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    Does it support live updates, that is, releasing new code without restarts?

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      Not yet, we are looking forward to having HCS in the long term.

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      If you are interested in using your skills to have a positive impact on people’s lives, Outschool is hiring senior software engineers.

      I would be happy to answer your questions.

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        As long as there is no Firefox phone, I am not interested. I need a full ecosystem that respects my privacy and Apple ecosystem is the closest.

        I wonder if they can bring Firefox phone back. There is WebAssembly now, and that can be a game changer.

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          That would be exciting.

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            As far as i know the reason why firefox phone fail was not that it was too slow, but because they fail to take a significant market share. So webasm is likely to change nothing on the problem.

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            My personal split of languages by how quickly I was able to have something working, with no specific order:

            Couple of hours

            • PHP
            • Javascript / Node.js
            • Go
            • Zig
            • Prolog
            • Erlang
            • C#
            • Kotlin
            • Swift

            Years of going back and forth with little success

            • Lisp
            • Haskell
            • C / C++
            • Java
            • Python
            • Ruby
            • Scala
            • Objective-C
            • Typescript
            • Rust

            There is one general and one specific reason for that; both personal.

            The general one is the balance of language, standard library, tooling, community, etc. It is what made me happy and productive in the former list. And it was the opposite for the latter.

            The specific one, as far as I see, is macros/templating provided in the language. The more powerful it is the less comfortable and productive I felt. It was harder to learn the syntax and semantics. It was harder to go through standard library and to make sense of how language features are used. Finally, it was much much harder to read other people’s code and to not feel falling behind.

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              If I understand the direction correctly, the following should be possible:

              • WASI providers: browsers, hardware, cloud services, games
              • Documents/Data with their own code as WASM bundles; downloadable from Internet.
              • Services on top of WASI as WASM bundles, basically shared libraries; downloadable and cacheable.
              • WASM bundles declaring which WASM services they need in order to operate or execute any advanced features

              So, from this, I can have my documents bundled with their code running on my WASI web browser to read, on my WASI enabled editor to edit, downloaded to my WASI enabled printer to print, shared with friends in a WASI enabled MMO game, hosted by an edge provider to share globally, and last but not least, archived on webarchive with all its dependencies, for future generations to reuse.

              And many things can be WASM bundles:

              • My online identity
              • Profiles and avatars
              • Photos, videos, journals, blog posts, scientific papers
              • My wallet which can include a blockchain algorithm in its own code
              • My custom UI components

              It is basically still the web but now my document/code can run in more places more efficiently, by making most of available resources, with less vendor lock-ins.

              Future looks bright.

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                I used vim a lot especially when IDEs were slow and resource heavy. They are still resource heavy but a modern computer can handle them pretty well in these days.

                An IDE provides a full view of your project with lots of navigation, introspection, and refactoring capabilities. These are priceless and more important than fast text editing capabilities.

                Vim served me well and I appreciate it if I am in a slow network or low resource environment. However, these are rare occurrences. Finally, I love it nostalgically, reminding me my old days. But I moved on long time ago.

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                  This is promoting a technology for technology’s sake. Sorry but this mentality keeps hurting our community.

                  Javascript is the best language when you want to start your frontend development for a product about which you have no idea if it is going to succeed or not, or it is going to be a short lived project. And this is 99.99…% of projects.

                  NodeJS is pretty strong if you build a single page web app. And if not, it has similar pros and cons like Python, Ruby, PHP, and etc.

                  Whole benefits mentioned in the article are available with Typescript but even that is a big overhead as an investment.

                  I believe once a software engineer really focuses to their product instead of techno day dreaming, they don’t even come close writing such articles.

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                    To support my work, you can buy Better Blocker on iOS and Better Blocker on macOS or become a patron.

                    What is the difference between him selling a product on a closed market place like App Store and all these companies and organizations being sponsored by the very same companies they criticize/fight?

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                      Selection bias in action. On the other hand, we easily make fun of systems running Win 95.

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                        Windows 95 had a bug where it’s uptime couldn’t exceed 49.7 days as it would crash .. sometimes criticism is well earned

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                        I don’t see anything that prevents anyone from fixing these issues on Electron. What is all flame war about?

                        I am not happy with Electron apps right now, but it does not mean that they cannot get better. The language, the VM, and the SDK, they are all open source and widely adopted, actively developed.

                        Isn’t it exciting that in the near future whether we use Windows, MacOS, Linux, or BSD won’t matter anymore?

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                          IMO, sure, but only if that doesn’t mean that they’re all dragged down to the lowest common denominator.

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                            I think VSCode proves that with enough effort, Electron apps can be very, very good. I’m not sure how much of the MS tweaking can be applied generically to the platform itself, though.

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                              Isn’t it exciting that in the near future whether we use Windows, MacOS, Linux, or BSD won’t matter anymore?

                              There is no official support for any BSD in Electron…

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                                I keep bouncing off of learning Rust, working through the Rust Book and the Gentle Introduction, and losing the will to continue.

                                I think my problem is that there’s so much to the language in terms of syntax and semantics, and to read and really understand existing code, you have to know all of it, from lifetimes to macros, because all of the code out there uses all of it. You can’t understand a subset and use that to bootstrap your understanding of the rest of it, it’s all or nothing. This is really, really far from my experience with other languages. Some of it may be my age and decreasing neural plasticity, but surely not all of it (I’m learning Common Lisp right now and not having any comparable problems).

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                                  I feel the same way.

                                  I had similar experiences with Scala, too.

                                  My observation so far is that with other languages, it was much easier to design my APIs. With Rust, I kept changing my API because I didn’t understand the restrictions of the compiler. The final API was not what I had in my mind at all, with lots of leaky abstractions or compromises.

                                  I didn’t give up but I am not in a good position either. I checked ReasonML recently and felt much more at home.

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                                    I’ve been working with Rust some, and I don’t really agree with this. It may be hard to really understand some existing code without knowing everything, but you certainly don’t need to know it all to write basic programs. I haven’t really learned macros yet, and still consider them to be basically magic methods. I’m not super-used to working with lifetimes, but you can ignore them for like 90% of code. Most of the rest is very similar to every other type-checked language with generics out there. The only exception is having to think more about ownership and when to move or borrow, but the compiler often helps you figure out what to change when you’ve done something the borrow checker doesn’t like.

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                                    I definitely prefer pagination as most infinite scrolls are poorly implemented. However, infinite scroll with good back button support is not so hard to achieve. Pagination is also not a silver bullet either if you want to go back and forth in the result set itself.

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                                      Outschool (YC W16) is the marketplace of small-group online classes for kids, K-12. Our live video chat format makes awesome learning experiences available to kids around the world.

                                      We are a product-focused team of seven in SF, with experience in education, marketplaces, software, and operating online services at Udemy, Amazon, Airbnb, YC, Square, Google, and several startups. We have an exceptionally sane work culture for our early stage: no egos, boondoggles or fake urgency. We pay attention to our users and prioritize carefully, start simple, run experiments, then iterate.

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                                        Grass is always greener on the other side. For any other industry, we can find good and bad examples. Nuclear powerplants were considered rocksolid in Japan and now see how people see it. Delta rockets were always seen as stellar but now see how people feel about Falcon vs Delta rockets. 70s/80s were not any better or worse than today, if 80s industry was so good and fair, we would not see any movement like GNU.

                                        It is all business.

                                        My rule of thumb for engineering is that engineering is the transfer point of scientific knowledge to business. An engineer should understand both sides sufficiently well and act accordingly. Usually what I see is, though, that engineers fall in love with science and hate business.

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                                          I’m sorry I don’t understand what this is. What would I do with this? Is this similar to like Electron?

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                                            My understanding is that it is an alternative to Node written by Node’s original creator.

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                                              He tries to target a certain slice of nodejs usage: secure execution of short living scripts like command line tools, scientific calculation programs.

                                              The only thing I have found interesting is that using sandboxes to achieve that. However, why can’t NodeJS do that, too?

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                                                because of the way it’s designed, as described in the talk. changing that would break way too much stuff, like libs which rely on linking to C in order to function.

                                                one cool thing about Deno is that it seems like one could make a “codepen”-style JS code pasting/collaboration service really quickly, and not have to worry about sandboxing the code execution like you normally have to do. the fact that its package management works by using URLs makes it even easier. just import React from "https://unkpkg.com/react-0.0.1/react.js" and you’re done. no messing around with package managers, no worrying whether it’s down, no worrying about depending on “yet another package ecosystem” if you’re coming from other places like Python or Ruby.

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                                              What are your thoughts on https://proton-native.js.org?

                                              I really like React as a view layer and looks reasonable to me to be able to access native ui libraries through Javascript like being able to use Python for similar purposes.

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                                                The underlying problem is that an average young individual has so much free time that they cannot fill it with meaningful activity, the next best thing they have is social media and games.

                                                Parents are too busy with their lives and never in time they had so much responsibility to be 24 hours available to their children.

                                                My hope is that people will look for building more local communities where they and their children come together and ease the burden on both on them and their children. A rethought school system or a more organized unschooling culture may provide that.

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                                                  I disagree - I had oodles of free time as a king and spent it playing outside with other kids or reading books.

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                                                  I have a hard time in understanding how decentralized systems are better at protecting me from abusive government agencies, groups, and even individuals? With big online companies, it is not perfect but, as a citizen I have more tools to ask for accountability.

                                                  And even for daily stuff, how can I trust “decentralized” systems run by some individual who may or may not be good at following security best practices etc. Again, with big online companies, again it is not perfect but, I have more power as a citizen.

                                                  I think centralized systems scale better when it comes to power / responsibility balance.

                                                  I vote against decentralizing lobster but happy to read more counter arguments.

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                                                    It’s more about people outside the US. Big Corps like Reddit or Google basically follow the US law and the US law mostly protects only US citizens.

                                                    Instances in the fediverse follow local law (which is why usually people don’t federate with Japanese instances that allow NSFW material) which is great if the US law is silly in your culture/country.

                                                    The easy answer is simply that you pick a community, not a corp for your server. If you pick a corp for your server you should pick on in the same legislation as you are in.

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                                                      It’s even good for people within the US; for instance, I can pick a fediverse server in Germany and know that the admins will be required by law to ban nazis even though I don’t live in Germany.

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                                                        I agree that federating big platform like reddit, Twitter, or YouTube makes sense because these platforms host multiple communities with conflicting norms and expectations regarding privacy, speech, etc. In an ideal scenario, individual reddit nodes could choose to omit subreddits they found objectionable or implement their own local censorship regimes (a la USENET).

                                                        That said, I am inclined to agree with ctulek that lobste.rs is best suited to central hosting. In scale, lobste.rs is more like an individual subreddit than the reddit platform. We pick our community each time we choose lobste.rs over other forums discussing similar topics.

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                                                          I agree, yeah, Lobsters is more like a single sub but it could be useful if lobste.rs could federate…

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                                                      It is very likely that AWS, or Linux, or many other services/projects are used by governments for doing bad stuff. I don’t understand what is so different in this case.

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                                                        In this case, you are being personally enlisted to aid directly in the immoral activities, not just using a service that other people also use.

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                                                          In this case, you are being personally enlisted to aid directly in the immoral activities

                                                          In the same vein, you’re personally enlisted to aid in killing innocent Afghanis through paying taxes. Oh, and ruining people’s lives for possessing a certain plant, etc.

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                                                            These are obligations imposed on you by the state, which cannot be opted out of, and are quite indirect compared to contributing to a database of pattern recognition whose only purpose is targeted murder.

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                                                              Not sure what you mean, but the fact remains: through taxation, we’re all enlisted to aid in doing all kinds of nasty/crazy/immoral shit that we wouldn’t voluntarily aid in doing. That’s why they need to take our money by force.

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                                                                Yes, that fact remains. This article is talking about opting out of something voluntary. I’m not seeing the point of confusion.

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                                                            Thanks for the reply. I read the article couple more times but still don’t see the connection.

                                                            As far as I understand, if you use AGPL there are thousands of companies who won’t use your library either.

                                                            The author’s open source projects don’t seem to be directly used for drone technology, either. Even then their argument looks weak to me.

                                                            I support protesting Google for their actions in involving in immoral projects. And I appreciate the author of this article for suggesting one another way to do that but it looks a very weak one to me.

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                                                              I support protesting Google for their actions in involving in immoral projects. And I appreciate the author of this article for suggesting one another way to do that but it looks a very weak one to me.

                                                              I certainly don’t disagree that its persuasive power is low; I only argue there’s a big difference in “participating in directly aiding an morally defective project (like reCaptcha hypothetically asking you to select drone targets) with ones own abilities (human image recognition)” and “using a service or project (like AWS) that is also used by morally defective actors (like governments)”. The latter is impossible to avoid (like taxation, as @rama_dan points out), the former possible.