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    HTML and CSS are incredibly powerful and concise if you actually accept that they’re different from JavaScript and take the time to learn them. It’s a shame so many people throw them away in order to feel like they’re doing “real programming”.

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      I guess they’re working on it, but I’m disappointed to see only 384 signatures, with very few managers (not counting program managers). C’mon, Googlers! C’mon, management! Stand up for people who aren’t waited on by chefs and surrounded by fountains of gold! You can work anywhere if need be!

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        Culori does not have a Color class. Instead, it uses plain objects to represent colors

        I like this already!

        The variety of distance metrics looks promising. Starred, will check out next time I do color comparing!

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          Thanks! I initially started out with a fluent API, but I felt it complicates the API unnecessarily and I wanted to make it easy to add additional color spaces, with a set of basic functions that work across the board.

          In regards to the distance metrics, I’ve tried to work from primary sources, and I think I got the formulas right, but for some of them I couldn’t find reliable test data. However, empirically they seem to work well: https://beta.observablehq.com/@danburzo/nearest-css-named-colors

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          I like substack and Mike Bostock a lot. Both are 1) very imaginative and 2) really good at making small, understandable parts work well together.

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            Today, I fixed a “bug” in a art bot/tool called Colorer that I’ve been working on with my friend Alex. I wrote some thoughts on “bugs” in art.

            The rest of the week, I gotta recap the D&D game I ran Saturday, schedule the next one, schedule family visits, write a Patreon update about the last month, and maybe start on National Novel Generation Month?

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              I, too, have held on to the iPhone SE for a long time because it’s the only reasonably-sized Apple phone. A couple of friends of mine just bought some for the same reason. I think the secondary market for them could be vicious if they never make a normal-sized phone again.

              I actually want to get away from Apple for other reasons. I think they’re horrible tax dodgers and monopolistic; and the way they treat smaller companies is shitty. But I do agree that is not as big an issue as the massive surveillance capitalism operation Google operates.

              I really wish the Firefox OS Phone had made it. It died off before I could even get my hands on one. Of all the things that are depressing these days, it’s small, but I am bummed that there are basically only two choices for phones that can run a decent web browser.

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                Really interesting read.

                This part was perplexing, though:

                The other side of being calm was a loss of motivation. The internet gets you to do things. You see the successes of other people and try to keep up with them. You value time much more dearly, as you know that any extra 10 minutes you can steal is a chanсe to read an interesting article from your archives that might produce a small change in you.

                To me, that kind of fear-based motivation is something I want to get away from and is part of why I’m taking a social media break. It’s a kind of behavioral conditioning that really rubs me the wrong way.

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                  why I’m taking a social media break

                  Just curious, do you not consider lobste.rs to be ‘social media’ ?

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                    For me, Lobsters feels like a place where people interested in computers and programming come to with a spirit of generosity. That’s just how I feel about it. So when I see an article here, I think of it like - this person is sharing their experiences, maybe I can learn about it from them.

                    Opposing this feeling is how I feel in Hacker News, with hyper-“rationalist”, argumentative people often focused on business and other icky things, not the technology itself. I don’t feel the same spirit there.

                    That’s why I like Lobsters.

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                      I don’t, though it does fit a broader definition of it. It is media, and if you click through to the comments, it is social.

                      I was thinking of a much narrower, modern definition of social media. I consider a social media platform to be one that optimizes for engagement by quantifying users and their contributions. Twitter and Facebook are exemplars, and Mastodon (perhaps unintentionally) does some of this (scoring toots, getting people to crave notifications, etc.) as a result of cloning Twitter.

                      I suppose lobste.rs does have karma, but honestly, I didn’t even notice it for years.

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                    That number is the total number of “upvotes” you have received on all comments and stories you posted on the site. Its the same number as your “karma” on your profile.

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                      Aha! Thank you. I had no idea those were counted.

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                        To clarify, it’s not the “total number of upvotes”, but rather (upvotes - downvotes), which gives you your net karma.

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                          It’s in your profile, too, along with an average.

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                        • I’m making some small adjustments to an image recoloring bot I’ve been building with a friend. (Mostly, just limiting size this week.)
                        • I’m starting to add a simple, year-based view to my projects viewer that uses GitHub as a data source.
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                          Is “JavaScript is a toy language” the new “writing scripts isn’t real programming”?

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                            Just because a language isn’t good at everything doesn’t mean it’s a toy language. If that were true, every language would be a toy and nobody would be doing “real programming”.

                            The comic just calls out the shoe-horning of javascript into environments that it’s not really well suited for. It’s not an attack on the language, but instead calling out humans that are doing silly things. Javascript is great for some things, and not so great for others.

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                              A better comparison would be “x86 is a toy”. We have these monstrous 64 bit machines that still boot up in 16 bit real mode with archaic instruction sets. Much like the cascading tech pile that is emscripten, asm, etc.

                              The criticisms here are more thorough, however. Callback hell seems like a valid weakness to point out.

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                                In that it’s infelictious, but largely true?

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                                  Yes, that’s precisely what this is. It’s all about back-end developers trying to feel superior to front-end. Of course, JS isn’t only front-end now, because of node.js and related infrastructure… This is fairly subjective, but to me, the subtext of javascript-on-the-server was always that self-proclaimed server developers are often unwilling to treat web developers as equals, which makes it difficult to do meaningful collaboration, and most interesting sites require both types of work. You can see how that would be frustrating.

                                  There really are not very many conceptual differences between the two, just language proficiency, so JS backends were fundamentally a move to ignore the people trying to be exclusionary and hope they went away.

                                  And no, it’s not always easy for everyone to change career direction to use another language, precisely because of this, um, “typecasting” and rhetoric about how JS supposedly attracts less competent programmers. And I don’t actually agree that JS was ever bad enough to justify wanting to leave, anyway. This was always purely about claiming prestige and trying to hang onto it by putting down everyone else.

                                  Given that history, it feels like making fun of the JS ecosystem is somewhat unsporting. It’s programmers who feel superior saying “well, you’re not inferior anymore but look at how silly it was of you to work so hard to get to that point!”

                                  Although JS is certainly doing well as a technology today, so I could see a case that it’s the new incumbent. But then I’d like to see criticism of what it could be doing differently today, not of how it got here. Much of what the comic derides are (source) distribution and toolchain issues, which are no worse in JS than in Ruby, PHP, Java, or C++. All contemporary languages have absolutely horrible stories for distribution. Actually, that’s a big problem. :)

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                                    I actually use JavaScript (well, CoffeeScript) voluntarily both on the server and client side because I think it’s the best available choice for my mix of components. I disagree with your assessment, and I think this picture is in fact a very good criticism of JavaScript and related tools. The problem is that people are thoughtlessly building a huge rickety tower of tools on a questionable foundation. This creates enormous complexity and churn, and makes it very hard to produce good software that doesn’t constantly require rewriting various parts as things break and become obsolete.

                                    I don’t know what the solution is, and the root of the problem probably lies deeper - in the web platform, its evolution, and everything around it, rather than just JavaScript. However, it’s definitely frustrating regardless of whether I look at the server or client side development, and I believe this sort of criticism is worthwhile because it might just inspire somebody to think “Hang on, there is a better way of doing things”.

                                    I agree with your last paragraph though; I can’t think of any language I’m familiar with which doesn’t have many issues of its own (C++, Ruby, C#, Python, Haskell - I can immediately think of problems with each), so it would be wrong to single out JavaScript as the only offender.

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                                      The problem is that people are thoughtlessly building a huge rickety tower of tools on a questionable foundation.

                                      A thousand times yes.

                                      I don’t mind Javascript-the-language too much, though there are some design choices which in retrospect look like mistakes. For years, and long before anybody used the phrase “full-stack developer,” I enjoyed chances to do front-end work and prided myself on my willingness and ability to see my work through end-to-end and handle both the client and the server components. I was always the guy defending Javascript to my fellow back-end developers.

                                      But Javascript’s limited standard library, lack of higher-level code organization facilities, and protean nature have always led to these all-encompassing frameworks where you have to buy into a whole cosmology, and at some point I just lost the patience to deal with the world of frameworks layered upon frameworks, where it takes half a dozen language-specific build tools and package managers to run even the simplest modern webapp, and where front-end build times (for an interpreted language!) exceed server-side build times. Maybe I’m just getting old, but I’m glad that these days I mostly get to leave the front-end to the front-end people (and it’s certainly not because I think that work is easier or of lesser value than the work that I do).

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                                      Given that history, it feels like making fun of the JS ecosystem is somewhat unsporting. It’s programmers who feel superior saying “well, you’re not inferior anymore but look at how silly it was of you to work so hard to get to that point!”

                                      I can’t speak for anyone else, but for my part in poking fun at the JS ecosystem, my complaint is along the lines of @jfb, in that the community has been considerably ahistoric. This is a complaint I sling at any place apporpriate, it just so happens that the JS community is the visible offender these days. The JS community has produced a huge amount of low-quality software completely ignorant of what has come before them and they are proud of it. I find it very frustrating to be in an industry where one of the biggest growth components is unintersted in self-improvement. That is a problem and one of the biggest contributors to my desire to become a farmer someday. It is by no means a new complaint but I don’t think it is getting any better.

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                                        It’s all about back-end developers trying to feel superior to front-end.

                                        So you chalk it up any criticism of javascript to people just needing to feel superior to someone else, and you think javascript is actually the one true language that should be used everywhere? That seems more than a bit reactionary and on the far other end of the spectrum.

                                        I think some languages are just bad (not a fan of php either, fwiw). It is unfortunate that javascript is the only language available for browsers, and web developers have little to no choice of which language to use. There is no possibility of natural selection to weed out really terrible languages. So you end up with people creating X-to-JS compilers to escape javascript, and the web just ends up with more layers of complexity. With people trying to push the web into apps (mobile and desktop), I think this will only get worse. The Birth and Death of JavaScript is terrifyingly insightful.

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                                          I don’t believe I said either of those things, nor do I believe them. I admit I’m a bit bewildered by such an emotional response; I try pretty hard to take personal attacks out of things like this when I write them, and I don’t think I did a worse than usual job this time. I realize it’s a sensitive subject.

                                          I am absolutely a fan of any effort to explore more languages than we currently are, and to explore using languages for things they haven’t traditionally been used for. Compilers which target JavaScript are such an exploration. Escaping JS is not a wrong description of the goal, but understand that the cost of adding a new language to all browsers, and dealing with security and API-design and feature support for it, is immense. That has far more to do with the nature of the web, and JS’s good fortune to have gotten that position, which with current technology can really only be occupied by one language (or virtual machine) at a time. It has nothing to do with compiler authors disliking JS. If I prefer to study Buddhist writings in the original Pali, does that mean I dislike English?

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                                            I don’t believe I said either of those things, nor do I believe them. I admit I’m a bit bewildered by such an emotional response; I try pretty hard to take personal attacks out of things like this when I write them, and I don’t think I did a worse than usual job this time. I realize it’s a sensitive subject.

                                            eh? I just read what you wrote, which seemed fairly accusatory to me. Picking out a few things:

                                            It’s all about back-end developers trying to feel superior to front-end…

                                            self-proclaimed server developers are often unwilling to treat web developers as equals, which makes it difficult to do meaningful collaboration…

                                            This was always purely about claiming prestige and trying to hang onto it by putting down everyone else.

                                            It’s programmers who feel superior saying “well, you’re not inferior anymore but look at how silly it was of you to work so hard to get to that point!”

                                            I don’t think what I wrote was “such an emotional response” by any means, it was certainly written more as bewildered bogglement than “such an emotion response”. The web clearly needs a <boggle> tag (would fit right in with <blink>).

                                            If I prefer to study Buddhist writings in the original Pali, does that mean I dislike English?

                                            Not sure what point you are trying to make here.

                                            In summary: I wasn’t intending to come across as “emotional”.

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                                              Well, we seem to be talking past each other intent-wise; I was similarly confused by your response, and perhaps emotion wasn’t the reason.

                                              So you chalk it up any criticism of javascript to people just needing to feel superior to someone else,

                                              No, but this one.

                                              and you think javascript is actually the one true language that should be used everywhere?

                                              I’m at a loss for what I said that sounded anything like this.

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                                        It’s been around. It kind of reminds me of immigration in the US. At one point, Italian Americans were considered weird and foreign. Now, Latinos draw the fire, but in 2035, they’ll be entrenched, must like YavaScript.

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                                          No, because some of the people who said “writing scripts isn’t real programming” did actually program, a little.

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                                          Some parts were wrong (I guess he forgot about NPM), but it was still incredibly funny.

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                                            NASA publishes APIs!

                                            The last time I looked at their stuff, circa 1998, they pretty much only published text-based data files, along with descriptions of the COBOL-derived formats. This is exciting; I’ll have to take a look. :)

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                                              There’s a few that just look like an inscrutable Javadoc dump (which may have interesting data nonetheless) but also some very friendly ones! I really want to clear time to do anything with these.

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                                                here is an example of querying for the star labeled as Sun.

                                                That is cool!

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                                              (Hey, I’m new to lobste.rs. Finding it a pleasant read so far!)

                                              Mostly working on cleaning up/re-styling a project I iced about a year ago, Sprigot so I can add the ability to shared nodes between documents. Which is a form of procrastinating on working on my resume.

                                              Also, picking at various Twitter bots, released and unreleased.