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    How timely. I just updated my site with web auth. I’m trying to get my site into shape with the coolest new gizmos and gadgets of the IndieWeb. :P https://indiewebify.me

    Have others done this? I can think of almost no sites that support this auth, but if there’s going to be a tree one day I figure I’ll keep trying seeds as they come up.

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      WebAuthn is a different.. level? of authentication — it’s basically the continuation of the U2F FIDO thing. It’s about talking to public key based authenticator devices like yubikeys and TPMs.

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      I’ll be in the CAD and Open Hardware devroom Sunday morning and then speaking and listening in Free Software Radio room all afternoon.

      It can definitely get very busy and its important to remember that all talks are recorded. I’ve found it’s much more interesting to arrange meetups around the talks.

      If anyone attending is interested in radio and will be in Brussels Thursday or Friday before FOSDEM, here’s an event to check out. https://wiki.gnuradio.org/index.php/Hackfest1902

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        I will arrive on Friday, but I will try to change for Thursday just because of this event

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        460 unread emails, taxes, and the paperwork to start an Amateur Radio club at Cardiff University.

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          Nice. Do you have the manpower to give license exams?

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            I think so, but still figuring out exactly the order of operations needed. Getting a club call sign, becoming RSGB affiliated, and becoming a University society all have very different requirements. But all three are in motion now. The local clubs and RSGB regional representative are all very supportive.

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              Awesome. Bit of a late reply, but I think a big part of getting people initially interested in ham radio is advertising it like a license to hack on RF stuff. And showing them Contact (1997), which has the best treatment of amateur radio in any movie. :-)

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            9 unread left, some of the other two done. I think I need to change some behaviors and situations to not have so many weekends spent on life administration. I’d be surprised if this isn’t a fairly common thought.

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            I think Read the Docs is a great resource and many of the best documentation sets I’ve seen have been hosted there. https://readthedocs.org/

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              I second Read the Docs, which I used for Fire★. You setup a yaml config and docs folder. Everything is in markdown and super easy to use. I love that you can mark code segments which I use in the API docs.

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              Cool to see them using GNU Radio for the analysis.

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                I use Gollum, the same wiki as GitHub. I chose it because it is git backed and uses Markdown formatting. https://github.com/gollum/gollum/blob/master/README.md

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                  A git repo with markdown logs for each day. I render them using Jekyll and this template: https://github.com/MovingBlocks/DevlogTemplate

                  jrnl looks interesting and has Markdown export… I’ll be looking into seeing if it can compliment my current setup.

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                    Hmm… Curta calculators in decent condition are going for about $1300 on eBay.

                    If somebody were to start a crowd-funding campaign to make a (assemble-it-yourself kit?) replica, I’d surely back that. Until then I’ll have to be satisfied with my slide rules and abacii.

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                        You can find them much cheaper than that at flea markets.

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                        No Bullshit Guide to Linear Algebra, because I’ve realised not knowing linear algebra is the thing holding me back the most for my personal goals lately.

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                          I liked Axler’s “Linear Algebra Done Right”. I am still undergrad student, but felt like I could learn more, so I found this book really appealing. But it could be too academic and kinda “dry” if you have finished with college long ago.

                          1. 3

                            I never took the class in school, and dropped out of college; text books are pretty hit-or-miss for me. I’ve tried a lot of resources to learn, though. My first intro was a crash course in an ML class on Coursera, and I’ve tried Shilov’s Linear Algebra, a linear algebra refresher course on Udacity (learn it by programming), and the Khan Academy videos, and a few other books. This book clicks, and also has a math refresher so you can relearn high school math first (which was over a decade ago for me). The thing that really sold it for me was it has lots of example problems and all the answers. I’ve taken the approach of working all problems and going back when I get one wrong to figure out where it went wrong, essentially using the answers as a unit test for my thinking.

                            1. 2

                              I have Linear Algebra Done Right on my bookshelf. It is quite good, a bit dry, and I wish I’d had it as the core of a class in university. The No Bullshit Guide to Linear Algebra looks like it might be a good reference with a bit more spice and entertainment to it.

                            2. 4

                              No Bullshit Guide to Linear Algebra

                              Is it good? Linear Algebra came up in a job interview recently and it stumped me; it’s amazing how much you can forget if you don’t keep using it.

                              1. 2

                                See my response in the other thread for why I like it. The writing style can be a bit off-putting at times, though; I just work through that because the rest of it really makes sense to me.

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                                  Another thing I forgot to mention, you can get laminated cheat sheets that summarize things. I picked up one when I grabbed a probstats cheat sheet, looks like it’ll be helpful later on.

                                2. 3

                                  Hi kyle, thx for the plug! Be sure to check out the jupyter notebooks that come with the book: https://github.com/minireference/noBSLAnotebooks The chapter numbers are a bit off (you need to s/n/n-1/g), but you can take a look to see examples of the SymPy commands—it’s an awesome tool for learning if you feel comfortable with code.

                                  For everyone else interested in the book, check out the preview here: https://minireference.com/static/excerpts/noBSguide2LA_preview.pdf or if you don’t have that much time, there is also a four-pager you can print an read on your next coffee break: https://minireference.com/static/tutorials/linear_algebra_in_4_pages.pdf

                                  Linear algebra is very powerful stuff!

                                1. 2

                                  New York: 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson. I’ve just finished Green Earth which is his compressed Science in the Capital trilogy and thoroughly enjoyed it. He shares William Gibson’s talent in finding interesting ideas and mashing them together into surprising and thoughtful plotlines. 2140 is combining (so far) high frequency trading, cooperative housing, and climate change.

                                  Haskell the craft of functional programming by Simon Thompson. Functional programming is a paradigm I have only used partially in C++. I want to understand it idiomatically and Haskell seems like the best learning language for that.

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                                    My home office. I work on software defined radios, covering the “full stack” of electronics/RF, firmware, HDL, drivers, and digital signal processing so the equipment on hand has grown over time. The back of my office has wire shelves with other misc tools. Desks, lamps, etc are all from Ikea.

                                    The two large monitors are attached to the Linux desktop who’s notable property is having four 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports to work with the higher bandwidth radios. The small monitor is shared between a NUC running Windows (Skype, Outlook, misc equipment software) and the PXIe chassis which also runs Windows. I share the mouse and keyboard between the three machines using Synergy.

                                    Audio is Wharfedale Diamond speakers driven by a Sonos and AKG K701s fed by an ODAC + OAMP combo.

                                    https://goo.gl/photos/81jNonnzwdu8mKNq9

                                    1. 1

                                      This has been a very approachable explanation both of the theory of phaselock loops, the different implementations, and also a good section on debugging them.

                                      I have a personal aspiration to work at one of the Antarctic research bases so I have a collection of books written by past employees there. I’ve come back around to this one which I haven’t read in a few years. It’s really interesting hearing about both the operation of the research program and the social effects of living in such a constrained environment.

                                      I go away for the weekend most weeks and listen to audiobooks during the two and a half hour drive each way. This last weekend I was listening to This Sceptred Isle, a history of Great Britain from 55 BCE to 1900 CE. I’m moving to Wales this fall and find that knowing some of the national background helps with feeling settled in an new area.

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                                        No idea about Ruby specifically, but for C/C++ and other languages there is cmake. It can generate projects for Visual Studio, KDevelop, Xcode and make (And others).

                                        What I’d really like is for Windows, Mac and Linux to embrace one IDE that works on all platforms so that I can just use the same project file and settings on all platforms. I don’t care if it is Visual Studio, Xcode, KDevelop, Eclipse or something else, as a cross platform developer it is annoying to have wildly different project files, default shortcuts, formatting, colours on all platforms. I know Eclipse and KDevelop are cross platform, but Microsoft and Apple haven’t ditched their own IDEs and embraced them. Google even stopped recommending Eclipse and use a new IDE :(

                                        Once that is sorted we can talk about which libraries are available on each platform, which are shipped in OSs by default and version hell :(

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                                          JetBrains’ IntelliJ IDEA might be a good-enough stopgap IDE for you. It is cross-platform, with a Java GUI that is heavily customized so it feels pretty native. And it has plugins that implement all the features of JetBrains’ other products such as WebStorm and RubyMine, so it work with many types of projects – Ruby, Python, C++, Java, Scala, etc.

                                          It can replace Xcode and Android Studio – it works with their project files. (In fact, Android Studio is made by JetBrains – it’s basically IDEA Lite.) The major thing IDEA doesn’t do is .NET. JetBrains doesn’t provide a .NET plugin – instead, it sells an addon for Visual Studio, ReSharper.

                                          1. 2

                                            Yah, I’ve been using IntelliJ IDEA for close to 15 years and on a reasonably performant machine (it runs very well on 3-year old hardware) it’s the best I’ve used. Like any tool, once you learn it (especially the keyboard shortcuts), I can write (admittedly verbose) Java extremely fast. Refactoring is incredible, and the suggestions it makes (because it has completely parsed your code and all of your dependencies) sometimes border on mind-reading.

                                            Also, since it’s itself written in Java, I can (and do) develop back and forth between my (aging) Windows box and my Linux box. Moving to a colleague’s Mac is only jarring because of the bizarre meta keys (command? cloverleaf? what?).

                                            There’s a reason Google decided to go with IntelliJ IDEA as the foundation for its Android Studio.

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                                              Thanks, I’ll give it a try, at work I port applications between Windows, Mac, iOS and sometimes Android so anything that can reduce the number of IDEs/project files would be great :)

                                            2. 1

                                              I don’t remember Google ever recommending Eclipse, but regardless, what do they recommend now?

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                                                The encouraged way of doing Android development was with an Eclipse plugin until earlier this year when they switched to an IntelliJ based IDE, Android Studio. It suprised me with how good an IDE can be.

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                                              Will be keeping my eye on this for sure.

                                              If I could replace GitHub in a way the rest of the world is OK with, that’d be freaking awesome.

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                                                My primary uses of GitHub are mostly git-independent: pretty diffs, easy history tracing and blaming across branches with a single click, etc. Are there any good (pretty) tools I can run locally for these things without running a full web+git service?

                                                1. 4

                                                  Some tools I use in OSX:

                                                  1. 3

                                                    I use Meld for all local diff work. It’s cross platform and has native Git support. Git also supports it as a difftool out of the box.

                                                    http://code.derekkozel.com/wiki/Git

                                                    http://meldmerge.org/

                                                    1. 2

                                                      I use these tools to accomplish those:

                                                      • Tower (paid) – A general Git GUI for OS X. It makes it easy to view diffs and history (though it lacks GitHub’s syntax-highlighted diffs). It can also do blaming of any version of a file, though it takes multiple clicks.
                                                      • fugitive Vim plugin (free and open-source) – you can easily view a blame of the current version of the file by running :Gblame.
                                                      • P4Merge (free) – for viewing three-way diffs, and editing the merged version. Part of the Perforce VCS, but you can install and run it standalone. Cross-platform.
                                                      1. 1

                                                        Pretty much the same, but also for the very nice community there is around pull requests.

                                                        This is what I use locally for the nice history navigation, commit history, etc. http://jonas.nitro.dk/tig/

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                                                      i also liked the ansi style that https://gentoo.org did for today, complete with loading animations.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Yeah, they did a really nice job, and pong was a nice touch. If anyone was wondering, they used BOOTSTRA.386 for the site theme

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                                                          I was disappointed that Gopher didn’t actually work though.

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                                                        Congratulations!

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                                                          The next line of the install guide is:

                                                          “(If you’re concerned about curl | sudo sh, please keep reading. Disclaimer below.)”

                                                          “This brings me to one other point: some people, and somewhat rightfully so, get very upset when we tell you to curl | sudo sh. And they should be! Basically, when you do this, you are trusting that the good people who maintain Rust aren’t going to hack your computer and do bad things. That’s a good instinct! If you’re one of those people, please check out the documentation on building Rust from Source, or the official binary downloads. And we promise that this method will not be the way to install Rust forever: it’s just the easiest way to keep people updated while Rust is in its alpha state.”

                                                          1. 4

                                                            I add these two lines to my ~/.inputrc configuration file. It allows for completely integrated reverse incremental search.

                                                            "\e[B": history-search-forward
                                                            "\e[A": history-search-backward
                                                            

                                                            For instance $ ssh<up arrow key> will show the most recent ssh command, another <up arrow key> will show the next most recent. I find this to be the number one productivity boosting change to bash. Learning pushd and popd are also good.

                                                            And don’t forget cd - for jumping to your previous directory.

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                                                              Just to be clear; this is readline configuration and not bash. Configuration options set in inputrc affect all shells linked to readline (eg, mysql and bash).

                                                              http://cnswww.cns.cwru.edu/php/chet/readline/readline.html#SEC9

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                                                                I hadn’t ever bothered finding out exactly what it was affecting. I haven’t encountered any negative side affects, but I don’t do a lot of work with mysql, or really other similar shells. Hmm… I’ll have to keep it in mind! Thanks.

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                                                              Pretty pictures! Because pretty pictures!

                                                              • smallpt, “Global Illumination in 99 lines of C++”
                                                              • pbrt, an open source production quality renderer which is accompanied by a 1000 page book describing it
                                                              • demos are fun to make too but sadly they tend not to be open sourced
                                                              1. 1

                                                                You’re a coder of Magellan?! Huge thumbs up, one of our all time favourites at CMUCC. :)

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Oh no, none of these are mine. My knockoffs are these are much less impressive! :d

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                                                                On a related note, the Novena open-hardware laptop just hit all their stretch goals, which means they’re including SDR boards with the laptops now: http://www.crowdsupply.com/kosagi/novena-open-laptop

                                                                Feel like this is a rabbit hole that could go pretty deep, but I’m tempted to dive in.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  I have one of the prototype Novena boards. Very very well designed. I’m really excited about them shipping SDRs, more radios in more hands, always a good thing.