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    Long… but very interesting interview.

    The order of contents and technical topics from start to end was very well defined and the flow of the conversation was very smooth. Well done.

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      I would say it mostly depends on your interests, but since I also used posts like this one to find an initial set of people/organizations to follow, here’s my current list: https://s.ovalerio.net/users/dethos/following

      I haven’t reviewed the list for a while (something that I should do soon, since some are inactive or don’t make sense anymore), but it has a set of accounts where I found interesting content at some point in time.

      My account: @dethos@s.ovalerio.net

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        I usually use what I have “at hand”: Old laptops (mine or from people that would otherwise throw them to the garbage), Raspberry Pis and occasionally a cheap VPS.

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          If the content fits one of the existing categories and you are sharing your knowledge or opinion about a given technical topic, I would say you not only could but also should keep submitting your content (as everyone else in this community).

          I saw many comments mentioning “high quality” vs “low quality”, that shouldn’t matter. It is the voting system’s job to bring up the good content and hide the weaker articles.

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            Newsblur. I moved to it about 6 months or so prior to the Google Reader shutdown, as I could see the writing on the wall at that point. It’s been rock solid and worth far more than the paltry annual fee I pay for it. Like pinboard, It’s indie web software at it’s best.

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              Newsblur is a wonderful “reader”. It has a lot of other useful features, like being able to handle newsletters, so you can subscribe and read your them just like you would do for any other RSS feed.

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              First I’ve heard of WebMentions, what an incredibly odd RFC. What’s the need here and how does WebMentions fulfill it?

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                I think it is a neat idea.

                It allows me to know when someone mentions one of my blog posts, so I can check what they have to say about it. If I ever need to, I can write a response to an article on my blog and let the original author automatically know about it, without needing to use their comment system (if they even have one).

                As a reader, if well implemented, it allows me to follow the discussion about a given article across the web (something I would have a hard time to do without it).

                I would define the need as: having a way to discuss and share ideas without the usual limitations of a traditional comment system.

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                  Well explained!

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                  Maybe this helps to understand it: https://indieweb.org/Webmention

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                    I mean, I get what it is, I just don’t get why it is or what it solves. In principle, it is a way to notify someone (if you choose) that you have linked to their site (if they support it). So is the need here to know when your site was linked to? This doesn’t really provide a complete view of that and seems to rely heavily on scraping services to tell you that someone linked to you anyway. Why even have the spec at that point? That’s what I mean by I don’t get the problem that this solves.

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                      The “Indieweb” reason for webmention is to host your own comments/replies. If your comments on an article live on the server of the article, they can be removed. Hosting it yourself means more control over your content. If a service were to be taken down permanently, take medium.com for example, the comments from all the indieweb folks would remain online in some form.

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                        I lack the resources to scrape every new site that appears (or indeed the ones that already exist).

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                          But this doesn’t do that for you. It just gives someone the option to notify you if they want to.

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                            It tells me where I might want to scrape. You’ll never get everything, but you don’t have to.

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                          It enables communication in a decentralized web. Webmentions are like “reply”, “like” or “mention” notifications on Twitter. On the one hand it can be used as notifications, but it can also be used to automatically parse the source and display some context on the target, like comments.

                          For example, see the “Interactions” at the bottom of this page: https://jlelse.blog/dev/aoc-2020-day1-2

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                            Right, that’s still the what rather than the why. Assuming the why is “I want to have replies, likes, and mentions on my site for no specific purpose.” This spec feels like a poor way to accomplish that. There’s no verification of authenticity. You just get a GET request from something and post it on your site? Or don’t and just say you did? Or spam someone’s poor implementation for some free link backs?

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                              The spec (https://www.w3.org/TR/webmention/) includes verification (point 3.2.1 and 3.2.2). And it’s up to you how to process and display mentions or whether to display them at all. I don’t use any scraper service or social media like Twitter. It’s nice to see when people mention my posts though. And the spec is quite simple. It’s usually the first build block people implement when they get into the IndieWeb.

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                                I’m thinking about adding webmention support to my blog, and the reason is that I think it’d be fun see if and when someone references my posts and what they’re saying about them. Possibly I could reply to them if I think it’s warranted.

                                In my case I’d probably implement it as an email sent to me on each mention, and not automatically add links to the posts referenced (both to avoid spam, and my blog is static and javascript free, so it’d be complicated to do).

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                                  Sounds like a good idea :)

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                      thanks for the tips. I run an instance for a single user and I also plan to do same to free some resources on my machine (700 Mb is still a lot). Mastodon is indeed an heavy beast (for my use case at least).

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                          the next time I have to buy a UPS for a piece of equipment that requires power 24/7, I will buy a line-interactive UPS rather than a standby UPS

                          I’ve been wondering why one would get an office, standby UPS for a server (home or otherwise), but then I realized someone who has never been designing server installations indeed has no way to even know what keywords to look for.

                          And now that fewer and fewer companies even have on-premises server rooms, it may be becoming a somewhat obscure knowledge even among professional sysadmins.

                          Maybe it’s time for a collaborative “how to make a server closet” manual…

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                            I would certainly welcome a guide like that.

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                              I second this. It would be extremely valuable to some of us who are less familiar with this.

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                              That would be a lovely piece for all of us with nascent home datacenters. :-)

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                                I’ve just started playing around with some home server gear, and the best general resource I’ve found is the r/homelab wiki. The Hardware Guide was particularly useful to orient myself to the world of decade-old enterprise servers, but it’s UPS subsection doesn’t mention this “line-active” terminology.

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                                  “how to make a server closet” manual

                                  Time to dig through the photos I still have for “how not to make a network/server closet!”

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                                    Maybe it’s time for a collaborative “how to make a server closet” manual…

                                    That would be awesome.

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                                      how to make a server closet

                                      please

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                                      I am genuinely surprised that PyPI allows package deletion. I thought after left-pad, everyone just kinda said “yeah, we shouldn’t allow that anymore” and disabled package deletion. npm certainly did. Rust/Cargo’s crates.io has similar policies. This is an accident waiting to happen.

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                                        I also assumed it wasn’t possible, but after one package I was using disappeared, I had to go verify and in fact the option to delete the package is there. A big red alert is shown mentioning that other people will be able use that package name after deletion, but the owner can proceed with the deletion if he really wants to.

                                        This is an accident waiting to happen.

                                        I share the same opinion.

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                                        Interesting, it confirms my long time suspicion. It would be interesting to see a bigger study with a more representative sample on this topic. Like other comments mention, there is also the possibility of plausible being blocked, so these values can be even bigger.

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                                          This seems a nice idea. I will try to do something similar this weekend.

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                                            I use RSS for several purposes and not always with the same reader, but the two main tools are:

                                            • Newsblur for blogs and other reading materials
                                            • Thunderbird for feeds that I use as a kind of notification system
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                                              This is why I recommend everyone to use https://git.sr.ht/~sircmpwn/openring . It basically fetches posts from blogs you follow and integrates them into your blog.

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                                                Very nice idea indeed.

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                                                  Thanks for sharing!

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                                                  Sounds interesting, specially for those running their own “one user” mastodon instance. Lots of complexity and resources wasted when something much lighter and simpler would do the trick.

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                                                    I’m currently exploring Qownnotes with its Nextcloud integration and until this moment I’ve been pleasantly surprised with the result.

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                                                      https://blog.ovalerio.net - I usually only post once or twice a month, mostly about technology, web development and security.

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                                                        Take care of some ansible playbooks in order to manage the configuration of a new server.

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                                                          Write a blog post, finish a book and use the remaining time (if there is any left) continue learning rust.

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                                                            Writing more Rust

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                                                              No Rust for me this weekend but only because I’ve been working with it all week. The ray tracer is coming along nicely.

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                                                                Oh wow, you just reminded me that I should work on my raytracer again.

                                                                I bought a big book on raytracing a few years ago, had a brief skim through it, implemented the very most basic ideas and promptly put it into my bookshelf and totally forgot about it. It was (I think?) not long after I had completed a graphics course at university where we’d covered and implemented basic raytracing and I wanted to dive deep right into it, but I probably wasn’t quite ready.

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                                                                  I’ve been going through this book and have found it very accessible even without a background in matrix math.

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                                                                    https://www.pbrt.org/ this is the book I was thinking of! Found it at last, hidden away in a stack of books.

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                                                                      Nice! Thanks.

                                                                      The third edition is online for free now, too: http://www.pbr-book.org/.

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                                                                This weekend I will do the same