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    Recently started Cormac McCarthy’s ‘Blood Meridian.’

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      Oh, that’s on my bookshelf. I look at it all the time and think I should start it. My friend said it’s one of the darkest books he’s ever read.

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        Heh yah the writing style makes it a bit tricky to follow, I think. Maybe it’s cause I always start reading at 2 in the morning lol…

        on that doom country vibe lately

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        Yeah that’s… that’s a read right there. I’ve read some dark stuff over the years, and that tops 90% of it. Good stuff once you get used to the writing style.

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          That’s one of my favorite books. Have you read anything else by McCarthy?

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            nope first one

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              The Road is my favorite.

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                That’s a fantastic one, and quite different from Blood Meridian. Much quicker read, easier to digest, but so emotionally evocative and moving. He’s such a great writer, definitely one of my favorites. Everything I’ve read by him has stuck with me big time, particularly:

                Blood Meridian

                The Border Trilogy

                The Road

                No Country for Old Men

                Outer Dark

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            I recently came across [URL=http://fractalsoftworks.com/]Starsector[/URL] and will, hopefully, spend some time playing it this weekend.

            After spending more than a month on Neal Stephenson’s “Seveneves,” I couldn’t continue anymore. It was too technical, too long and I often myself in a bad mood on my commute. I enjoy science fiction, but this book was too much slow for me.

            Now, I’m finally tackling Don Winslow’s “The Border,” a book I’ve been waiting to read for months. After Seveneves, this book is a breath of fresh air. A lot of action and plot movement. I’m hoping to make good process on it this weekend.

            On Sunday, my friends are hosting a pizza and board game night at their house. That should be a fun and relaxing time.

            Otherwise, the usual chores and errands. MAYBE getting some C programming exercises done.

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              After spending more than a month on Neal Stephenson’s “Seveneves,” I couldn’t continue anymore. It was too technical, too long and I often myself in a bad mood on my commute. I enjoy science fiction, but this book was too much slow for me.

              I posted recently about giving up on Cryptonomicon. I remember exactly when I gave up on Seveneves: during a long and boring description of the orbital path of a meteoroid / speck of rock that shot through a spaceship and (I think) killed some minor character. By the time I got to the relevant event I had just stopped caring. Put the book down and never came back.

              I would have previously considered myself a fan of Neal Stephenson. I’ve read most of his books, even the Baroque Cycle. But I don’t think I’ll read another one, or re-read any of them.

              I’ve never heard of Don Winslow, I’ll have to check out some of those books :)

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                I remember exactly when I gave up on Seveneves: during a long and boring description of the orbital path of a meteoroid / speck of rock that shot through a spaceship and (I think) killed some minor character. By the time I got to the relevant event I had just stopped caring. Put the book down and never came back.

                I think I know which event you’re talking about. That was around the time I gave up, too. I’m glad to know I’m not the only person who dropped the book on the sole fact that Stephenson makes an interesting topic dull as hell.

                Honestly, I loved the doomsday plot. But, the amount of details that go into the technical stuff that eventually play no role in the final outcome – which I read on Wikipedia – is a shame.

                Ron Howard is slated to direct a Seveneves movie, and I’m curious to see how it’ll translate to the screen.

                I’ve never heard of Don Winslow, I’ll have to check out some of those books :)

                Oh, you should. I recommend “The Power of the Dog,” which is the first of a three-part series about a DEA agent’s hunt for a major, Mexican drug lord. Think Catch Me If You Can meets Narcos.

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                Winslow’s Cartel books are stunning. Enjoy!

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                  Thanks! I really liked The Power of the Dog and loved The Cartel.

                  I’m excited to see how these will translate to the silver screen. Ridley Scott is allegedly slated to direct a movie.

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                  You just reminded me I meant to figure out how to get Starsector running on my NixOS laptop this weekend, thank you! …I don’t suppose you came across the game due to watching a certain recent youtube video?

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                    I did. I thought Sseth’s video was great and highlighted the enormous possibilities the provided in this game.

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                    Sorry to hear you didn’t like Seveneves! It’s funny how people just react to things differently but I literally could not put that book down because it was such an exciting and engaging story to me, and I quite enjoyed learning so much about orbital mechanics and physics in context of the story. How far did you get into it before throwing in the towel?

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                      Yeah, I really gave it a shot. I dropped the book about 400 pages in, a little after the Hard Rain occurred and Markus took over Izzy.

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                    Been working as a programmer (Perl/Python, mostly the former) for a bit like the last 7 years.

                    With full-time employment I don’t think I ever put up more than 5 hours of work per day. The rest have been meetings, discussions or just general office distraction – lunches, coffees, etc. It felt frustrating to waste 8 hours a day (plus commute) to do what could’ve been done in 5 or less. My theory is that employers know perfectly well that pretty much no one can consistently produce 8 hours of solid work a day and that’s one of the reasons that they fill IT offices with toys: table tennis, poll, consoles – all these amenities just to admit to themselves that the 8 hour work day is an impractical relic but somehow they still want everyone around for a third of their lives.

                    I’ve moved to self-employment around 3 years ago and I’m not looking back. I average between 3-5 hours a day, I get paid by the hour, I do my job and then I switch to other things instead of wasting time. The rates are a bit higher than on full-time employment so it mostly balances itself out, allowing me to live a comfy life without feeling like I’m dangling my feet under the table for the sake of someone’s outdated ideas.

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                      Any tips on successfully going self employed? I’m wanting to make a similar move after several years working at large corporations, for these exact reasons (among others).

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                        It may be a good idea to start with something niche enough to have few competitors but still common enough to find customers. Having something to prove you can do it may help, for example, an open source tool related to the job, or some documentation. It’s also often a unique combination of skills that really helps getting hired rather than a unique skill. Class4 (transit) VoIP is hanting me for example—there aren’t many people who know something about VoIP and are also programmers and can architect and implement automation solutions. And don’t be afraid to openly advertise your services, people need to know you are available to get an idea to hire you.