1. 1

    The sooner people donate the sooner it goes away.

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      Don’t we call that line of logic protection racketeering? ;-)

    1. 10

      I don’t think it’s fair to judge a 30 year old graphics system against today’s applications. X’s network transparency worked well for the low resolution displays and simpler applications that existed in 1987.

      Just because it’s not useful any more doesn’t mean it was never useful and an overall failure.

      1. 3

        I agree entirely. I relied on remote X sessions with all kind of graphical stuff from web browsers to TCL/TK programs exported back to my client right up to 2000.

        This article is ill-considered.

        1. 2

          I don’t think it’s fair to judge a 30 year old graphics system against today’s applications.

          Why not? We fairly judge 90s crypto by modern standards.

          I think that while X may have been well-designed by the standard of its day, it was indeed a failure because it ended up optimising for the wrong things.

          That doesn’t mean that X is unusable or not the best alternative — just that as a protocol it has failed to live up to its fundamental goals.

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            I think it’s fair to ask whether X meets today’s requirements or not, but it shouldn’t be called a success or failure judging solely by today’s standards.

            X is outdated, but it was still a successful project.

        1. 4

          Linked in the article, but I feel it’s worth pasting here.

          1. 2

            Hey @pushcx et al!

            Firstly, thank you for continuing to work on the code base to improve the site! Bravo! :-)

            I’m concerned about removing the Your Threads feature; I rely on it all the time to get me to threads I’m following; I would really prefer that to stay if possible please.

            Just my 2¢.

            :-)

            1. [Comment removed by author]

              1. 1

                If you think about it, north does not equal up!

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South-up_map_orientation

                :-D

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                I am a software engineer working for Red Hat on OpenStack, both on the upstream codebase and on Red Hat’s downstream Red Hat OpenStack Platform product. I must clarify that I announce this for disclosure, I am not a member of the press team.

                Red Hat OpenStack Platform is certainly widely adopted by plenty of customers ranging from large scale compute users to telcos who like the NFV side of things and smaller scale shops who just want their own private cloud.

                I am not at liberty to disclose many customer names, for that I’ll refer you to our PR department, but here’s something I found that was in our public success stories section of our website. That being said, OpenStack is a popular platform with a very wide install base across industries.

                For high level information about Red Hat OpenStack Platform, see here.

                For the upstream organization, here.

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                  This is a terrible idea. All lobste.rs meetups should be in Maine.

                  1. 5

                    I think you meant to say “Nova Scotia”. ;-)

                    1. 1

                      Farewell to Nova Scotia, the sea bound coast

                      1. 2

                        Farewell to Nova Scotia, the sea bound coast

                        Thanks for broadening my horizons. :-)

                        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farewell_to_Nova_Scotia

                        1. 1

                          Haha, no problem, it’s one of my favorite folk songs :)

                    2. 2

                      That’s a funny way to spell Shediac, New Brunswick.

                    1. 1

                      I’d be interested.

                      1. 2
                        • Herman Melville - Moby Dick
                        • Yuval Noah Harari - Sapiens
                        • Ted Simon - Jupiter’s Travels
                        • Martin Meredith - The Fortunes of Africa
                        • Kurt Vonnegut - Slaughterhouse Five
                        • Conn Iggulden - both the Emperor and the Conqueror series
                        • Steven Pressfield - Gates of Fire, Last of the Amazons
                        • C.J. Sansom - Shardlake series
                        • Thomas Asbridge - crusade books
                        • Philip Pullman - The Book of Dust
                        1. 21

                          To be honest, most of my goodwill towards Tim Berners-Lee (which there was a lot of, by the way) went away when he started shilling for web DRM. Requiring w3c compliant browsers to ship closed source BLOBs in order to correctly display w3c compliant web pages is against the very core of the open web; not to mention how the w3c wouldn’t even protect security researchers who want to see if there are security issues with said BLOBs. I know Berners-Lee probably isn’t responsible for every one of those decisions, but he publicly (and probably internally in the w3c) argued for DRM.

                          For further reading, here’s a great (albeit long) article from the EFF: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2017/10/drms-dead-canary-how-we-just-lost-web-what-we-learned-it-and-what-we-need-do-next

                          1. 7

                            Computers, the Internet, and the web represent some of the greatest innovations in the history of mankind and the fruition of what could have only been a fantasy for billions of our ancestors for thousands of years. To see it so quickly, in the course of a few decades, and thoroughly corrupted by the interests of corporate profits is profoundly sad. I am severely disappointed to have dedicated my life to the pursuit of mastering these technologies which increasingly exist primarily to exploit users. DRM is a thread in a tragic tapestry.

                            1. 3

                              At this point my usual plea is, judge what’s spoken, not by whom it’s spoken. TBL’s authority is one thing, and the merit of what he has to say about that “Solid” thing is quite another. The idea feels very sane to me, although I don’t see a clear path of shoving it past the influence of all the silo-oriented companies like Facebook and Google.

                              1. 2

                                “At this point my usual plea is, judge what’s spoken, not by whom it’s spoken.”

                                This sentiment was drummed into me as a child and ordinarily I would strive to do this to a point, but the topic of putting locks on the open web by way of DRM is to me related to the apparently opposed mission of “solid”.

                                Arguing for decoupling data from applications provided by corporate giants in the interests of user control seems absurd when he just played a major part in removing transparency and control from a user’s web experience.

                                I’m not quite sure what to make of this.

                                1. 2

                                  Did you consider the possibility that DRM could also work in reverse? The Digital Rights Management of individuals. I think that is the underlying motivation for allowing DRM: to protect assets and information. Users can not freely copy media to which they have no right of ownership, and conversely, companies can not freely copy user data to which they should have no right of ownership.

                            1. 3

                              This is cool, and I am going to sound like a jerk, but, the big and really important aspect of the curl project is lib curl, not the curl command, which this doesn’t address. Given the choice of language, it doesn’t seem like you’re going after that which is a bit disappointing. Cool project, though! I’ll put it on my list of clients to mess around with.

                              1. 1

                                You’re totally right; you don’t sound like a jerk at all. I keep thinking of how to address this massive short fall.

                                I’m open to ideas and contributions too.

                                Thank you, sincerely, for the comment.

                                :-)

                              1. 2

                                Aside from being written Go instead of ye olde C, what are the advantages of kurly over curl?

                                1. 3

                                  Sounds like they missed a chance to go with gurl instead.

                                  1. 3

                                    Hah - that was indeed considered for a femtosecond or two. ;-)

                                  2. 2

                                    Pasting from my answer to a similar question over on reddit, so I apologize for the slight redundancy, but…

                                    :-)

                                    Very good question; thank you for asking.

                                    A primary benefit is one of hindsight. kurly has the luxury of being a couple of decades newer than curl and as such has taken advantage of two core things.

                                    1. It’s written in a modern safer language, so hopefully won’t exhibit myriad memory safety security issues that curl is plagued with. 2) Doesn’t need to support as many legacy features such as FTP, Gopher, etc, that no one uses anymore. This reduces code complexity and of course less complexity is implicitly good.

                                    As stated on the README, this is an alternative to, not a replacement for, curl. :-)

                                  1. 10

                                    About to wind down for a long Christmas break, going to travel to Mexico to see my family. Haven’t been there in a long time! I really need a dose of Mexico again to feel “Mexican” once more. I try to keep up with Mexican culture online, but it’s hard to “stay Mexican” when you’re not submerged in it. I’m not sure if other expats/immigrants can relate to the experience.

                                    Speaking of being Mexican, I went to watch Coco, and it’s a surprisingly accurate pastiche of Mexico (except that everyone mostly speaks English, of course). A lot of the underworld architecture was obviously inspired by things like Chapultepec Castle or the Postal Palace or the street layout of Guanajuato. I have only found this last one overtly acknowledged by the filmmakers.

                                    I’ve also been having lots of fun with Advent of Code. I am learning so much about D now that I’m really using it in earnest. I plan to write a blog post after Christmas, “Advent of D”, detailing what I’ve learned. The experiment has both strengthened my love for D and shown me some of its weak points (and no, it’s not the GC). I’m really excited that I can match C speed with D, even with range-checking enabled in the final binary!

                                    1. 6

                                      British ex-pat here. I understand what you’re saying regarding not feeling “you”, and can relate but with a different spin. :-)

                                      In my personal experience living in a country not of my birth for going on 13 years, I don’t really consider myself British anymore, but a global citizen; however this is not something I feel I’ve lost. If I’m in the UK, I miss my new home (where I’m now a citizen), and when I’m home, I miss the UK (well, some of it; there are good reasons I left… ;-)).

                                      The only way to reconcile this strange lack of belonging is considering myself a human of the universe. Countries are kinda weird concepts anyways. Hat-tip John Lennon etc.

                                      That all being said, I have fierce national pride for my new homeland, Canada. It’s the best place I’ve ever been, and I’m continually more proud to call it my home. Perhaps it’s this that has led me to not care so much about national pride in my country of origin? If I had to pick one and only one, I wouldn’t hesitate to pick Canada.

                                      [Work]

                                      I started a new job a couple of weeks ago, and I’m ramping up there. This week is a bit of a wind down until the solstice shutdown period, however, so things are light. It’s a good time to arrive on board.

                                      [Home]

                                      Over Christmas break I plan to cut a new release of kurly, which is coming along nicely.

                                      And yes, Advent of Code when time permits.

                                      1. 4

                                        I love Canada too! In particular Francophone culture and Montréal, where I am now. Where are you?

                                        It’s not national borders and politics so much that is important for me. Hell, if it were up to me, burn all flags (CW: ska). Rather, it’s the culture. The stories, the language, the beliefs, the music, the food – the things that make us feel Mexican. I know Mexico is a place with a lot of trouble, although I am privileged enough to have only left because of mild discomfort. I don’t want to wave a flag over all the problems in order to hide them.

                                        Anyways, warm season’s greetings to you, fellow world national!

                                        1. 4

                                          I live in a tiny town called Cobourg, in Ontario about two hours east of Toronto. Whilst I work full time remote, my company has an office in Montréal as it happens; next time I go there I’ll ping you for a pint. :-)

                                          I totally understand why you miss Mexico from a cultural perspective; that’s quite a gap.

                                    1. 7

                                      Personally I recommend the BBC micro:bit and all the various kits. These little things are superb!

                                      I run a chapter of Code Club at my local elementary school, and the kids love making all kinds of gadgets with one of these, coding in Python.

                                      http://microbit.org/

                                      1. 3

                                        One step back from micro:bit (and not really programming) are the littleBits sets. The synth one in particular is great for kids just mature enough not to break it. You snap together oscillators and filters in a straight line and alter the sound that comes out of the speaker at the end. I suppose we could call it railway programming ;)

                                      1. 23

                                        I vote we hold the line. Crypto is a perfectly cromulent synonym for cryptography.

                                        A review of https://lobste.rs/t/crypto doesn’t reveal any mistagged stories. Even the one about IOTA was about differential cryptography.

                                        1. 6

                                          Some of them got retagged because I went through and fixed the tags. Check the mod log.

                                          1. 1

                                            They’re synonmyms. Might be better to label the crypto tag with “other crypto” or something similar to emphasize cryptocurrencies get their own tag.

                                            I dont support redefining or retiring a common phrase, esp a big on in CompSci, becausr some people are using it wrong. SpiderOak couldve similarly justified their use of ZeroKnowledge for different concept by pointing out how many people they had using it wrong. We didnt let them, though.

                                            1. 7

                                              Tags serve the purpose of allowing people to categorize and filter the stories posted here on lobste.rs. The correctness or incorrectness of “crypto” aside—even the appilcability of cryptography to cryptocurrencies aside—the present confusion damages the value of the crypto and cryptocurrencies lobste.rs tags. Renaming the tag to cryptography would make the tag more meaningful.

                                              1. 5

                                                This is correct. We’re not talking about definitions of words, but usefulness of tags for filtering.

                                                1. 1

                                                  We are talking about the definitions of words. Cryptography equals crypto. Cryptocurrencies equals… well, you know. The two tags are there for the purposes of highlighting or filtering those. The OP says people are incorrectly labelling tags. Solution is to tell them what they’re doing so they can avoid it or some moderation activity.

                                                  You going to ask for admin to change the Windows or Programming tags if a handful of people put them on other activities we have a tag for? We going to get rid of them or make them longer if they’re mislabelled?

                                                  1. 2

                                                    We can lead horses to water but we cannot make them drink.

                                                    If the world at large is moving toward changing the English language to employ crypto as a shortname for cryptocurrencies, then with all the will in the world we cannot fight against that.

                                                    The definition of ‘hacker’ forcibly changing due to sheer weight of incorrect usage is a fine example from our past. Respectfully, your ideals are noble, but if they don’t reflect reality, that’s the end of it. :-)

                                                    1. 1

                                                      The definition of ‘hacker’ forcibly changing due to sheer weight of incorrect usage is a fine example from our past.

                                                      That right there is the most compelling counter since I’ve given up trying to explain the difference to the general public. Watching people’s faces when I say I read Hacker News is interesting to this day. Always have to follow up with an explanation about the term. So, I just skip the name usually to say what content it has.

                                                      “We can lead horses to water but we cannot make them drink.”

                                                      This is wrong analogy. There’s a whole sub-field of education with this name plus a super-set called Information Security both of which will be penalizing students for getting it wrong. There’s also tech forums that force correct use of labeling or other rules. On this one, I’d prefer to keep burden low on moderators. Gotta balance that against accuracy. Tag renames plus suggestions on corrective action would imply action against the account if that was ignored. There’s also possibility of scripting it to look for keywords on any items tagged crypto to autosuggest cryptocurrencies.

                                            1. 13

                                              This is a pretty weak guide, and I’d suggest (with no malice intended) that the author isn’t qualified to write this.

                                              Just as one example for starters, it’s possible to hide processes:

                                              https://sysdig.com/blog/hiding-linux-processes-for-fun-and-profit/

                                              1. 6

                                                The author admits that the guide is pretty weak at the start.

                                                This seems to be targeted at less experienced users and offers some basic advice. To someone who just has a WordPress site on a VPS this kind of guide is incredible useful.

                                                If you are dealing with a talented adversary who is hiding their processes this won’t help. But a pretty big portions of compromises are people who left their password as “root123” and got owned by a bot.

                                                1. 2

                                                  The other also conflates ~/.bash_history with /var/log/wtmp in the section about last(1).

                                                  1. 1

                                                    I’d like to see a good guide to monitoring UDP traffic.

                                                1. 3

                                                  “Studies have shown”, and I have verified that it works for me, that writing things down helps memory consolidation. I solve a problem (or don’t solve it) and then collect all the links, summarize the relevant things and write it up. I may also do extra research while doing this. I remember things better (or at least remember that I solved something) after this exercise. It also helps me to finish writing.

                                                  Now, I do this on a blog. I learn a lot from other folks coding blogs, so this is my way of giving back. But, it’s pretty public (A friend of mine told me “I couldn’t put myself out there like that”) and indeed when I get things wrong, it’s embarrassing, and some of my colleagues are not afraid to call me out in public on that, but the embarrassment is less than what you would think, and the upsides, for me, outweigh the self-consciousness factor.

                                                  If I had to start over, I might do it anonymously, but I would keep it all the same.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Off-topic for this article but relevant to your comment, I personally value your blog. Thank you for writing it!

                                                    This in particular was great - মৌলিক: A prime number toy

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Personally, I like the karma tallies. For my own use case, I use the numbers as a metric for how my behaviour is received in this community. When I make a contribution and the contribution sees a lot of negative karma, I take that away and think about whether the post was constructive or welcome to the community, or whether or not I happened to stumble on a hornets nest others weren’t ready to talk about. If I receive positive karma, I am likewise encouraged to equal or better that kind of input in future.

                                                    For me, the scores give me an opportunity to reflect on my actions, their impact on others, and whether or not I am even interested in being part of this community in the first place. These are things I subconsciously and consciously evaluate as I interact with lobste.rs, and are in my humble opinion a benefit on the whole.

                                                    Quiet contemplation of our actions is important, missing from our planet in too many contexts, and I believe necessary for successful participation in communities.

                                                    As for the popularity contest, I don’t see that. I don’t see anyone pandering to anyone here, so I cannot agree that there is such a thing. Even the moderators and site founder get treated with the same degree of respect and (importantly) critical thought that a newly registered user does.