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    Why?

    I use Vim for almost everything. I wish I didn’t have to say almost. My usual workflow is to open Vim, write, copy the text out of my current buffer and paste it into whatever application I was just using. vim-anywhere attempts to automate this process as much as possible, reducing the friction of using Vim to do more than just edit code.

    I don’t quite understand the rational behind this? Why should one perfer vi-editing when, for example, writing prose? It would seem like all you’d get would be typing i before you start writing, and pressing the escape button when you’re done, plus maybe a more preferable color theme?

    Personally, as a guy who generally uses Emacs (and for that reason structurally can’t relate to this issue ^^), I see vi being nice when working on code-like or in some sense structured data, which might or might not have some.concept of words and paragraphs. Configuration files, logs, scripts, etc. things you want to easily and quickly manipulate, on a regular basis. (Maybe that’s the reason I don’t use Vi(m), since I see the editor as a kind of “sword”, with wich you quickly strike once, and change whatever you neee, instead of having it open for extended periods of time, and fully living within it, like Emacs. This is also why I don’t like extending vim, since I want it to stay clean and fast)

    But back to this project, it seems to me, that when I’m writing stuff outside of my editor or a shell, it isn’t this kind of text vi keybinding are good for. Maybe the author has a different experience, and if that’s the case, I’d be very interested in hearing what “reducing the friction of using Vim to do more than just edit code” is supposed to mean.

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      I don’t quite understand the rational behind this? Why should one perfer vi-editing when, for example, writing prose? It would seem like all you’d get would be typing i before you start writing, and pressing the escape button when you’re done, plus maybe a more preferable color theme?

      • dis deletes a sentence
      • '' reverses your last jump
      • Search highlights show if you overused a word
      • c is great for editing and revisions
      • Visual blocks help with adding formatting
      • Move by paragraph and move by sentence
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        Most of these tricks seem more like hypothetical advantage, that look great in a list, than real justifications. How often does one reverse their last jump? Or moves the cursor through a text sentence by sentence? Most the other tricks can be more or less easily emulated by a combination of the shift/control and the arrow keys (or on the mac and some GTK versions using built in emacs keybindigs). The “normal” text entry interfaces offered by operating systems are not ot be underestimated, after all.

        So unless one says “I don’t want to learn any other keybindings that vi’s”, one could understand why people would use this, but it still doesn’t appear to be a good reason to me.

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          How often does one reverse their last jump?

          I go back to previous editing positions all the time in Vim, using g;

          Some other Vim features I find useful for prose:

          • autocomplete from terms in current document
          • ya” to copy quoted text
          • dap for cutting and moving paragraps
          • zfip for termporarily hiding a paragraph under a fold
          • digraphs for inserting em dash—tricky to write otherwise.
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            I use all of these tricks regularly when editing prose. And these were just the ones I immediately thought of when reading your thing. There are plenty of other commands I use all the time. None of them may be strictly necessary but it all adds up to a big quality of life improvement.

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          I don’t quite understand the rational behind this? Why should one perfer vi-editing when, for example, writing prose? ….

          I’m not a vi-user, as you might guess, but I can say that a proper text editor is a real boon for writing any sort of text, whether code or light fiction. Word processors are such hostile environments for real production of anything, in my experience.

          You say you generally use Emacs - don’t you prefer it for non-code things too? I assume vi(m)-people must feel similarly about their paradigm.

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          Continuations have been used to study natural language phenomena: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/22693619-continuations-and-natural-language