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    Its interesting that a dollar amount wasn’t ascribed to their time. My rough estimate is that it costs them $5600 in time per month (28 hours a week * $50 (which is 100k a year) * 4 weeks/month).

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      In general, these comparisons give me some pause. It’s essentially a variation on the marxist labor theory of value. Yes, your time is worth something (to you, and maybe to others!). But this method presumes the existence of employers who will pay high contracting rates for any leftover hours you might have - all of them are billable.

      When I contrast that with stories I hear from actual contractors (arguments about billable hours; clients assuming you’re on-call 24/7, spending hours on the phone to get invoices paid, or spending a month without work because a project was cancelled at the last moment) it’s clear to me that hourly rates don’t really mean that much.

      Don’t get me wrong. I think this kind of exercise is very useful when deciding what to do with hours that are billable, when it comes to build-vs-buy decisions for example. And it’s useful to think about the most valuable use of your time in general.

    1. 1

      Hugo with my own theme - https://themes.gohugo.io/black-and-light/ https://www.davidhampgonsalves.com/

      Would like to host it on an ESP32 and run it on solar power, maybe I will at some point.

      1. 3

        This looks promising as what I really want is the diff/blame versioning of git, but for data. Lots of people build versioned databases, but they are easy to bypass and change the underlying data by skipping the app layer and going straight to the db.

        I’d like to have a database that I can tell if even the admin has changed data and what they changed without having to invoke blockchains.

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          Datomic will let you do this (and doesn’t use block chains).

          1. 3

            This is exactly right. Blockchain is a major headache and terrible for efficiency / performance if what you really want is just an audit. The genius of git is that anybody can clone your repo and become an independent source of truth, including all past history. As long as multiple people have clones, it’s basically impossible to commit fraud without getting caught.

          1. 1

            https://www.davidhampgonsalves.com/

            hugo based and I created the minimal theme for it which some others have started using.

            1. 2

              Lora, Tig welding, Scuba diving, more Rust and more hobby robotics.

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                I thought this headline was a joke until I clicked on the source article. Why on earth do people think DRM is a sane idea?

                I’d love to see a technical post-mortem on this, that would be fantastic.

                1. 2

                  I’m a bit lost; isn’t this the technical post-mortem?

                  1. 1

                    Why on earth do people think DRM is a sane idea?

                    Because it works. This kind of DRM exposes what DRM was all about from the beginning. It’s about controlling paying customers to keep them locked in to your system. If you buy a game on steam you are locked in to sticking with steam, if you buy a coffee pod machine you are locked in to buying coffee from the company that made the machine.

                    DRM was never meant to be technically impossible to break. Sure, OP has cracked it but 99.99% of the companies customers will not know how to do this and will continue to pay for refills.

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                      Agreed, I think its a very profitable business model, even in my case I bought at least 6 soap cartridges before I decided to reverse it.

                  1. 3

                    Nice work OP. I have always wanted to try some hardware hacking on the stuff I have but it’s super hard. On another note, this is a really sad trend that every product in every industry is picking up. Why just sell a product when you can sell a product that also locks you in to a subscription.

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                      I agree, I was really disappointed in the company when it became apparent that a helpful feature (notifying when cartridge was empty) was really DRM. Otherwise its a pretty cool device.

                      1. 1

                        I really wish companies would create a better quality robot cat litter box/printer/coffee maker, charge more for it and stop trying to make money off supplies, leaving that to third parties. Some bean counter came up with it and now they are drowning with every mom and pop in China having a clever (albeit messy) workaround to how to refill your inkjet cartridge and dodge the DRM chip.

                        1. 3

                          The initial price seems to put people off. It’s the same story for mobile games. No one wants to pay $1 for the app up front but they are ok paying microtransactions and lootboxes.

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                      What kind of soap have you been refilling the cartridge with?

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                        I’m just getting started experimenting but so far a bit of method dish soap mixed with some vinegar. I have also stopped using the plastic pellets and replaced them with safflower seeds that have been baked to sterilise them.

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                        Reverse engineering and suppressing my cat litter box’s DRM to allow me to refill the soap cartridge.

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                          This is simultaneously a cool hack and the most depressing sentence I’ve read in weeks.

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                            Agreed, when I first bought it I thought that it was just tracking uses to be helpfully but it basically becomes a brick after a set number of washes with each official cartridge.

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                          The war is real, but it’s not new. Most of these cross-platform plays emerged in 2011 (that’s 7 years ago, if you’re keeping score). Spoiler: Google still retains control of Android.

                          1. 1

                            While some came out 7 years ago, they weren’t ready (and still probably aren’t even now). Flutter is Beta and React Native still has some sharp edges. I think the authors points still stand.

                          1. 1

                            Not sure why but after this post I’m pleasantly surprised but the number of Canadian Lobsters.

                            1. 1

                              Me too but maybe different reason. I still love after all these years how Internet brings us all together from many places. If I knew about all the Canadians, might have tried to get together in chat or on a game to see what we might learn of each other’s culture and such. I always do that when I meet people in online games from other countries.

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                              I used a raspberry for this until I took a hard look at what I was storing. Became more digitally minimalistic and have been happy using a private gitlab repo with git-secret for encryption.

                              1. 1

                                So much quality work from jvns lately.

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                                  I find this to be a very poor argument. In this over simplified case we will have an answer (“Toronto”). If it was a human who made the mistake we wouldn’t even have that. Also we can then make improvements to the AI to prevent “Toronto” to prevent another occurrence.

                                  Overall AI doesn’t have to do a task perfectly to be preferable. It only has to be better then the average human.

                                  1. 1

                                    It only has to be better then the average human.

                                    No. If a human screws up and kills someone, they are likely to go to jail. If a robotic car kills someone, the car won’t go to jail, the people who made billions from the cars construction will not go to jail, the engineers who wrote the awful software will not go to jail, and the person who was irresponsible enough to use a self driving car will not go to jail. It had better be perfect.

                                  1. 2

                                    From my experience, creating recursive data structures is quite difficult and requires a good handle of the borrow checker. I had a similar experience with early success and sudden halt when I reached this point. Its also difficult to know after you have something working if it would be considered idiomatic. I don’t see this as a fault of the Rust language or community.

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                                      Great is probably a strong word for a language that doesn’t support parallelism (unless you are on on alternative runtime). Maybe guilds will fix this but they wont be ready in the near future.

                                      -I do enjoy and write quite a bit of ruby

                                      1. 3

                                        I agree. Ruby has missed the train with its close to no concurrency support. Also, its hyper dynamic and flexible nature, which seems like a productivity boost in the beginning, often end up being a maintenance nightmare, especially since software is getting more and more complex every day.

                                        I also write a lot of Ruby for a living, but I am not blind.

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                                        So I’ve been encouraging people to switch to thinkpads.. but since they’ve gone off trying to replicate the Macbook, what hardware do people recommend?

                                        The T460 I think is probably going to be my last thinkpad if they stay going this “no FRU” path.

                                        1. 5

                                          People have been recommending Dell XPS to me. I held one for a moment, it felt decent.

                                          1. 5

                                            The issue for me with the XPS is that they don’t offer a non-touchscreen version with 16gb Ram (stuck at 8gb).

                                            1. 4

                                              The XPS 13 is an excellent piece of hardware, better than any available MacBook.

                                              1. 4

                                                Provided you’re comparing to the 13" macbooks.

                                                The current selection in 10-11" laptops is disgraceful. I can’t find anything that has enough RAM and won’t tip backwards, other than the macbook air and macbook 2015.

                                                1. 1

                                                  Does it support 16GB of RAM?

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Yup! And there’s a version that comes from the factory running Ubuntu because it’s part of Dell’s Project Sputnik.

                                                2. 2

                                                  It’s pretty nice, barring some really annoying design decisions:

                                                  • power button glows really brightly
                                                  • the laptop-connecting end of the power cord has a blinding white LED all around it
                                                  • there’s a huge light on the side of the laptop (facing you) that glows with the light of a thousand suns whenever it’s charging
                                                3. 4

                                                  I’ve been really happy with my Surface Book. Wonderful screen, touch is one of those little things that you don’t use much but it makes them better when you do (likewise the pen for signing PDF forms), keyboard feels great to me (but I like a light touch and short travel, others may disagree), first-party dock is immensely practical, battery life is plenty, other specs are good enough.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    Do you run Linux on the Surface Book? Did you try to run OpenBSD?

                                                    1. 2

                                                      No. Was planning to try FreeBSD on it but then I found WSL worked really well for what I needed and I couldn’t be bothered. There’s a community on reddit (SurfaceLinux) and I’ve heard some positive things, but don’t know the details.

                                                  2. 4

                                                    I personally don’t think there has been a great ThinkPad since the T61 (2007). I used mine until late 2013 when I got a MacBook.

                                                    I wish they kept the legacy going, those were some truly beautiful laptops.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      HP Spectre 13 came out as my vote of choice recently. Very happy with it. Best keyboard I’ve had in years, and it’s blooming quick too.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        I don’t think the problem is the hardware. There is lots of great PC hardware out there. Maybe not comparable on build quality, trackpad, and battery, but hardware that has other things going for it.

                                                        The problem is that there is no desktop OS that compares to macOS. This is especially true for laptops.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          I use mac os for work and windows 10 at home. I really don’t see any real difference beyond user preference.

                                                          1. 3

                                                            What about user experience, intuitive interface and general better design?

                                                            I don’t use windows but I help a fair lot with their windows machines, and nothing feels smooth, intuitive. The only thing I like is the combined menubar+dock. I loathe the macOS dock.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I don’t think anything about windows is unintuitive. Windows acts largely like it has forever (aside from the Windows 8 start menu/metro thing). There’s nothing difficult about it. The macOS dock is bad, and I also think the launchpad is terrible. Finder is slower on my 2015 mbp (512gb/16gb/i7) than Cortana/search is on my Windows 10 desktop (512gb/8gb/i5). Not very much, but it’s noticeable. Both of them are SSDs.

                                                              General better design is completely subjective. I happen to prefer Windows 10 looks to macos. Different strokes!

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Building a replacement for MDP (terminal presentation tool) in rust. I have code blocks with syntax highlighting and most of the element types sorted, now working on parsing and auto margins.

                                                        Trying to decide if Tables, Footnotes, etc should be in first release, open to opinions.

                                                        1. 5

                                                          Article about avoiding page shift that shifts horribly, from a web design magazine with a terrible design. What happened to Smashing Magazine, I remember it being pretty good.

                                                          1. 4

                                                            Ha ha, yeah. It did that for me about 5 seconds after load, right about the time I stopped watching for shit to randomly jump around and got to reading.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            I wrote this as a side project to connect webhook(and straight http endpoints) together via configuration. It runs on Lambda(using the Serverless framework) so most usages are free. The JSON transformations / filters are JMESPath based which makes them quite powerful.