1. 1

    Can you import data from http://beermenus.com? I’m already got a bunch of beers added there.

    I tried to register but it said my username (jcs) was too short. Boo.

    Also, the link to your twitter account on the homepage of the site goes to an incorrect profile.

    1. 1

      I don’t have any data import functionality currently. As far as the username thing goes, yeah.. I don’t think there’s actually a good reason to limit the length of that to 4 characters or more. I’ll push an update on that.

      As far as the twitter link goes… Woops… embarrassing…

    1. 1

      Sounds pretty cool, but it looks like the site is down at the moment – looking forward to checking it out!

      1. 2

        My DNS funds happened to run out at the perfect time. Site’s been up for a few hours now!

      1. 4

        No, no, no, no. Normal people don’t always use the email field properly. The might put the username in the email field and the email in the username. Just check for an @. There is no email in the world outside your server that you can sent to without an @.

        1. 2

          I did that for a time (which I mention in the article), but it’s still a superfluous check on top of an activation email. If your users are typing the wrong values into your registration form, perhaps you need better labeling or placeholder text? Display an error that the activation email couldn’t be sent. But why add superfluous checks?

          1. 2

            Because it’s a lot easier to validate a form than write code that 1. catches bounce emails 2. sorts out which are invalid emails and which are transient problems 3. flags the user so they don’t generate more bounces 4. prompts them to re-enter their email address until they do.

            1. 1

              Unless you just delete users who haven’t activated their account by email within a time span that works for your app.

              1. 1

                Provided you don’t care about losing users who think “wow, this service sucks, they can’t even send an email.” Forcing people to leave your site before they can come back means some of them won’t come back. Somewhere, somebody probably even has stats to confirm that.

                1. 1

                  That’s likely possible, except you can have the same problem with the server side validation. What his article suggested and we both agree on is a client side warning.

        1. [Comment removed by author]

          1. 3

            It’s hard to make this claim without knowing how the Reds in the channel are helping the Yellows. They could, by all means, be merely providing help in arriving at the answer before becoming eventually frustrated and just giving up either by moving on or providing the answer. As a member of the channel, I can confirm that this usually happens.

          1. 7

            If somebody has been entering a chat channel almost every day for 18 months and has still not absorbed knowledge that is (for all intents and purposes) being entirely handed to them from others, they should be seeking out other forms of learning if not abandoning the subject altogether. People need to be able to recognize when they are not picking up on something, whether this is programming or any other hobby/line of work. This is not to say that this person is dumb or stupid, merely that Rails (and perhaps programming altogether) is probably not for them. Should they be advised forcefully via a kickban from #rubyonrails? Probably not. But at this point, I wouldn’t be afraid to be blunt with them. Tell them that they clearly are not picking up on the topic and suggest they try out another activity that they’ve been wanting to do.

            1. 2

              I would lean more heavily on the “they clearly aren’t learning in a format that is best for them” response.

              1. 2

                I agree that helping them realize their limitations is important to convey using verbiage that’s sensitive to their feelings is important. In a high number of cases, it takes a bit more directness to properly explain to the individual that they should look for even more fruitful outlets with which to better expand their knowledge.

                I don’t think bans are necessary unless offense has been aggrieved in an intentional way by the foreveranoob. I feel like sometimes we lose the chance to have great interactions with wonderful people because of the medium we use doesn’t really speak well to the way they communicate when put in the situation they find themselves in.

                We, the regulars of #rubyonrails and other community outlets, should do our bests to distinguish between being a catalyst for issues and being knowledgable helpers. Being cognizant of people’s individual learning tools and doing our best to work with them when possible is valuable, even if sometimes not feasible.

                A simple story for non-empirical evidence. An individual who had been working in a framework that my community finds distasteful had come into the channel and wanted to understand some things about rails. She got a little frustrated at the situation, and I decided to give her a few ‘tough love’ comments. She took them rather well, sometimes people do and don’t, and it made her more driven to find her answers. I didn’t hand them to her, I didn’t hide them, I just gave her enough information to enable her to look deeper with a bit more clarity. She needed to know what to look for, not the answer, nor did she need someone to deride her chosen path for achieving her goal at the time.

                Today, she’s a really great friend of mine, also a helper in our channel, and a very enjoyable rubyist. (She quit .NET and works as a rubyist by day now.) Happy endings for all.