’re using to communicate with.

                              1. 5

                                Discord provides a policy regarding user privacy, which explains it may capture “transient VOIP data”. While it’s a bit unclear what this may entail, our research shows that this “data” includes all voice and video data.

                                This suggests to me they’re recording voice calls.

                                1. 2

                                  They could be doing literally anything with this unspecified data, and I’d basessly assert it’s probably related to audio processing features like noise cancelling and echo reduction, versus being vague terminology for nefarious purposes.

                              2. 2

                                Are there any well-polished and E2EE (or selfhosted) voice + video call applications that people here on lobste.rs would recommend? The ones I could find don’t seem to work very well on slow connections (dynamic video bitrate pls), so I’m looking for more alternatives.

                                1. 3

                                  The only thing I can recommend right now is Matrix.org. You can self-host it and compared to many many other solutions, the protocol is rather consistent and nothing is bolted on. I like the idea how encryption keys are first-class-citizens compared to XMPP and others.

                                  1. 1

                                    Does matrix.org support reactions in text chat (thumbs up, etc.)?

                                    I tried the Fractal client and I couldn’t find a way to see or create reactions.

                                    1. 2

                                      i currently use the riot client and it supports emoji-style reactions in text. so i assume it’s part of matrix itself and maybe some clients haven’t implemented it (or it’s buried in the UI?)

                              1. 5

                                Previous lobsters discussion on the original Hello World article, for those who missed it.

                                1. 9

                                  I am not sure what in the Signal client on Android sucks? Could you elaborate? I’ve been using it for years to communicate with friends and family and I don’t have any big frustrations with it.

                                  1. 5

                                    I find the mobile client acceptable (iOS in my case) but my real problem is when using both mobile and desktop clients, I get very erratic behavior on desktop: messages very often get reordered or dropped. Like, the conversation will be seriously scrambled. This doesn’t seem acceptable to me—I can imagine it leading to serious confusion, even danger.

                                    1. 2

                                      I use the Android app and the desktop app every day and have never seem messaged dropped, and only very rarely seem misordering. Hopefully they can address whatever’s causing the issues you’re seeing.

                                      1. 2

                                        I think it’s more likely to happen if you use the desktop client occasionally so it has to sync a batch of messages… I’ve seen GitHub issues about it but no solution.

                                    2. 4

                                      This is just my opinion, mind you, but I’m not a big fan of the UI. Maybe Telegram’s UI has spoiled me.

                                      1. 2

                                        I do agree with @icyphox. It is not as smooth as the Telegram GUI. You can’t use gestures for example.

                                        1. 1

                                          Pardon me for being out of the loop but what gestures do you need for for communication with people?

                                          On the contrary, I found using IRC on the phone to be some of the worst experiences with regards to UI.

                                          1. 2

                                            The fact that you can “swipe” from the settings menu to the home menu. You don’t have to reach with your thumb the button in the left upper corner, which is quite inconvenient with today’s screen sizes. You can do the same from conversations to the homscreen and from the contacts detail window.

                                        2. 2

                                          I don’t think it sucks, I think that SMS is a tough problem. In my experience on Signal, “MMS download failed” and “Error downloading MMS, tap to retry” was really frustrating. It’s still my default SMS client, but I’d rather not SMS.

                                        1. 2
                                          • MacOS (work) / chrome, outlook, iterm2, tmux, emacs incl. org, sublime text, fman, keepassxc, dropbox
                                          • Ubuntu (personal dev) / firefox, terminator, tmux, emacs incl. org, pycharm (trying again), okular, sublime text, fman, keepassxc, dropbox
                                          • Windows / firefox, steam etc, sublime text, keepassxc, dropbox
                                          1. 3

                                            I was previously unaware of keepassxc. Been needing a solution I like and this ticks my boxes. Thanks!

                                          1. 31

                                            Nice ad. :|

                                              1. 3

                                                Also at the moment according to the pricing page, payment is optional.

                                              2. 20

                                                You’re right, and how virtuous Sourcehut may or may not be doesn’t change that. The line between ad and article is a spectrum, but this seems to be pretty well into the ad side of things. I apologise, I’ll be more discerning in the future.

                                                1. 4

                                                  If you crack some other good places to get the word out, I’d be interested in hearing. My online circle is pretty small (lobste.rs and HN), but I’m working on something I want to ‘advertise’ the hell out of quite soon…

                                                  1. 5

                                                    I’ve been trying to engage more with Reddit for this reason. I don’t really like it as a platform or see it as doing a social good, but there are users there and I’d like to be there to answer their questions. I was going to make a Twitter account, too, but they wanted my phone number and a pic of my ID and a blood sample to verify my account so I abandoned that. Finding good ways to ethically grow Sourcehut’s audience is not an entirely solved problem.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      The reason Twitter – and many platforms – asks for phone numbers is because spam and trolls are a persistent problem. Ban one neo-Nazi troll tweeting obscenities at some black actor for DesTROyinG WhITe SocIEtY and they’ll create a new account faster than you can say “fuck off Nazi”.

                                                      Reddit is often toxic as hell by the way, so good luck with that.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Huh…I have a twitter account and all I needed for it was an email. Maybe things have changed.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Nowadays they let you in with just an email, but after some time “block” your account and only unblock it after you give your phone number.

                                                    2. 3

                                                      While I also see it as an ad, I’m interested in what it being announced as a Sourcehut user. But it seems you don’t have a RSS/Atom feed for the official blog… Or is there a mailing list I missed?

                                                      1. 2

                                                        https://sourcehut.org/blog/index.xml

                                                        I’ve been meaning to make this more visible… hold please done.

                                                    3. 15

                                                      It’s advertising an open source project, Source Hut, but also Janet, Zig, Nim, Samurai, Sway and other open source projects I like. Projects that get very little payment or gratitude for the work they do.

                                                      Yes sr.ht is a service too, a useful one at that. They support BSD well, unlike other companies, how else are they supposed to let people know this fact? Should they be paying largely unethical companies like google for ad space? Or should they just be more subversive so people don’t complain.

                                                      Let me put it this way, if every open source project was also a business, should we hate on every single one for advertising? sr.ht didn’t game the upvotes to get on the front page, people upvoted it by themselves.

                                                      I suppose there could be a tag ‘sponsored’ so people can ignore them. Not suggesting allowing lower quality from sponsored content either, probably the inverse.

                                                      1. 21

                                                        The issue is that I see a Sourcehut “ad” every few days: “Sourcehut supports OpenBSD”, “Sourcehut supports migrations from Bitbucket”, “Sourcehut supports ASCII”. Yeah … we got it … A lot of these posts don’t have a lot of meat to them and at this point, it’s just getting spammy.

                                                        1. 16

                                                          Yeah … we got it … A lot of these posts don’t have a lot of meat to them and at this point, it’s just getting spammy.

                                                          They don’t always have a lot of “meat,” but posts about SourceHut represent a capitalist ideology I can actually get behind. A single proprietor, working their ass off to try to change the software world, which has gotten extremely out of hand with regards to complexity, and the marketing of products that fix the complex systems we don’t need, at all, to begin with.

                                                          What’s the difference between a SourceHut post, and an post ad that complains that as an open source author I am not compensated fairly? Hint: one should be inspiration, for the other is actually possible.

                                                          1. 0

                                                            SourceHut represent a capitalist ideology

                                                            payment for the service is optional, so no it doesn’t. All the things that make Sourcehut great in my opinion are the ways in which it denies capitalist ideology. Open Source Software, optional payments, etc.

                                                            1. 3

                                                              optional payments

                                                              It’s optional, right now, while in Alpha. It doesn’t seem the plan is that forever. Also, if it wasn’t clear, I’m extremely in favor of this model of charging people for a service, but releasing your software under a permissive license.

                                                          2. 10

                                                            Just let me other another data point here. It was thanks to the “migration from Bitbucket” post that I found out Sourcehut had a nifty script to help migrations from Bitbucket and that saved hours of work as I migrated 20+ repos effortlessly. This current post made me realize that maybe I should be paying more attention to their CI system as it looks much simpler than others I’ve used. So, in the end, I’m appreciating these blog posts a lot. Yes they are related to a commercial venture but so what? You can self-host it if you’re not into SaaS outside your control. If we set a hard line like this, then it becomes impossible to post about any commercial project at all. It is already hard to monetize FOSS projects to make them sustainable, now imagine if they are not even allowed blog posts…

                                                            1. 4

                                                              Same here. This string of posts made me aware of sourcehut and when I had to migrate from bitbucket, I then gave them a hard eval. I like their human, non-shitty business model of “I give them money and they give me services”, and that their products are professionally executed and no-frills.

                                                              I don’t know how to reconcile it. These articles were very useful to me, when most product ads weren’t and I’d be disappointed if this site became a product advert platform. I think people are right for flagging it is almost-an-ad, but in this one vendor’s case I’m glad I saw them and am now a happy sourcehut customer.

                                                            2. 2

                                                              every few days

                                                              A lot of these posts don’t have a lot of meat to them and at this point, it’s just getting spammy.

                                                              That is fair I guess. I’ll have to check the guidelines on things like that.

                                                            3. 6

                                                              if every open source project was also a business, should we hate on every single one for advertising?

                                                              Yes. I flag those too. Advertising is a mind killer.

                                                              1. 6

                                                                But there is no other way to get large numbers of people to know about something, following your advice would be suicide.

                                                                I also hate advertising, I just don’t see a way around it. I won’t argue further against banishing advertising from lobste.rs at least.

                                                                1. 7

                                                                  But there is no other way to get large numbers of people to know about something, following your advice would be suicide.

                                                                  All these conversations are done like it’s all or nothing. We allow politics/marketing/etc on Lobsters or… it never happens anywhere with massive damage to individuals and society. Realistically, this is a small site with few monetary opportunities for a SaaS charging as little as he does. If the goal is spreading the word, it’s best done on sites and platforms with large numbers of potential users and (especially) paying customers. Each act of spreading the word should maximize the number of people they reach for both societal impact and profit for sustainability.

                                                                  Multiple rounds on Lobsters means, aside from the first announcement with much fan fare, the author sacrificed each time opportunities to reach new, larger audiences to show the same message again to the same small crowd. Repeating it here is the opposite of spreading the word. Especially since most here that like Sourcehut are probably already following it. Maybe even buying it. He’s preaching to the choir here more than most places.

                                                                  Mind-killer or not, anyone talking about large-scale adoption of software, ideology, etc should be using proven tactics in the kinds of places that get those results. That’s what you were talking about, though. I figured he was just trying to show latest BSD-related progress on one of his favorite tech forums. More noise than signal simply because he was sharing excitement more than doing technical posts or focused marketing.

                                                                2. 5

                                                                  Every blog post is an ad for something. It may not be a product, directly, but it’s advertising an idea, the person, or persons the idea was thought by, the writing (which, btw can be a product) of the author, etc.

                                                                  If you want to sincerely flag advertising, you might as well get offline—it’s pervasive.

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    It may not be a product, directly, but it’s advertising an idea

                                                                    Not a native english speaker here. I may be wrong, but after looking at the dictionnary definition

                                                                    advertisement

                                                                    noun

                                                                    A paid notice that tells people about a product or service.

                                                                    it seems that an advertisement has a precise definition: an ad is directly related to a paid product, not an idea.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      it seems that an advertisement has a precise definition: an ad is directly related to a paid product, not an idea.

                                                                      This is a fairly pedantic interpretation. A person promotes an idea to sell something, if even themselves. That “sale” might only come later in the form of a job offer, or support through Patreon, etc, etc.. But, to say that you can’t advertise an idea is wrong. The cigarette industry’s ad campaigns have always been about selling an image, an idea that if you smoke you become part of something bigger. Oh, and btw, you’ll probably remember the brand name, and buy that kind instead of something else.

                                                                      iPods were sold on the very basis of white headphones, TO THE POINT, that people without iPods started wearing white headphones to be part of the “club.” Advertisements sell you the idea of a better life, and hopefully you’ll buy my product to get it.

                                                              2. 3

                                                                Somewhat amusing that this post with an interesting fully FOSS service, is marked -29 spam, whereas an actual advertisement about Huawei making macbook clones that run Linux has only -3 spam (one of which is mine).

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  Said FOSS service has been on the Lobsters front page multiple times recently. I suspect the reaction is: “We get it, sr.ht exists and SirCmpwn is apparently desperate to attract a paying customerbase, but a clickbaity title for a blogspam ad on the usual suspect’s software is probably crossing the line.”

                                                              1. 17

                                                                It’s nice to read the Etsy story from the author. Also, his point is something I also agree with, having gone through similar product lifecycles (from creating something new and fun to maintaining and iterating on it). The main takeaway from these slides for me is this:

                                                                Software that’s been around longer tends to need less care and feeding than software that just came out.

                                                                This, a thousand times. Once you worked with a mature piece of technology in a domain, you get to relate and compare to it. A great example at my recent company is Go. We have two camps of engineers: ones who want to use Go and those who vote for Java. The main argument for the Java folks was the maturity of the tooling and environment.

                                                                Some teams chose Go. Some did Java. A few years down the road with services in production, the Go teams started to realise the gap they had in tooling, standard libraries and the lot compared to teams working in Java. Some teams migrated to Java, but most of them are just spending a bunch of time building these tools from scratch or contributing to existing solutions, to add the support.

                                                                There’s nothing good or bad, choosing new and different technologies. But it’s good to take the additional effort and additional learning into consideration when doing so - and in many cases, this might actually be a reason to choose a new technology over an existing one!

                                                                1. 12

                                                                  What gaps did the teams run into with Go?

                                                                  1. 7

                                                                    The biggest limitations we have found were maturity of toolchains and the availability of high-quality libraries in Java that were not there with Go a few years ago. Both have nothing to do with the language and everything to do with the maturity of the ecosystem.

                                                                    For example, Java has excellent tooling for IDE integration, refactoring, static analysis, garbage collection analysis. Debugging I’m production has strong tooling support. Go is catching up in these areas.

                                                                    Stream packages like RxJava, high-performance networking libraries like Netty, inter-threading libraries like Disruptor were readily available and important to some services that decided to go with Java. Again, a lot of teams/services either did not need these or considered the lack of them no dealbreaker when going with Go, considering some of the other upsides, like the canonical style and the strong community and growth around it.

                                                                    Most of my points were for Go 2-3 years ago. The ecosystem is growing fast, libraries and tools becoming more mature. But this approach will be true for the next “new” language or framework a team picks - which may not even exist today!

                                                                    1. 6

                                                                      We’ve run into situations with inconsistent quality with ecosystem libraries (lots of breaking changes requiring aggressive vendoring / forking), or just not having an equivalent library.

                                                                      One example until recently was a MongoDB driver (this is, itself, probably worth scrutiny in the first place), also libraries for working with PDFs. Some tooling for AWS Kinesis is kludgy on their go-sdk or just missing features.

                                                                      For the vast majority of what you need to do we haven’t had too much we needed to roll custom compared to java though.

                                                                    2. 2

                                                                      Completely agree. I include this right in the interview screen and job descriptions. Doing so has helped both our organization and the prospective applicants, because some people want to work on the bleeding edge. They’re not going to be thrilled working in our team, where we try to stick with “boring” tech choices.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Tutoring three kids in elementary courses. Concluding quarantine for youngest child’s stomach virus. Yard and house maintenance. First session of lego robot season for oldest child.

                                                                      Stretch goal: write first draft of a review of Three Body Problem trilogy.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Kids to gymnastics/parkour. Home soccer practice for youngest, then team soccer game tomorrow. Cookout with family. Writing practice (mixed cases) for youngest.

                                                                        Lawn maintenance and maybe some continued demolition for the bathroom project.

                                                                        Sync environment settings across personal machines. Travel for on-site week at job. Try to get a D&D or board game session in with kids before trip.

                                                                        1. 12

                                                                          That’s all well and good, but I think it goes against the usual flow of using vi, which (to me) feels optimised for opening, editing, closing, running other commands in the shell, opening again and so forth.

                                                                          Emacs, OTOH, feels much more like it’s intended to be opened once, then used for a prolonged period of time (an entire login session, perhaps). It has a rich set of buffer-manipulation commands which assist with this, as well as many interactive modes which perform tasks vi users would probably do from the shell (browse the web, say, or read email).

                                                                          There’s nothing wrong with trying to live in vi, really, but there’s a lot of programming required to bring it the features found in Emacs — and much of that work has already been done for Emacs, and if it hasn’t been, well, elisp is a much nicer language than Vimscript.

                                                                          I use vi almost every day, but I live in Emacs. For me, at least, living in vi would feel odd.

                                                                          1. 6

                                                                            Though my workflow in vim is as you described, that is merely a personal choice. Vimscript is no longer the only option in mainline vim, and, if you require even more power, the neovim fork aims to allow any language for plugins.

                                                                            And much of this usability work has already been done. I am currently in limbo between emacs and neovim; with org-mode drawing me in from one side, and all of my fuzzy-file-finding and project navigating plugin tools pulling me from the other. It’s just as much “programming” to set these things up in emacs.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              all of my fuzzy-file-finding and project navigating plugin tools pulling me from the other. It’s just as much “programming” to set these things up in emacs.

                                                                              Do Helm and Projectile not do the trick? Prelude packages them both up nicely.

                                                                              If you prefer the vi style, I hear excellent things about Spacemacs.

                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                I am more saying that I already have that stuff set up in neovim, and it will be just as much work to figure it out in emacs. EDIT: I have tried spacemacs, but it feels heavy-weight and gives me option paralysis.

                                                                            2. 4

                                                                              I have a friend who uses something in between: He uses ^z to get back to the shell and fg to return to vim. He has multiple vim instances in the background sometimes. Essentially he uses shell jobs instead of vim buffers.

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                Binding ^z to fg might have been the single most impactful thing I ever put in my zshrc.

                                                                                function rebind-z() { fg }
                                                                                zle -N rebind-z
                                                                                bindkey '^Z' rebind-z
                                                                                
                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  I do this instead of using vim buffers, I think because I spend most of my time in the shell and not vim.

                                                                                  Line for line, I write just as much zsh code as anything else.

                                                                                2. 3

                                                                                  I’m currently a heavy vim user, and have made everything (browser, window manager, tmux, shell, etc) use vim-like bindings. This is how I ‘live in vim’ (though not actually always in vim). I’m really curious what your workflow looks like using emacs + vi though. Getting to the point I am at now with everything set up this way was not easy, but on the other hand, using emacs would require me to unlearn a ton of old muscle memory and learn a ton of new muscle memory.

                                                                                  1. 4

                                                                                    Take a look at Spacemacs – truly the best of both worlds, plus a mind-opening leader key menu (the “Space” part).

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      I’m really curious what your workflow looks like using emacs + vi though.

                                                                                      Honestly, I’m a bit embarrassed by it: I ought to use emacsclient instead of vi (and in fact on one of my machines I do). Instead, I tend to use Emacs to edit code, documents (LaTeX or Org mode), browse the web (ewe), read documentation (woman), interact with git (Magit), handle projects (Projectile), interact with Common Lisp (SLIME), work in a shell (Eshell) and so forth.

                                                                                      Meanwhile, I use vi to do quick edits to line-oriented config files, e.g. stuff in /etc, in part because I have an old habit of typing sudo vi /etc/foo rather than editing sudo::/etc/foo with TRAMP (I keep trying to switch completely, but … old habits die hard).

                                                                                      I would suggest to everyone to not do as I do, but just learn Emacs and use it for everything. If you want vi’s almost certainly better text-manipulation language, then use Viper mode, e.g. as provided by Spacemacs.

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                                                                                      As someone who uses vi for spot-editing and emacs for project work, I work like you.

                                                                                      Emacs, OTOH, feels much more like it’s intended to be opened once, then used for a prolonged period of time (an entire login session, perhaps).

                                                                                      With tmux, for me emacs is open until unplanned server reboot or emacs version upgrade.

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                                                                                      Like @vfoley, I’m trying to read more for enjoyment than for profession.

                                                                                      For enjoyment:

                                                                                      • Remembrance of Earth’s Past trilogy by Cixin Liu – currently reading
                                                                                      • Circe by Madeline Miller
                                                                                      • Permutation City by Greg Egan
                                                                                      • The Inheritance Trilogy by N.K. Jemisin
                                                                                      • Fifth Risk by Michael Lewis
                                                                                      • Percy Jackson books 2-5 by Rick Riordan and Harry Potter books 6-7 by J.K. Rowling, to keep up with my kids

                                                                                      I plan to read one or two professional books this year. Current leads in my professional queue:

                                                                                      • Rust Book
                                                                                      • Python for Finance 2e by Yves Hilpisch
                                                                                      • Debugging Teams by Brian Fitzpatrick and Ben Collins
                                                                                      • Manager’s Path by Camille Fournier
                                                                                      • Managing Humans by Michael Lopp
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                                                                                        Happy holidays and new year, Lobsters! I love this community, I hope everyone has a great end of year. Cheers!

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                                                                                          Three professional/software goals:

                                                                                          • small but nontrivial project in Rust
                                                                                          • find an architecture/specification format that doesn’t feel like a waste of time
                                                                                          • continue to work at screening, interviewing, hiring
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                                                                                            I’ll look over your resume. I’m not in java/scala, but I agree with itamarst that most resumes have simple problems, and I’m happy to be a neutral eye. Will PM you my email.

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                                                                                              Major: reading, video games, board games, movies.

                                                                                              Minor: electronics repair, weeding (not preventative care for the lawn, just weeding it. incredibly enjoyable).

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                                                                                                No mention of Pelican? Meh.

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                                                                                                  Do you have any experience with Pelican? Will you tell us about it?

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                                                                                                    My blog runs on Pelican. So far it’s been a good experience. The greatest selling point for me was support for per-category (though not per-tag) Atom feeds. It’s a regrettably rare feature, but if you plan to ever add yourself to blog aggregators, or simply give readers an option to filter out the kind of stuff they are not interested in, it’s really nice to have.

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                                                                                                      Yes. A good thing about Pelican, among others is that it doesn’t require a gazillion dependencies and just works.

                                                                                                      I also recommends https://github.com/spanezz/staticsite because it doesn’t force a filesystem layout or HTML contents or markdown formats on you. Contrarily to other generators, you can use it to improve an existing “handmade” website without having to start from scratch.

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                                                                                                        My blog has been on hiatus since my most recent child, but another benefit of pelican is that it also is one of the last homes for ReStructuredText holdouts.

                                                                                                        I also found the hooks for adding logic/post-processing to be painless.

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                                                                                                      Currently reading:

                                                                                                      • Split the Party, by Drew Hayes. Light, fun reading. I love it, but this is a very niche novel. If the premise seems like it’d be fun to you, you might like it.
                                                                                                      • Meditations, by Marcus Aurelius as translated by Martin Hammond. Only in passages.

                                                                                                      Recently finished The Phoenix Project by Gene Kim, Kevin Behr, George Spafford. Framed as fiction, but really a narrative around an ideology. My fiction-reading brain felt bad by the end, but my exhausted professional brain was happy for the narrative-chocolate coating.

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                                                                                                        I saw “Phoenix” got really excited and though it was a book on the History of Firefox. Looks just as interesting !