1. 5

    Every part of this sentence is wrong

    As I write this, it’s been discovered that newer versions of macOS include anti-malware functionality that transmits tracking information almost every time any program is run.

    It’s not anti-malware functionality, it’s verification

    It doesn’t transmit any information other than what it needs to verify, so not really tracking

    It’s only occasionally, again, for verification.

    1. 13

      Uh, no? Almost every part of that sentence is correct. See for yourself, straight from the horse’s mouth.

      Apple explicitly outlines its use for anti-malware purposes. More importantly, while Apple pinky promises that it doesn’t use this information for tracking, such information is more than sufficient for performing tracking, and considering it’s all sent unencrypted via a third-party CDN, Apple’s pinky promises are rendered completely moot anyway. Depending on your threat model, running macOS can be very dangerous.

    1. 14

      I wonder when they’ll finally get around to reinventing native applications. Imagine the fanfare when someone figures out how to write a program that works entirely without an internet connection. The future is bright.

      1. 4

        My understanding is basically that:

        • Zig is targeting C
        • Rust is targeting C++
        • Julia is targeting…Matlab/Numpy?
        • Elixir is targeting Erlang

        At least for Zig, how’s the ecosystem shaping up?

        1. 2

          Julia is targeting…Matlab/Numpy?

          Maybe R.

          1. 1

            And Python!

          2. 2

            Too early to tell wrt packages/libraries and that kind of thing, the package manager is planned:

            https://github.com/ziglang/zig/issues/943

            and the stdlib is intended to be fairly robust, so optimistically the soil will be good for a healthy ecosystem

            1. 1

              Rust is more like an Ada replacement. It’s much harder to implement ie. a graph structure in Rust than in C++.

            1. 32

              My site is at https://bernsteinbear.com. I get very polarized responses :)

              1. 12

                I think your site’s chill and classic!

                1. 2

                  Thanks ^_^

                2. 6

                  I love this! Its theme is very similar to the Oil shell site. Super clean.

                  1. 3

                    There’s a little comment in the CSS that says that the navbar was heavily “inspired” by oilshell :)

                  2. 3

                    Linux/Desktop (1920x1080, 16:9)/Chromium with uBlock

                    I really like this one. After reading a few of the “Compiling a Lisp” articles, I also copied a few design cues to my personal site. I’m sorry I cannot say more, it’s just easy to read and easy to navigate. If I had to try to say something it would be that the entire site is a bit too narrow, and that it might be better to use more semantic HTML5 tags instead of custom div classes?

                    1. 1

                      Is your current website the one everyone is complaining about? I think it’s great.

                      1. 2

                        Everybody is exaggerated, it was just one comment that caught my attention. But other than that, I don’t think it’s to surprising considering it’s inspiration ^^.

                      2. 1

                        Hm, interesting. Do you have any reading on this that you recommend? My HTML knowledge is at least 10, if not more, years out of date.

                        1. 2

                          I’m not expert either, I just check if I can use a semantic tag, when applicable. AFAIK the main advantage is that web readers /scrapers can properly parse what’s the site and what’s is just the header/footer (if you enable lobste.rs “article preview” feature, you’ll notice the difference).

                          1. 1

                            Oh, neat – thank you. I have some open graph data and some other metadata, but this might help.

                      3. 3

                        Your site has no bells or whistles. It is a site. It has text. The text is the main focus. There is no fluff. It loads instantly. It is glorious.

                        1. 1

                          Glad you like it :)

                        2. 2

                          I love it! Looks great on both my desktop and phone, and it isn’t weighed down by big images or fonts.

                          1. 1

                            Oh, that is good to hear. I do not regularly check up on how it looks on a phone, despite half my visitors using phones.

                          2. 2

                            I really like it. Text-heavy instead of the modern white peace overload with big images that everything leans towards now.

                            1. 1

                              Kinda like your website, eh? And you are a cyclist too! :D

                            2. 2

                              Clean, elegant styling, simple design, focus on the content (text). Clear links to different parts and an rss feed. Couldn’t make me happier.

                              1. 1

                                Glad you enjoy!

                              2. 2

                                The way you separated the series on the /blog is something I want to steal.

                                1. 2

                                  Oh man the implementation is such a hack. If you use Jekyll, please don’t look! :P

                                  1. 2

                                    I am in Python land, so I could not get it even if I looked. :)

                                    1. 1

                                      What do you use to generate your blog? I am considering moving off Jekyll.

                                      1. 2

                                        I use Lektor. It is based on python, so slower to generate the pages locally, but my reasons are listed in this post - why I chose Lektor. See the Why Lektor section.

                                2. 2

                                  I really like this one; it’s clean and simple, and it works great with me.

                                  1. 1

                                    Glad you like it!

                                  2. 2

                                    Academic style - I like it. Loads in 106ms from Frankfurt which is pretty nice :)

                                    1. 1

                                      Grüße aus den Staaten!

                                      1. 2

                                        I don’t really live in Germany (or understand german for that matter), but when I run https://tools.pingdom.com/ , I use Frankfurt since it has the best ping to Norway :)

                                        1. 1

                                          Oh, lol. That’s “greetings from the US”

                                          1. 2

                                            Greetings from Norway :D Or rather; Beste hilsener fra Norge :)

                                    2. 2
                                      1. 2

                                        For me it’s missing only one thing, which is to support dark mode via a CSS media query. I’d love to see just how brief a dark mode implementation can be, and your site is the perfect test subject.

                                        1. 2

                                          I brought back dark mode, new and improved. Can you let me know what you think?

                                          Re: brevity: the longest part is the syntax highlighting.

                                          1. 2

                                            Functionally it looks nice and readable, and should be pleasant in a dark room. Warm fireplace colors were a good choice for syntax.

                                            You could stop there; it’s a nice upgrade! If you want more critique:

                                            If any of the colors are off, it’s the links in dark mode. In light mode visited links stand out a little less than unvisited, which is desirable. In dark mode, the unvisited links are diminished against black and the visited stand out. I might try brightening the blue and dimming the purple a bit.

                                            Finally, check the link colors on the same dark screen as the syntax colors. The syntax colors give a cozy character to the site, but the link colors establish a different kind of environment, such that when you first reach a syntax block, the warmth is a surprise. I think the link colors would need more saturation to fit in.

                                            1. 1

                                              Thanks for the in depth reply! When I next find the energy to CSS I’ll take a look.

                                          2. 1

                                            Someone made one but there was something slightly wrong about pre tags in headers that weren’t legible (?), so I reverted it. It was pretty simple so if you’re interested you’re welcome to revive that patch.

                                          3. 2

                                            Nothing wrong with your site. It is a perfect example of what the web was originally created for: Sharing information.

                                            1. 2

                                              The bulleted list under “I like making things” is a little crowded, but otherwise, I love it!

                                              1. 2

                                                And to think I just removed some things :P Do you mean the length? Or the density of links? Or…?

                                                1. 2

                                                  I should have mentioned that I’m on mobile. The density of the links is part of it. I think inserting an empty line between list entries would make a world of difference. You could take it further by increasing font size and line spacing. The bullets also make it look like the text is being physically squished into the right side of the screen so it may help to replace them with faux bullets (e.g. asterisks)?

                                                  I don’t know, this feels like such a small point, and it’s all about highly personal preferences. Your site is great!

                                              2. 2

                                                I like the nav bar, the contrast, and the no-frills aesthetic, and the style choice of serif font works.

                                                Despite broadly agreeing with high-contrast text, I think the background could be a touch lighter (maybe just going from lobste.rs to your site is hard, especially since I’m in a light environment right now).

                                                Mostly, though, some breathing room would really help, especially with the bullet points; the line spacing between one single-line bullet point to the next is identical to the line-spacing between lines in a single multi-line bullet point. Everything just blurs together and only a small dot on the side helps me distinguish between bullets.

                                                Increasing the font size could also be a big help for people with impaired vision.

                                                1. 2

                                                  I added some list item spacing. Thanks for the tip off.

                                                  I also reduced the text contrast a little bit with some not-quite-black and not-quite-white.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Nice one. The bullet points are a lot easier to read now.

                                                    The lightening of the background does help, too, but I’m also in a dark environment now (albeit with the same bright screen).

                                                    I wasn’t even saying about darkening the text, but the muting there does help as well. I think overall you’ve struck a good balance between high contrast (light clashing with dark) and low contrast (words blending into the background).

                                              1. 2

                                                Mine is at https://neros.dev. I’d appreciate any feedback!

                                                1. 2

                                                  I love it! The text is a little low contrast, especially the blue, but otherwise, this is a fantastic site.

                                                1. 13

                                                  My sites at https://www.offtopica.uk/ - not sure if it’s had any human visitors yet :)

                                                  1. 3

                                                    That’s really nice.. I like the typographic alignment. On mobile, the scrolling gets a little wild from left to right.. Very clean. .

                                                    1. 2

                                                      Yeah. At least it happens on this page on a narrow display on iOS/Safari, but maybe one website out of three is affected by this kind of minor annoyance.

                                                    2. 2

                                                      This seems very readable. I’m not sure why some of your code blocks look different than others, but ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

                                                      1. 2

                                                        A c++ article on the frontpage, an about link and a feed. Nice clean style, good content, thumbs up from me. Subscribed to the feed so you’ll get at least one visitor if you publish something new.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Thank you very much. I’m not a very confident writer so this means a lot to me :)

                                                        2. 2

                                                          Maybe that is intentional, but to me inline code font is about 2x smaller compared to normal text font.

                                                          Also seems like you justify text without hyphenation.

                                                          One more - in “SSH Hidden Service” - some code blocks have grey background, while others don’t have any.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            The code font being tiny is not intentional, I would like for people to be able to read what I’ve written :) - Which web browser are you using?

                                                            One more - in “SSH Hidden Service” - some code blocks have grey background, while others don’t have any.

                                                            Not sure what I did to break it like that, hopefully fixing it also fixes the weird horizontal scrolling on mobile too.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              I am using Brave on macOS. Seems like by default “monospace” is quite tiny. I’ve seen some people declare: font-family: monospace, monospace; and that improves things with the font size for some reason …

                                                              1. 1

                                                                That’s very weird! It also increased the size on Firefox for Linux too.

                                                          2. 2

                                                            I assumed it’s hard to get .uk domain, why else would .co.uk be so popular? How does it work really? The website is clean and minimalistic, I like it.

                                                            1. 3

                                                              If I remember right, it only became possible to get .uk quite recently (that is, within the last decade). Before that, .co.uk was the go-to and it’s still pretty ingrained.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                I assumed it’s hard to get .uk domain, why else would .co.uk be so popular? How does it work really?

                                                                Before some time in 2014, you couldn’t register a .uk domain at all. Between 2014 and 2019, you could register a .uk domain that matched the .co.uk/.org.uk/… you already owned. After that it’s a free for all :)

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  Didn’t know that, thanks.

                                                              2. 2

                                                                This is fantastic! I love the simplicity of it.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I can’t find anything wrong with this site. It looks great!

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I have no idea how I’m going to incorporate my blog once I finally get around to publishing some of the posts: https://cosmo.red/

                                                                  Would love some tips.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    I think this is interesting, and should perhaps be applied to programming languages as well.

                                                                    Hyper-inefficient programming languages like Ruby, Python, Haskell, etc. produce far more CO2 than, for example, C.

                                                                    1. 5

                                                                      Hyper-inefficient programming languages like Ruby, Python, Haskell

                                                                      I hope you realize that Haskell’s performance is much closer to C than Python. Haskell usually ranks around the likes of Java in language benchmarks. Either way you look at it, it doesn’t deserve being called “Hyper-inefficient”…

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        I think it depends on how much energy is used developing and compiling code vs energy used during all times the program is run. I expect that equivalent C and Haskell programs take similar amounts of energy to run, and that the Haskell one takes a lot more energy to compile, but less time (and therefore less idle-time energy) to develop. This would make them similarly energy-expensive for most use-cases.

                                                                        Scripting languages may require less develop-time energy, but more run-time energy. If run only a few times, they’d use less energy than would be spent writing, compiling, debugging, and running a C program. Run many times, they would lose out to the finished C program.

                                                                        1. 3

                                                                          That’s actually a very relevant point. My first reaction to your comment was, “but who cares, you build only once”, but that’s not true. I have a beefy laptop that I’ve bought specifically to support a comfortable Haskell development experience. The IDE tooling continuously compiles your code behind the scenes. Then my team also has a very beefy EC2 instance that serves as a CI environment, it builds all the branches all the time. Then we’re also employing various ways of deploying the application and that also means it gets built in various ways per release image. All of that probably adds up to an energy consumption amount that’s comparable to a significant number of users running the application.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            Then we should include maintenance cost as well. I believe that in a lifetime of a program the energy put into the initial development is only a part, most probably a smaller part, of the energy needed to maintain it: bug fixing, updates, etc. In this case, theoretically, Haskell should have an advantage, because the language, due to its type safety restrictions, will force you to make less mistakes, in design and in terms of bugs. I don’t have any numbers to support these claims, it’s just gut feeling, so don’t take it too serious.

                                                                        2. 4

                                                                          There actually have been studies on that question, eg: https://greenlab.di.uminho.pt/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/sleFinal.pdf

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            I love that paper. If you’re looking for a quick heuristic, energy efficiency strongly correlates with performance. Compare those numbers to these: https://benchmarksgame-team.pages.debian.net/benchmarksgame/which-programs-are-fastest.html

                                                                        1. 3

                                                                          Nearly 1/3 of all internet traffic is pornography. Maybe we should focus on the lowest-hanging fruit.

                                                                          1. 4

                                                                            I can imagine that needless video-conferencing is also a contributing factor, especially with all the online classes/lectures/meetings over the last few months.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              I guess needless video-conferencing is much better than needless in-person meetings (by car, train or airplane). Can porn similarly be replaced be actual sex to reduce the carbon footprint? Maybe just replace video porn with still pictures or written erotica (read on eink, like kindle).

                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                Video-conferencing can at least more often than not be replaced by auto-conferencing, and perhaps a slide-show that isn’t transmitted in a video format.

                                                                            2. 2

                                                                              Got a source for that? As far as streaming entertainment goes, YouTube and Netflix seem to make up the plurality. As of 2018, YouTube and Netflix combined make up about 26.4% of all global internet traffic.

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                Various pornographic websites are certianly visited more frequently than Netflix, but the statistics seem to vary. I found this estimate claiming somewhere between 4%-30%. But either way, there are more problems than just bandwidth usage.

                                                                            1. 31

                                                                              I’ll microoptimize my personal site once all proof-of-work blockchains are abolished.

                                                                              1. 26

                                                                                I get your point, but also… Be the change you want to see.

                                                                                1. 11

                                                                                  I think by running this calculator on my site I generated more CO2 than the supposed 1-2 visitors per month do while visiting my page.

                                                                                  Also this example calculations. While neat, completely useless. When I move the visitors to 19500 per month it jumps to “2 trees” everything below that is “1 tree”. Well, yes, sure, that’s only a factor of 1000…

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    Presumably the article author has more traffic than that.

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      I certainly hope so, but this more related to what gerikson said, also note the last line of the post:

                                                                                      What’s the carbon footprint of your website? What steps will you take to reduce it?

                                                                                  2. 6

                                                                                    I’m very sceptical of the calculator but it says my personal site would use 8kWh with 10k visitors per year. 1 watt per hour.

                                                                                    That’s nothing!! Focus on things in your life which matter, e.g. if you don’t run your air conditioner as much, you’d easily save 8kWh in just a couple of days.

                                                                                    Or don’t eat a steak and you’re able to run my website for like 4 years.

                                                                                  3. 8

                                                                                    @yarmo & @cos

                                                                                    Both your point postulate that micro-optimizing your personnal website is significant to “save the planet”.

                                                                                    Not going into politics here, but from a computer-science point of view everything is about trade-off.

                                                                                    Is the effort spent optimizing your personnal website has a valuable impact on the problem your trying to solve ?

                                                                                    One could argue that personnal websites are definitely not a significant part of the energy used nowadays, and far lower than blockchains related stuff.

                                                                                    That’s how I understand @gerikson point of view.

                                                                                    But then again, it does not forbid you to optimize your website if you feel like it.

                                                                                    1. 4

                                                                                      Is the effort spent optimizing your personnal website has a valuable impact on the problem your trying to solve ?

                                                                                      One could argue that personnal websites are definitely not a significant part of the energy used nowadays, and far lower than blockchains related stuff.

                                                                                      To take a counter point, you frame your point as coming from a computer-science point of view, but you didn’t acknowledge that a lot of innovation in CS happens via grass routes movements where individuals work on a problem, and then industry adopts those solutions. If people start optimizing their personal sites, maybe they will take what they’ve learned on their own time and start doing it more at their job as well, maybe those people present their work at reducing COGS by reducing energy usage for some Top 500 websites. That could have real impact on the industry via knock-on effects. In my point of view this is how we as individuals can effect change in the industry, by working on problems and helping to disseminate them to the masses.

                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                        a lot of innovation in CS happens via grass routes movements where individuals work on a problem, and then industry adopts those solutions.

                                                                                        Industries adopt a solution not just because its trendy or because the common people use it, but more propably because this a profitable solution.

                                                                                        I understand your point, but that is a lot of “maybe”.

                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                          Industries adopt a solution not just because its trendy or because the common people use it, but more propably because this a profitable solution.

                                                                                          The point is that you can increase profits by reducing the energy consumption of the software you are running in your own, or co-located data centers. Many companies throw money at the problem instead, people who have experience tuning for lower energy usage are, and will continue to be valuable assets to their teams. Practicing on your own projects is a useful and worthwhile exercise.

                                                                                          I understand your point, but that is a lot of “maybe”.

                                                                                          ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

                                                                                      2. 2

                                                                                        Both your point postulate that micro-optimizing your personnal website is significant to “save the planet”.

                                                                                        Actually, what I said is quite literally the opposite. Micro-optimizing my website will not save the planet. But if I’m not willing to go the extra mile, how can I expect a larger website with significant climate impact to do that without being a hypocrite?

                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                          Hi @yarnmo,

                                                                                          @puffnfresh answer what I would say too.

                                                                                          And like I said previously, that should not stop you from doing it !

                                                                                        2. 1

                                                                                          Both your point postulate that micro-optimizing your personnal website is significant to “save the planet”.

                                                                                          Nope. My point is that the existence of worse offenders does not let you off the hook for your offenses. If you voluntarily maintain an excessively inefficient system which can be easily optimized, that’s on you. Just because there exist others who maintain massively more inefficient systems, that does not excuse the inefficiency of yours.

                                                                                          Is the effort spent optimizing your personnal website has a valuable impact on the problem your trying to solve ?

                                                                                          The effort is minimal. In the case of a personal website, what is one trying to solve? Sharing their identity and ideas with the world? Why should that ever require layer upon layer of excessively wasteful JavaScript-heavy frameworks?

                                                                                          One could argue that personnal websites are definitely not a significant part of the energy used nowadays, and far lower than blockchains related stuff.

                                                                                          Yes, this is necessarily true. However, it is irrelevant to the point I was making. If you care about waste, then reduce waste. Don’t wait to reduce waste until those more wasteful reduce theirs.

                                                                                        3. 10

                                                                                          Yeah! And I’ll ride my bike to work once all trucks are abolished! And I’ll stop littering once all illegal dumpers are prosecuted! And I’ll recycle my plastics once all oil refineries are shut down! And I’ll go vegan once all poachers are lynched!

                                                                                        1. 7

                                                                                          Without any changes, I’m scoring quite okay : https://www.websitecarbon.com/website/raymii-org/

                                                                                          • Hurrah! This web page is cleaner than 94% of web pages tested
                                                                                          • Only 0.06g of CO2 is produced every time someone visits this web page.
                                                                                          • Over a year, with 10,000 monthly page views, this web page produces
                                                                                          • 7.39kg of CO2 equivalent. The same weight as 0.05 sumo wrestlers and as much CO2 as boiling water for 1,001 cups of tea
                                                                                          • 1 tree This web page emits the amount of carbon that 1 tree absorbs in a year.
                                                                                          • 16kWh of energy That’s enough electricity to drive an electric car 100km.
                                                                                          1. 7

                                                                                            I just redesigned my site to use less resources, including images. Beat you by 4 percentage points :-)

                                                                                            1. 4

                                                                                              I redesigned mine quite a while back and while I wish I could say I beat both of you the best I can do is as tie between @johnaj and I. https://www.websitecarbon.com/website/jeremy-marzhillstudios-com/

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                I also redesigned mine awhile back in the name of speed and simplicity. I guess that’s good for the environment because apparently I beat everyone ever: https://www.websitecarbon.com/website/cosmo-red/

                                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                                  Haha that’s cool, I wonder what type of car that is, I want one:

                                                                                                  • 0kWh of energy
                                                                                                  • That’s enough electricity to drive an electric car 2km.
                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    Maybe it’s got a sail? It’s a sailcar!

                                                                                                  2. 3

                                                                                                    My results tell me my car would move 1km further, but I’m using sustainable energy, so who wins that?

                                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                                      Heh, I vote for you. Where do you host your website?

                                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                                        Strato, but mainly because I get 200GB for 5 Euro a month.

                                                                                              2. 4

                                                                                                I have a small personal, statically-generated blog which managed to score 99% by emitting 0.00g.

                                                                                                https://www.websitecarbon.com/website/danso.ca

                                                                                                Which makes me wonder about the methodology, obviously.

                                                                                                A weakness of this method is that it does not account for the cost of building the website from the markdown and Haskell source files. Compiling a program is not free, nor is running it. But maybe that cost is negligible compared to serving the website after it’s made?

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                Is this recent spat of ending development a Corona casualty, a natural course of things with better reporting, or people in the time of Corona having the time to mull things over and pick the best path even if it’s extreme?

                                                                                                1. 4

                                                                                                  I think you won’t get a truth for this. But it could simply be that some people are forced to think more about this with corona and have to decide. Otherwise they might get overwhelmed by all these problems.

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    It’s likely mostly independent of COVID, but I have as much evidence as everyone else here. Another element might be just how public the recent resignations have been, validating other maintainers already considering making the same decision.

                                                                                                    It’s certainly some combination of all these things (and maybe a few more), but what are the weights? That’s the missing half of the question I’m most curious about. I’d love it if someone did some kind of journalistic investigation, interviewing these maintainers and charting up statistics.

                                                                                                1. 7

                                                                                                  i also think it is a problem, and imo one of root causes is the belief that browser NEEDS TO support x and y and z and all the “standards”, created by committee of 1.5 corps.

                                                                                                  i personally believe that one should be able to use ANY browser, and the site should bend over backwards to accomodate.

                                                                                                  working mostly by myself part-time for a couple of years, i was able to support almost every single browser i,ve tried, including classics like nn3, nn2, mosaic, lynx, ie3, opera3, and many others.

                                                                                                  ironically, chrome is the one which gives me the most grief and head-scratching

                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    Mosaic and Netscape Navigator 2 didn’t support CSS right? Does this mean you did most layouts with table elements? Since you’d be limited to HTML 4, I’d be curious what didn’t work in Chrome (unless you built your site with one giant blink element).

                                                                                                    1. 4

                                                                                                      I’m assuming support doesn’t mean an exactly equivalent experience, just an acceptable one. That’s basically what we do with IE11 at this point – ignore minor cosmetic issues as long as a user can complete the main goal of the site with that browser.

                                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                                        as swehren said, my goal is accessibility and functionality. i do have optional table layout, but mosaic does not support table either.

                                                                                                      2. 1

                                                                                                        Are you talking about http://shitmyself.com/ ? If so, that’s really cool!

                                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                                        does system76 do smartphones?

                                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                                          I’d love that so much. Until then, there’s the PinePhone as well as the Librem 5, but there’s a reason I buy laptops from System76 instead of PINE64 and Purism. I’m looking for reasonable power at a reasonable price.

                                                                                                        1. 4

                                                                                                          What lies at the end of this arms race?

                                                                                                          1. 5

                                                                                                            Oh wow, I’ve been misusing and abusing flags without realizing. I figured they were analogous to downvotes on other platforms. Changing the UI to make this more obvious was a good move. Thank you so much for your hard work!

                                                                                                            1. 12

                                                                                                              It looks like this is closed source? That seems a bit of a shame for a Linux product.

                                                                                                              1. 5

                                                                                                                I’ve got to respectfully disagree.

                                                                                                                I think having vendors provide and support their closed source products on Linux represents a major step forward for the platform.

                                                                                                                I am super pleased that a fully open alternative in this space exists, but I use and love 1Password and am chuffed to hear about this, because right now I have to use sub optimal browser extensions or WINE hacks to approximate this.

                                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                                  Yes! I agree wholeheartedly. It’s a very good sign for the Linux desktop platform as a whole that companies are willing to write and support closed-source desktop applications. Unlike Windows or macOS, Linux desktop machines are much more diverse and backwards compatibility is much less guaranteed. It’s also worth mentioning that distributions and communities usually step up to support particularly important pieces of proprietary software (think Steam) on unsupported distributions and configurations.

                                                                                                                  Since 1Password is commercial software, making it available has to make financial sense. While they might be supporting Linux primarily as a marketing ploy to technical people instead of as a result of the number of Linux users, I think it’s more likely that they’re doing this because enough existing users would install it on Linux machines if given the option. That means that there has to be some significant overlap between 1Password users and Linux users.

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                                                                                                                    Yup that’s absolutely true. They get the question often enough that there is (or was) a blurb in their support thing about using WINE as a hack-around, or at least their was before they came out with 1PasswordX for Chrome/Firefox.

                                                                                                                    1PasswordX is an OK solution, but I really REALLY missed the native app as I use it for things like secure note storage and credit card autofill as well.

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                                                                                                                  Yeah, right? What does this even offer that Bitwarden doesn’t?

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                                                                                                                    Probably nothing, but that’s not the point. The point is that there are a decidedly non zero number of users who are already bought in to the 1Password ecosystem for any number of reasons, and providing first class support for them on Linux feels like a super clear cut win to me.

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                                                                                                                      As someone working to migrate off of apple platforms, I’m pretty happy this exists!

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                                                                                                                        Two thing I like in 1Password compared to BitWarden are 1) the secret key which is totally random, used to encrypt/decrypt the database entries and only stored locally and 2) TouchID and FaceID support on macOS and iOS.

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                                                                                                                          (Disclaimer: I switched from 1Password to BitWarden about 15 months ago, mostly because it had become clear that there was no way to stay up to date with current 1P features without also having Agile host my password store. I didn’t mind paying them, but I’d like to bring my own sync, please! It was also getting trickier to keep running 1Password under WINE, and most of my daily stuff had moved to a Linux desktop. So my basis for comparison might be out of date.)

                                                                                                                          BitWarden’s iOS Touch ID and Face ID support has gotten quite good lately. They also integrate with iOS password management much better than they used to. I have never tried touch ID on a mac so I don’t know if it works with that.

                                                                                                                          The things I still miss from 1Password are:

                                                                                                                          • Much better password capture in the browser
                                                                                                                          • Ability to sign into the background daemon once and have multiple applications (browsers, desktop clients) access it
                                                                                                                          • Better integration with system locking
                                                                                                                          • Richer password generation settings

                                                                                                                          The things I prefer about BitWarden are:

                                                                                                                          • All source code is available
                                                                                                                          • Easily self-hostable, either using their resource-intensive official package or the community supplied bitwarden_rs
                                                                                                                          • Good command line client. (I think 1Password has one now… when I switched, their command line client was new and required you to host your database on Agile’s service, which was a deal breaker for me.)

                                                                                                                          The hard tie-in to the service component is really what stops me. I wish Agile would copy BitWarden in that regard and let people self-host but pay them the fee. I cheerfully do that because I want to support them, I just don’t want them to have my passwords.

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                                                                                                                      True … False … FileNotFound

                                                                                                                      Also, whenever I switch back to the tab this link is in it runs some sort of fancy “rendering” progress bar. Not sure what’s up with that.

                                                                                                                      I also am a bit disappointed it’s not a top 3 of the most valued structs in C. Oh well…

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                                                                                                                        Also, whenever I switch back to the tab this link is in it runs some sort of fancy “rendering” progress bar. Not sure what’s up with that.

                                                                                                                        It’s @tedu’s clever protest against JavaScript by way of progressive “dehancement.” Simply disable JavaScript, and the page functions beautifully.

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                                                                                                                        What’s the state of open source apl? What can I do with it?

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                                                                                                                          • GNU apl

                                                                                                                          • ngn/apl

                                                                                                                          • dzaima/apl

                                                                                                                          • I’m working on an APL implementation which will hopefully be out within a couple of weeks

                                                                                                                          • The state of the art, dyalog, though not open source, is free

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                                                                                                                            There’s also J, which is completely open source and doesn’t require new symbols.

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                                                                                                                              How does it compare to APL in terms of the points raised by the linked article?

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                                                                                                                                Favourably. The notation is not as good, but it’s not bad (though some people claim so). If performance or commercial use is important to you, it’s probably the best option (unless you care to pay dyalog’s licensing fees).

                                                                                                                                (I’m not aware of any formal benchmarks comparing them, but dyalog apl and j have very high performance; most other implementations are lacking in this respect. K (shakti and kx both) also has excellent performance, but is optimized for different uses; primarily fin-tech and time-series data, so they do well with tables and large sequential data.)

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                                                                                                                              GNU APL is free and can be used as a standalone interpreter or linked as a library. It doesn’t support some of the newer built in operations that Dyalog has and sticks close to the ISO spec.

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                                                                                                                              Nice of them to delete the data

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                                                                                                                                Right? Imagine if they had exfiltrated everything; this could be much worse. This seems like it might be a greyhat effort to get people to secure their databases, especially given the whole metaphor of cats dropping things off of tables and filling the empty air with their meows. That’s just too funny to be an accident.