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    Metaprogramming Ruby 2: Program Like the Ruby Pros is an absolute must-read if you’re working with Ruby more. It covers the object model in a really approachable and practical way.

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      Does anyone here use Bitwarden? I didn’t know about it, but it looks really attractive.

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        Yes, it’s awesome. It’s also the only password manager that has a Firefox for Android extension (to my knowledge).

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          Yes. It has some rough edges – I wish syncing was better – but it’s working great.

          My syncing issue has to do with the fact that everything has its own copy the data: desktop app, mobile app, browser plugins, etc. When you make a change they do not sync between them all immediately. You can have a Bitwarden app or plugin that is days behind so you have to go to settings and do a manual sync. Very annoying, but not a deal breaker.

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            I use the venerable pass. It has none of this mobile mumbojumbo or autosync frills the kids today are talking about.

            It’s so simple and lean, I never thought pass git pull would be annoying.

            I would appreciate a mobile UI sometimes, though. A Sailfish client. But that’s not a dealbreaker either.

            Maybe I could hook the missus up with Rubywarden, though. Pass would be too much for her.

            Addendum: There appears to be a QML frontend on OpenRepos. Found through storeman. Not a complete client but have to give it a spin :)

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              There is definitely a pass app for android. I’m not sure about iOS.

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                As someone who uses a mobile and two desktops, having passwords being synced across devices is a must-have. It’s just too much of a pain to remember to copy new passwords from my phone to machine A, then B, and vice-versa.

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                  Home desktop, work desktop, work laptop, work macOS laptop and hopefully soon two Sailfish mobiles running pass.

                  Made git pull a habit, not a chore, but ymmv.

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              yeah, it’s open source and possible to run self-hosted as well.

              check out the discussion from a topic from a few days ago, id just be copying from there:

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              I personally use Bitwarden, which I would say that fulfills all 3 points that you want, but I never tinkered with the SSH sync (although its privacy section ensures that its part of how it syncs). If you want a simpler and lower level alternative, probably pushcx’s advice of checking out pass works best for you.

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                Strong +1. Been using Bitwarden for 1.5 years now and it’s everything I hoped it would be.

                • It’s open source, which is a must-have for a password manager for me.
                • I used it on ~every platform (Linux, Mac, Windows, Android, iOS) and it’s more than functional–a pleasure to use on most. More than I can say for any other password manager.
                • It’s a tiny team (of ~1?) but it’s very active and has solid contributions from random people. Responses to issues are prompt and effective.
                • There are several independent backend implementations (in Rust, Go, Ruby that I’ve seen, probably more now).
                • I’ve read through big chunks of the code and it seems solid–something I could contribute back to. My only complaint was that the sync API was designed to do separate requests per entry, so some metadata about the number of entries does leak unnecessarily. I haven’t checked if that was fixed, but it’s fairly minor.

                Overall the experience has only improved. I’m sure it has a bright future.

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                  Thanks for introducing me to this, it’s about what I am looking for. Time to ditch manually synced (& merged, of inevitable forks) KeePass.

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                    Can also recommend Bitwarden, I have not tried the desktop application, but the mobile version on Android and browser extensions have worked without any issues for me so far across different browsers and operating systems.

                    Edit: Apparently, I posted the same comment twice, my mistake.

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                      Is this one open source?

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                          It is indeed, but there’s a caveat with self-hosting it that irks me. Though apparently there are ways to work around it, as mentioned.

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                            Well, that’s cool! Thanks! :)

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                            a few people incl. me have been able to code a client-compatible self-hosted version as well, gives you a lot of insight and trust in it

                            https://github.com/vvondra/bitwarden-serverless https://github.com/jcs/bitwarden-ruby

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                              Nice! :)

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                          I run a SYS Dedicated Server with Proxmox as a VM Host. I recommend PM if you wanna get into virtualized hosting, it’s rather neat.

                          • Shaarli (Bookmarks)
                          • Rainloop (IMAP/SMTP Client, though I’m switching it off)
                          • Nextcloud
                          • Airsonic (Music Streaming)
                          • Cachet (Status Page, on shared hosting)
                          • Invoice Ninja (forsSide-business stuff)
                          • TinyTinyRSS (though looking for replacements, Feedly hasn’t been very pleasant, I have about 600 feeds on there)
                          • Postal (Internal Mail Infrastruture)
                          • YouRLS (URL Shortener, even got a neat Domain for it)
                          • Gitea (for my private projects or before I publish it to github)
                          • Skeletor (Selfwritten Analytics tool, currently not used)
                          • PFSense (VPN, DNS and Firewall)
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                            try selfoss for a RSS aggregator/reader. IMO the best user experience among self-hsoted tools in this regard

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                              Thanks, I’ll try and see if it can handle my workloads <3

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                              I was using Proxmox before but I found it easier and more efficient to use docker as there isn’t reserved memory for each container like you have with a VM.

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                                Hm, yeah, but I have lots of Containers in Proxmox too (LXC) which also works better for IPv6 connectivity. I need the VM mostly for PFSense, which is BSD and doesn’t run too well in a container (it doesn’t run at all).

                                PM also has a lot more functions that I like than Docker, especially towards failover with data persistence.

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                                RSS reader written in Python (and not PHP): newspipe. I haven’t test it out yet but it looks solid.

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                                  I’ve experimented a bit. While it looks rather nice, the category functionality is probably not quite sufficient. I rely heavily on a hierarchy of categories to sort out my feeds…

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                                Unfortunately Czech Vodafone is playing with the idea and promoting it already: https://www.vodafone.cz/osobni/volani/vodafone-pass/#section-compare