1. 1

    I understand that Mozilla is no longer involved in the development of Thunderbird so I am not sure if calling it “Mozilla’s Thunderbird” is fair. That was probably done to free up resources for other commendable initiatives such as integrating proprietary services into their browser.

    1. 2

      It’s not mozilla corp, but it’s still mozilla foundation. They are making a new company for it now: https://blog.thunderbird.net/2020/01/thunderbirds-new-home/

      1. 1

        I’m glad they freed up resources for Firefox Quantum. Prior to that point, Firefox was completely unusable for my purposes.

      1. 5

        Hm… for me using Thunderbird I can accept Outlook invites perfectly fine. The organizer even gets a reply when I accept. What am I missing?

        1. 1

          Maybe they are running an outdated version. Doesn’t lightning come bundled with thunderbird these days?

          1. 7

            This feels like an ancient article that’s accidentally got a new date. Lightning was first released in 2004 and was integrated in Thunderbird some time around 2011. This article talks about it as a new feature.

            1. 6

              This seems plausauble, consider one of the comments:

              I used Thunderbird for a few years because it supported newsgroups, but as soon as I stropped using them, I’ve gone back to Outlook Express (now Windows Mail, in Vista). It’s just a lot nicer to use, even if it does lack some features.

              It seems like the author just bumped that “published” dates by 16 years, for some reason.

        1. 16

          I’ve been bitten once by the modern use of JSON files in firefox. I don’t have a bug report at hand, but the issue is that since the whole file gets rewritten on save, a crash at the wrong time can make you end up with an empty (0 bytes) file. This happened to me with the password database, and it was quite hard to fix. I ended up creating a new profile. SQLite databases tend to resist damage a lot better.

          1. 5

            That seems like a fixable problem. The trick would be to write the file with a temporary name, then fsync, then rename it over the top of the old one. Depending on when it crashes, you might lose the changes, but you shouldn’t get torn writes.

            1. 1

              rename() should be atomic on any sane posix filesystem. might be able to skip the whole fsync() call altogether.

              1. 3

                But then the atomic rename may be of an incomplete file…

                1. 1

                  Someone correct me if I’m wrong, but for my own understanding it sounds like the process is:

                  • Write output to temp file
                  • One way or another ensure temp file gets committed to disk
                  • Rename temp file to real file

                  And then in the case of a crash, start over from the beginning? That may lose you data in a crash but will always be consistent. Otherwise you need to verify that the temp file is valid before doing stage 3, or detect a crash and attempt to recover something, or something along those lines…

                  1. 1

                    Perhaps I’m mistaken and doing dumb things, but I’ve intentionally induced power faults testing my temp to rename over method without fsync and it seems to work, vs opening and editing or just overwriting the file underlying.

                    1. 3

                      iirc ext4 filesystem actually inserts an fsync for you in this case because it is such a common mistake.

                  2. 1

                    When you’re dealing with crashes, all bets are off

                  3. 1

                    Funny you say that, this is exactly what FF does for downloads.

                    1. 0

                      To encourage less SQLlite usage, providing an API to manage this (compressed JSON files, loaded+saved via tmpfile/fsync/rename) seems a sensible approach, and probably not much more effort than writing this guide.

                        1. 1

                          Thanks, interesting, the non-default version (if you provide a tmpFile and ask for ‘flush’) seems to do this safely. I wonder if a higher-level API would be of use (save/load a json object, no need to provide tmpfile name etc)

                          The description of the ‘flush’ argument suggests it is doing an fsync(), rather than using stdio and doing ‘fflush’, but if so the terminology is confusing.

                          I would check, but I don’t want to check out all of firefox and but I’m having difficulty searching up “NativeOSFileInternals.cpp” to look.

                            1. 2

                              Try searchfox.org

                    2. 2

                      A similar thing can happen if you run out of disk space. During writing the file will first get pruned, then some program will use up all the available space in the meantime and your write will fail with the end result being an empty file. This can be avoided by creating a temporary file in the same location as the destination file and then renaming it.

                    1. 2

                      Kinda interesting “please stop ignoring basic Internet netiquette about crawlers”. Seems like there are very few regulations surrounding the use of crawlers. So what would even compel someone to adhere to general etiquette in the first place? Especially if you are Facebook

                      1. 4

                        Isn’t causing a denial of service against the law in many countries? If it gets out of hand, they are going to get sued. But I think this was simply a bug that is going to end up fixed soon.

                        1. 4

                          But I think this was simply a bug that is going to end up fixed soon.

                          If so, that’s probably only because this person had a blog, took the time to write about it, and made it to Hacker News. I find that pretty depressing TBH. There should be some way to report abuse.

                          1. 3

                            Not sure, if you read the HN thread there are stories and similar reports that go back years (e.g. this or this). Perhaps it’s a bug, but they’ve been extremely lax in fixing it.

                          2. 2

                            Especially if you are Facebook

                            When profits are on the line and shareholders to answer to, netiquette goes out the window.

                          1. 9

                            About underlining links, it may be useful to stick to conventions. Practical Typography makes links hard to spot, I don’t think this is a good idea to follow their advice. We have now more control on how links are underlined, notably the width and distance from text. Also, most browsers are now able to skip the descendants when underlining (which makes underlining quite OK visually). Also, sticking to standard underlining allow you to have a different color for visited links and not visited links. See https://www.nngroup.com/articles/change-the-color-of-visited-links/ for details on this.

                            1. 2

                              Agreed, links are extremely difficult to fathom on Practical Typography.

                              Underlining may not be done thing in print, but on the web it’s synonymous with links; that’s why I decided to keep them.

                              People expect either different colour text, underline, or both. So I stuck to convention on that one.

                              1. 1

                                Agreed. I like to sometimes drag my mouse over lines when reading the text and there were non-trivial number of times where I pressed on a link by accident while reading “Practical Typography” without knowing my cursor was on a link. It’s fancy but I think a poor design choice. And the separation between internal and external links is quite inconsistent.

                                Personally, when it comes to hyperlinks, I don’t like them at all. When reading I typically check maybe 1 out of 100 or so hyperlinks, maybe less. Which is disproportional compared to the distracting effect they have. There seems to be no trivial way to mark them without standing out. I don’t even like underlines. The old fashioned approach of having a list references at the end is what works best for me.

                                1. 1

                                  I am also distracted by texts with too many links. On my website, I only use color for the underline, not the text (something supported in most browsers now). I am keeping blue for the color of underline when not visited and I use black when visited. On hover, the text color is changed to highlight them and purple is used for visited links.

                                2. 1

                                  On my site, I do it like wikipedia does: links are coloured blue, and underlined only when hovered. They are easy to spot, everybody understands they are links, and they don’t make the text ugly.

                                1. 2

                                  There’s a [patches][dwmpatches] thing in there that looks like it should be a link but didn’t render as such.

                                  1. 1

                                    Yikes, thanks for catching that. Fixed in https://github.com/Xe/site/commit/9be1ac7b46967971d5aac4b511a1319f24a944bc and it should roll out soon.

                                  1. 2

                                    That screenshot with the performance / acessibility / … score at the end, what tool is it from?

                                    1. 2
                                    1. 3

                                      Jesus Christ this article is complete trash.

                                      Two thirds of the article is pointless propaganda, only after a good 60% the author actually starts explaining how this zettelkasten system works.

                                      What’s the point? Why are you even trying to convince me? Are trying to sell me a piece of furniture later?


                                      Regarding the system itself: I am tempted to say that a good wiki software like confluence would do the same, but the real advantage of the furniture is that it’s likely going to keep working in 20 years. I wouldn’t bet the same in confluence (or MediaWiki or whatever).

                                      1. 4

                                        Mediawiki is 18 years old. Confluence is 16. Considering the Lindy effect, there is a good chance they will still work in 20 years.

                                        1. 4

                                          Well, I wouldn’t call Confluence “good wiki software” any more than I would call Visual Basic a robust development environment, but I take your point. My database of personal and professional notes for the past 15 years has been a private instance of Dokuwiki and the more I read about Zettelkasten, it just sounds like a curated personal wiki like I have, once you get past all the gushing.

                                          1. 2

                                            Editing in confluence is light years ahead of pretty much everything else.

                                            1. 1

                                              Does dokuwiki have backlinks and tags?

                                              1. 2

                                                Backlinks yes, tags no. Maybe with a plug-in.

                                                1. 1

                                                  Thanks.

                                                  So perhaps one could have a page called “Tag:Something” that only holds a description of what could have been the tag “#Something”. All pages that are related to “Something” should have a link to “Tag:Something” on their taglist, and the backlinks on page “Tag:Something” will show relevant pages.

                                                  It’s a bit like Wikepedia’s “Category:Something”, isn’t it.

                                            2. 3

                                              The space around the concept “Zettelkasten” has all the features of an emerging marketing space. There are already multiple software solutions. Just wait for the custom-made physical slip-boxes, the note cards in different colors, the books, the pay-for videos, and the webinars.

                                              1. 7

                                                As I wrote here a couple weeks ago:

                                                The Zettelkasten thing sure has been hitting the zeitgeist hard these last few months - right around when I started poking at those ideas myself after kind of edging around them for a decade or two. It’s interesting to feel a burgeoning nerd methodology cult wash over and through the system of my own thinking. I was a lot less self-aware the last few times this really happened to me (the first big wiki wave back in the era of thousand-line Perl CGI wiki software comes to mind), and I never got drawn into GTD or Agile on any deeply felt personal level, so it’s almost like a new experience.

                                                That said, I think it’s also been quietly bubbling along in the background of the note-taking nerd memespace for many years now. I think I first ran across the word “Zettelkasten” on Taking Note, a blog I’ve probably been following since 2008 or so, but index card approaches that are clear relatives to it in one way or another have been popping up now and then for most of my adult life, I think. It just seems to have reached a critical mass lately. Or, as you say, become an emerging marketing space. Establishing itself as a working methodology-cult ecosystem with an in-group vocabulary, defined rituals, canonical texts & standard arguments, and mystique about True Process. You can see it happening in realtime over at the Zettelkasten Forum, which is run by the authors of The Archive.

                                                …and which is an interesting forum to skim now and then. I don’t want to be disparaging, this is just how these sorts of cultural phenomena seem to unfold. I’m trying to stay self-aware about all this while I spend a fair amount of time building up my own system of notes.

                                                (I did some ranting about notes about notes / writing about writing and so forth last night, inspired partly by this thread and others like it.)

                                                1. 3

                                                  The memory of your comment inspired mine.

                                                  There will always be a market for selling tools that magically replace hard work and time with a “process”. I’m not really judging. My work/life doesn’t require anything like Zettelkasten, but I’m sure it would interest my dad, who has been buying old handheld computers just to keep using their database software.

                                              2. 4

                                                It’s weird too, that it sells the idea, then starts explaining how it works, then it goes back to selling it again for a few more paragraphs! And only after that second set of propaganda it finishes the explanation.

                                                1. 3

                                                  It’s not well written, but all the tools linked in the article are free (and most of them not harvesting your data).

                                                  1. 2

                                                    What’s the point? Why are you even trying to convince me?

                                                    I think that it is targeted towards a particular audience: “The main component of The Writing Cooperative is our publication, which is one of Medium’s largest. […] Everything we publish falls within our mission statement: Helping each other write better.” But yeah, the tempo was a bit choppy and it reminded me of one of those “weird thing” articles. Then with big promises it dumps a board game on the reader without explaining the rules.

                                                    It seems like there is something promising in Luhmann’s system, but I don’t want to risk getting a hand-me-down cargo culted version of it.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I drew some wood (expecting it to fall) and it stayed floating in the air, can I remove it?

                                                    1. 1

                                                      Got it, clear button!

                                                    1. 18

                                                      With the amount of friction every proposed changed involves, it’s impressive that anything gets done in emacs development. “We should get icons that don’t suck” ah but licenses (which later turns out, doesn’t really matter, because icons are not code). “Qt5?” no, what if we make GPL4? “what if we make ^C to copy by default?” No, let’s try a welcome dialog or…

                                                      Then people act surprised when tree-sitter-emacs development happens outside the emacs mailing list.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        With the amount of friction every proposed changed involves, it’s impressive that anything gets done in emacs development.

                                                        Indeed, that is the biggest part I got out of this. I’m more surprised there hasn’t been an ecgs fork of emacs that can move forward faster than its “gcc” and show a new way.

                                                        What I really want is just a faster editor or one that can do blocking i/o transparently. Having random things block all input while they wait for $THING to do whatever its doing is annoying af.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          it’s impressive that anything gets done in emacs development.

                                                          It’s notable that the vast majority of development on Emacs happens in 3rd-party libraries. This is mostly on purpose; making everything go into the core would be an enormous bottleneck and waste of time. Of course there are exceptions, but generally when they are more slow-moving that’s OK.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          cadey, not good. :)

                                                          1. 1

                                                            How so? I was kinda tipsy when I wrote this, but I’m very open to suggestions on how to improve.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              You’re distributing something that people within the decomp community have asked to stop propagating… I’m not going to tell you do anything, but don’t be surprised if you get something in the coming months about it.

                                                              And it wasn’t done by “someone”. It’s a collective work (the decomp). People were also running the decomp on PC months ago; there were some interesting videos of speed runs running at 40,000fps.

                                                              1. 13

                                                                Is this trolling? People who’ve decompiled a commercial game think other people shouldn’t re-use “their” sources?

                                                                1. 6

                                                                  I suspect it’s more like people who have decompiled a commercial game think other people shouldn’t do things that might draw unwanted legal attention.

                                                                  1. 5

                                                                    Decompilation of pokémon games has been happening in the open on github for many many years. This shouldn’t be so different.

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      There are a few major differences, and probably more that others will think of. Note that all my comments are to protect, rather than attack. I fully believe that everyone should have access to such a wonder project, but the time is not now…

                                                                      • The Pokemon games as we all know very very well, are for Game Boy, a system much older than the N64. Time doesn’t matter.
                                                                      • The Pokemon games were originally coded in assembly. A decompilation is different from a disassembly.
                                                                      • The bar for compiling, modifying, and doing practically anything is much higher since everything is assembly.
                                                                      • SM64 is for the Nintendo 64; iQue Player is the last true N64 console, with its release in 2003 and stopped support in 2016, just 4 years ago. Nintendo is still making money on their IP. Super Mario 64 DS released in 2004, discontinued 2013. Invalid point when reflected on.
                                                                      • SM64 was originally written in C. As we see it’s much easier to build and modify. To the point where people can easily load the IP in a web browser, unlike Pokemon, which was a ROM.

                                                                      While I’m not a subject matter expert, I think anyone with a search engine can see Nintendo is not done with this IP and is rigorous, for good reason. Remember there are people that work there, that need to feed families, and Nintendo makes good games. In terms of practices I think they are much better than Disney. I’m aware of the Twitch and YouTube controversy they pulled off awhile back, while not ok, is understandable. I think they’ve eased on this with the introduction of “Nintendo’s Creators Club”. They say it’s ok to upload content, but if you make money off it, you gotta sign up to the club. Again totally understandable.

                                                                      1. 4

                                                                        The N64 is like 8 years older than the original Game Boy, and both are over 20 years old.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Yeah you’re right, time has nothing to do with it.

                                                                        2. 3

                                                                          Pokémon emerald for the Gameboy Advance was released in 2004, the same year as the Mario 64 NDS remake: https://github.com/pret/pokeemerald

                                                                          While it is a much more manual process than the mentioned N64 project, and the focus is more on modifying the game than on porting, many functions are rewritten in C! I don’t think the cases are all that different.

                                                                          Nintendo will obviously go after the people setting up those mario 64 web-browser ports, or plug and play windows binaries, but the people working on decompilation and ports should be pretty safe. At most, they will get a C&D, like cadey said up in another comment.

                                                                          PD: GBA games in the browser don’t really need much of a decompilation. Web-based GBA emulators are readily available and bundled with their ROMs. Since that’s piracy like any other, they have to avoid getting taken down.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            While it is a much more manual process than the mentioned N64 project, and the focus is more on modifying the game than on porting, many functions are rewritten in C! I don’t think the cases are all that different.

                                                                            You are saying being able to target browsers, android, rpi, directly, is all that similar? No, of course you’re not. But then you can’t say they are all that different. They are different.

                                                                            “At most they will get a C&D” - are you a lawyer? Have you dealt with such a case? Because such a case has never existed and you are making a claim which has huge impact if wrong. “should be”, “at most”, “I dont think”…

                                                                            Anyway again, I’m not telling anyone to do anything (as I originally said). It is just disappointing that I’m seeing people go against “code of honor” here. I guess it means nothing to a lot of people, and they just care about showing off things - not that that’s a problem in general, but when told otherwise, it’s straight up disrespectful.

                                                                      2. 2

                                                                        And I dare to think it is due to past experiences of sharing these decompiled artifacts, and trying to recover from it.

                                                              1. 7

                                                                I love the idea too but the implementation is a bit scary in my opinion. The return (!!strchr(req, '/')); forbids slashes in file paths given to open(2) so I think that this is safe against directory traversals, but there are so many subtleties that can cause security bugs that I’m not sure to trust this code that doesn’t even look at req[4] in respond()… And if you look carefully at main(), buf[len-1] = '\0'; can erase an already-read character. Again, this shouldn’t be an issue in practice, but hey, this is C. It’s a language where security issues are way to easy to introduce. I requires discipline. I think that it’s really easy to introduce a serious bug in such code with a lot of subtleties.

                                                                On the other hand, if this is jailed inside a KVM virtual machine with nothing else, why not. Lots of companies and people rely on scary code in production being properly jailed.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  The file has changed quite a bit since I looked at it a few hours ago! Both versions are scary to me though. I think this is a good example of why it’s a good idea to reach for a language other than C when dealing with strings, untrusted input, and the like. What would the equivalent Zig code look like?

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Among the damages caused by fragmentation, according to Bernard, are upstream maintainers “adding a permanent dock, icons on the desktop, re-enabling the systray” to the DE.

                                                                  I guess that’s supposed to be downstream maintainers, or distro maintainers (to the dismay of upstream gnome).

                                                                  I can’t find a way to leave comments or email the author though, pretty much all the links on that website end up bringing you to a mastodon instance.

                                                                  1. 10

                                                                    I’ve never used the mouse with the terminal, but I’m not sure why

                                                                    I don’t use it either, but I do know why: I like having the default copy/paste text behaviour work anywhere in terminals. For example, the other day I had to copy a PID from htop on a remote machine, and the mouse support prevented that. It’s like web pages where you can’t select and copy text.

                                                                    You can reimplement this, but a lot of apps don’t, or have different behaviour. In general, I find it more annoying than helpful.

                                                                    1. 11

                                                                      At least in urxvt and xterm Shift+Mouse allows you to select text even if the application tries to react the the mouse events.

                                                                      1. 4

                                                                        Ah, this works in st as well; I didn’t know this, thanks!

                                                                        1. 3

                                                                          In konsole, all gtk teminals and mintty this works as well. I would be surprised to find a terminal emulator that did not support this.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            At least in urxvt and xterm Shift+Mouse allows you to select text even if the application tries to react the the mouse events.

                                                                            Is it possible to invert this behavior? I would prefer if the mouse worked normally, except when shifted, then it can be captured by the application.

                                                                          2. 2

                                                                            I wonder if you can disable it on a per-operation basis? In iTerm for example, if you alt-drag, it doesn’t send anything to the program, it just highlights the displayed text.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Yeah, I use option-drag on iTerm to use the terminal native selection when in e.g. vim with mouse mode on.

                                                                              Also I’d highly recommend knowing about using option-cmd-drag — it will let you do block selection of text.

                                                                              This can be very useful when you’re in e.g. tmux or vim with split windows and you only want to select a block of text not whole sets of “lines” in the terminal if that makes sense.

                                                                            2. 1

                                                                              Yes that makes sense, and is something I didn’t quite get. The author of ble.sh [1] brought that up on the Oil zulip. ble.sh contains a terminal parser in pure bash and so it could also handle the mouse :)

                                                                              [1] http://www.oilshell.org/blog/2020/03/release-0.8.pre3.html#serendipity-with-blesh

                                                                            1. 4

                                                                              I was also confused about the name of last week’s gfetch utility, and this week’s rsfetch. I think it’s an interesting glimpse into a subculture I’m not very familiar with. Are there websites/subreddits where these sort of screenshots are frequently shared?

                                                                              1. 6

                                                                                I’m guessing they’re used in /r/unixporn?

                                                                                1. 5

                                                                                  Yes. The combination of the PC enthusiast (and gaming) community, the Unix ricer community, the mechanical keyboard enthusiasts, and other similar subcultures likes these tools. You would use these types of screenshots to show off your computer specs and your fancy tiling window manager configuration, or you might even include an entire photo of your desk and working environment. It’s the same concept as people who like to make their cars look pretty.

                                                                                  I’m somewhat surprised that so many of the people here haven’t heard of these tools and communities. Even if the whole concept is kind of silly, the pretty desktop screenshots have gotten a lot of people to try out tiling window managers, which is cool.

                                                                                  For the rest of you who don’t know what I’m talking about, here’s an example neofetch output on my computer:

                                                                                  jack@jackdesktop ~> neofetch
                                                                                                     -`                    jack@jackdesktop 
                                                                                                    .o+`                   ---------------- 
                                                                                                   `ooo/                   OS: Arch Linux x86_64 
                                                                                                  `+oooo:                  Host: Aspire GX-781 
                                                                                                 `+oooooo:                 Kernel: 5.6.7-arch1-1 
                                                                                                 -+oooooo+:                Uptime: 1 day, 23 hours, 15 mins 
                                                                                               `/:-:++oooo+:               Packages: 1271 (pacman) 
                                                                                              `/++++/+++++++:              Shell: fish 3.1.0 
                                                                                             `/++++++++++++++:             Resolution: 1920x1200 
                                                                                            `/+++ooooooooooooo/`           WM: sway 
                                                                                           ./ooosssso++osssssso+`          Theme: Breeze [GTK2/3] 
                                                                                          .oossssso-````/ossssss+`         Icons: breeze [GTK2/3] 
                                                                                         -osssssso.      :ssssssso.        Terminal: kitty 
                                                                                        :osssssss/        osssso+++.       Terminal Font: Consolas 
                                                                                       /ossssssss/        +ssssooo/-       CPU: Intel i5-7400 (4) @ 3.500GHz 
                                                                                     `/ossssso+/:-        -:/+osssso+-     GPU: Intel HD Graphics 630 
                                                                                    `+sso+:-`                 `.-/+oso:    Memory: 2936MiB / 15934MiB 
                                                                                   `++:.                           `-/+/
                                                                                   .`                                 `/                           
                                                                                                                                                   
                                                                                  
                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    Oh, I’ve definitely heard about these. In fact, I actually use something like this myself called gkrellm. It’s old school, but I use it because it’s a generally always visible on my screen, so it infuses an ever present awareness into my brain about what my machine is doing (high CPU usage (possibly high system time), high disk usage, high network usage, high memory usage and so on). It’s surprisingly effective as a first approximation when I wonder, “what the fuck is this tool doing?”

                                                                                    I’ve also built my own window manager (that is tiling) and love mechanical keyboards. (Enough that I have some unopened ducky shine keyboards because I love them so much and I’ve had so much trouble finding them. So when I did find them, I bought more than I needed.)

                                                                                    I’ve also heard of tools like conky.

                                                                                    I’ve just never heard of them referred to as “fetch” tools. That’s all.

                                                                                    1. 6

                                                                                      I don’t know if screenFetch was the first to use fetch in the name, but many other similar scripts followed with the same convention. Neofetch, ufetch, and a few others. They are not realtime GUI programs like gkrellm or conki to be updated in real time but simply scripts that fetch and display that information before the screenshot.

                                                                                    2. 1

                                                                                      Personally, I tend to use these fetch programs more to find out say, how much memory I’m using, than to share screenshots.

                                                                                  2. 5

                                                                                    Apart from the mentioned /r/unixporn, there’s the Desktop Threads in the 4chan boards /g/ and /w/ and a few IRC channels. And of course, there are threads here on Lobsters too: https://lobste.rs/s/yagld8/lobsters_battlestations_screenshots (look around the screenshots and you will see many such *fetch programs).

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      I didn’t realize lobsters had desktop threads :o

                                                                                  1. 4

                                                                                    While I’ll continue to use Firefox to keep developers accountable to other browsers and to do my part in maintaining a healthy market share (apart from a host of other reasons), I genuinely think it’s different this time. Browsers are doing a lot to maintain an open standard and things like ActiveX are no longer plaguing the browser market. DRM continues to be the proprietary evil it is, but other than that it’s a lot better than the IE days.

                                                                                    1. 16

                                                                                      Though nowadays the open standards can be a bit… misleading? A lot of them feel more like edicts from Google to enable features for ChromeOS, like WebUSB.

                                                                                      1. 6

                                                                                        I was happier not knowing that WebUSB is a thing. Thanks. :/

                                                                                      2. 1

                                                                                        Standards don’t seem to prevent web app makers from looking at you user agent and telling you to switch to Chrome. Google’s applications in particular are infamous for serving different code (with different performance and bugs) to different browsers.

                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                        https://www.cosarara.me/ I don’t often write, but when I do that’s where it goes.

                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                          He also makes fun of just how terribly slow perl6 was back then. “Garbage collect! Garbage collect!”

                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                            I can’t seem to find a list of supported platforms, but the main page says macOS so it’s certainly not linux-only.

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              It was primarily developed on Linux, but it should (mostly) compile fine on macOS or BSD. Windows support is flakey, however.