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    This reminds me of this other recent story: https://lobste.rs/s/0ihysv/tlds_putting_fun_top_dns

    After a short period of initial experimentation, all current ARPA-Internet hosts will select some domain other than ARPA for their future use. The use of ARPA as a top level domain will eventually cease.” – RFC920

    1. 4

      That quote is from October 1984. Things change.

    1. 5

      This seems fun, and maybe a good tool for build proof of concepts. But I hardly see it as being useful for large projects. Or have I become old and grumpy?

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        As a stranger on the internet, I can be the one to tell you that you are old and grumpy.

        Ruby is definitely unusable without syntax highlighting… (Sadists excepted) Java is definitely unusable without code completion… (Sadists excepted) Whatever comes next will probably be unusable without this thing or something like it.

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          I’m confused… Ruby has one of the best syntaxes to read without highlighting. Not as good as forth, but definitely above-average

          1. 3

            Well, this is the internet. Good luck trying to make sense of every take.

            1. 2

              I used to think this way. Then I learned Python and now I no longer do.

              When I learned Ruby I was coming from Perl, so the Perl syntactic sugar (Which the Ruby community now seems to be rightly fleeing from in abject terror) made the transition much easier for me.

              I guess this is my wind-baggy way of saying that relative programming language readability is a highly subjective thing, so I would caution anyone against making absolute statements on this topic.

              For instance, many programmers not used to the syntax find FORTH to be an unreadable morass of words and punctuation, whereas folks who love it inherently grok its stack based nature and find it eminently readable.

              1. 1

                Oh, sure, I wasn’t trying to make a statement about general readability, but about syntax highlighting.

                For example, forth is basically king of being the same with and without highlighting because it’s just a stream of words. What would you even highlight? That doesn’t mean the code is readable to you, only that adding colour does the least of any syntax possible, really.

                Ruby has sigils for everything important and very few commonly-used keywords, so it comes pretty close also here. Sure you can highlight the few words (class, def, do, end, if) that are in common use, you could highlight the kinds of vars but they already have sigils anyway. Everything else is a method call.

                Basically I’m saying that highlighting shines when there are a lot of different kinds of syntax, because it helps you visually tell them apart. A language with a lot of common keywords, or uncommon kinds of literal expressions, or many built-in operators (which are effectively keywords), that kind of thing.

                Which is not to say no one uses syntax highlighting in ruby of course, some people find that just highlighting comments and string literals makes highlighting worth it in any syntax family, I just felt it was a weird top example for “syntax highlighting helps here”.

                1. 3

                  Thank you for the clarification I understand more fully now.

                  Unfortunately, while I can see where you’re coming from in the general case, I must respectfully disagree at least for myself. I’m partially blind, and syntax highlighting saves my bacon all the time no matter what programming language I’m using :)

                  I do agree that Ruby perhaps has visual cues that other programming languages lack.

                  1. 1

                    ’m partially blind, and syntax highlighting saves my bacon all the time no matter what programming language I’m using :)

                    If you don’t mind me asking - have you tried any Lisps, and if so, how was your experience with those? I’m curious as to whether the relative lack of syntax is an advantage or a disadvantage from an accessibility perspective.

                    1. 1

                      Don’t mind you asking at all.

                      So, first off I Am Not A LISP Hacker, so my response will be limited to the years I ran and hacked emacs (I was an inveterate elisp twiddler. I wasted WAY too much time on it which is why I migrated back to Vim and now Vim+VSCode :)

                      It was a disadvantage. Super smart parens matching helped, but having very clear visual disambiguation between blocks and other code flow altering constructs like loops and conditionals is incredibly helpful for me.

                      It’s also one of the reasons I favor Python versus any other language where braces denote blocks rather than indentation.

                      In Python, I can literally draw a veritcal line down from the construct and discern the boundaries of the code it effects. That’s a huge win for me.

                      Note that this won’t eventually keep me from learning Scheme, which I’d love to do. I’m super impressed by the Racket community :)

                  2. 1

                    For example, forth is basically king of being the same with and without highlighting because it’s just a stream of words. What would you even highlight? That doesn’t mean the code is readable to you, only that adding colour does the least of any syntax possible, really.

                    You could use stack effect comments to highlight the arguments to a word.

                    : squared ( n -- n*n ) 
                         dup * ;
                     squared 3 .  
                    

                    For example, if squared is selected then the 3 should be highlighted. There’s also Chuck Moore’s ColorForth which uses color as part of the syntax.

              2. 6

                Masochists (people that love pain on themselves), not sadists (people that love inflicting pain on others).

                1. 2

                  Ah, thank you for the correction.

                  I did once have a coworker who started programming ruby in hungarian notation so that they could code without any syntax highlighting, does that work?

                  1. 4

                    That count as both ;)

                  2. 2

                    Go to source is probably the only reason I use IDEs. Syntax highlighting does nothing for me. I could code entirely in monochrome and it wouldn’t affect the outcome in the slightest.

                    On the other hand, you’re right. Tools create languages that depend on those tools. Intellij is infamous for that.

                  3. 6

                    You’re old and grumpy :) But seriously, the fact that it’s restricted to Github Codespaces right now limits its usefulness for a bunch of us.

                    However, I think this kind of guided assistance is going to be huge as the rough edges are polished away.

                    Will the grizzled veterans coding exclusively with M-x butterflies and flipping magnetic cores with their teeth benefit? Probably not, but they don’t represent the masses of people laboring in the code mines every day either :)

                    1. 4

                      I don’t do those things, I use languages with rich type information along with an IDE that basically writes the code for me already. I just don’t understand who would use these kinds of snippets regularly other than people building example apps or PoCs. The vast majority of code I write on a daily basis calls into internal APIs that are part of the product I work on, those won’t be in the snippet catalog this things uses.

                      1. 4

                        I don’t doubt it but I would also posit that there are vast groups of people churning out Java/.Net/PHP/Python code every day who would benefit enormously from an AI saying:

                        Hey, I see you have 5 nested for loops here. Why don’t we re-write this as a nested list comprehension. See? MUCH more readable now!

                        1. 4

                          The vast majority of code I write on a daily basis calls into internal APIs that are part of the product I work on, those won’t be in the snippet catalog this things uses.

                          Well, not yet. Not until they come up with a way to ingest and train based on private, internal codebases. I can’t see any reason to think that won’t be coming.

                          1. 2

                            Oh sure, I agree that’s potentially (very) useful, even for me! I guess maybe the problem is that the examples I’ve seen (and admittedly I haven’t looked at it very hard) seem to be more like conventional “snippets”, whereas what you’re describing feels more like a AST-based lint that we have for certain languages and in certain IDEs already (though they could absolutely be smarter).

                            1. 2

                              Visual studio (the full ide) has something like this at the moment and it’s honestly terrible. Always suggests inverting if statements which break the logic, or another one that I haven’t taken the time to figure out how to disable is it ‘highlights’ with a little grey line at the side of the ide (where breakpoints would be) and suggests changes such as condensing your catch blocks from try/catches onto one line instead of nice and readable.

                              Could be great in the future if could get to what you suggested!

                            2. 3

                              Given that GH already has an enterprise offering, I can’t see a reason why they can’t enable the copilot feature and perform some transfer learning on a private codebase.

                              1. 1

                                Is your code in GitHub? All my employer’s code that I work on is in our GitHub org, some repos public, some private. That seems like the use case here. Yeah, if your code isn’t in GitHub, this GitHub tool is probably not for you.

                                I’d love to see what this looks like trained on a GitHub-wide MIT licensed corpus, then a tiny per-org transfer learning layer on top, with just our code.

                                1. 1

                                  Yeah, although, to me, the more interesting use-case is a CI tool that attempts to detect duplicate code / effort across the organization. Not sure how often I’d need / want it to write a bunch of boilerplate for me.

                            3. 1

                              it feels like a niftier autocomplete/intellisense. kind of like how gmail provides suggestions for completing sentences. I don’t think it’s world-changing, but I can imagine it being useful when slogging through writing basic code structures. of course you could do the same thing with macros in your IDE but this doesn’t require any configuration.

                            1. 5

                              If you’re coming from the SRE angle I’d file it under ‘monitoring’, if not, ‘performance’ might be apt.

                              I don’t think we have a huge problem with too many tags, but I find it a little bit too niche-y to warrant its own tag.

                              1. 2

                                I don’t know. In my definition, monitoring is a subset of observability. So technically, the tag would have a larger area. As for performance, I don’t think that would be in-topic either. Observability is about much more than performance, and vice versa.

                              1. 32

                                I love the idea!

                                If you’ll forgive some bikeshedding, would calling it post-mortem be better? When I first saw the title of this post, I thought it was going to be about some sort of argument-inciting event (which would normally be off-topic for lobsters, right?)

                                Unless the tag is also to be used for posts regarding notable current outages, etc, in which case incident makes more sense.

                                1. 21

                                  I think I like “incident” better than “post-mortem”, if only because it’s a bit broader (i.e. I think technical post-mortem posts would appropriately fall under the hypothetical tag of “incident”). I think being able to distinguish between regular news and interesting technical work done as a consequence of that news is valuable, though, so +1

                                  1. 12

                                    I tend to prefer retrospectives rather than post-mortem. The death analogy really isn’t necessary here.

                                    1. 3

                                      Even though I think that post-mortem is widespread and accepted terminology (especially in, say, gamedev circles), I like the slightly broader tag of retrospective as well–it feels like a tag we could use to denote a more general lessons-learned sort of submission.

                                      1. 5

                                        I think the spirit of what we’re trying to categorize are posts that cover specialized, targeted, technical responses to events (security breaches, production application failures caused by programming errors, etc). This is very different from, say, the retrospectives that a software team using the Agile methodology may hold to address problems that may have come up during their last sprint (don’t bikeshed this, I know Agile doesn’t have a patent on retrospectives or whatever, it’s just an example)

                                        So, for the sake of clarity, I think “incident” would be a better tag than “retrospective” (or “post-mortem” for that matter), because it sends a clear message to Lobsters users that an event occurred that warranted a response, and subsequently produced the technical material being posted.

                                        1. 2

                                          Sure!

                                          As long as @pushcx gives us some tag, I’m not going to bikeshed.

                                        2. 2

                                          “Retrospective” more naturally applies to what we use the “historical” tag for now, so this might be confusing.

                                          For this very narrow proposed case – where we’re looking for overviews of security incidents – we should probably pick a specific term. The justification for this tag (that it’s historically important & needs more exposure) goes away if we broaden it to include other kinds of postmortems (let alone other kinds of retrospectives), or if we invite users to misinterpret the purpose of the tag with a too-vague description of its purpose (which functionally results in the same thing, modulo pushcx going and deleting submissions).

                                      2. 8

                                        +1 for the idea but -1 for calling it post-mortem; incident or PIR/incident-review would be better

                                        1. 3

                                          I wish “after action report” was in general circulation. Not seriously proposing it, it would only be more confusing. I just think there are good reasons to dislike “postmortem”.

                                          1. 3

                                            Post-mortems are interesting in general, & I’d personally be more interested in reading the content of a dedicated project post-mortem tag. But I agree that incident reports themselves are more historically important and have lower visibility. Post-mortems should probably be spun out into a different request tbh.

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                                            This article could also have been “Why it’s critical that not everybody has administrator access to the AWS console”

                                            1. 7

                                              Or “please buy my book”

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                                              The only thing I can think of when I see home setups like this is: OMG, the ecological impact of their home setup. Both in term of daily electricity usage and rare materials.

                                              1. 6

                                                The rare materials argument can go both ways - most home labbers seems to be using recycled machines, extending the lives and usage of the rare materials. OTOH it probably also drives up the demand for the products in the first place.

                                                But running older server grade hardware is not good for your electricity bill.

                                                1. 1

                                                  I think you need to differentiate between “infra at home” and homelabs.

                                                  We had a whole desk setup full of HP Microservers at work, to play around with a few things in cluster mode - exactly the thing that would qualify as “homelab”. They usually didn’t run more often than a few hours per week. It’s hardware that mimics certain production criteria, exactly the stuff you can’t just recreate with VMs.

                                                1. 2

                                                  This is an interesting blog post, though I’m a bit disappointed that it only covers very basic stuff.

                                                  I’d recommend this book which is a great read if you want to learn more about ruby exception handling: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11799211-exceptional-ruby

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                                                    Well, there’s “rust” in “frustated”.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      I am not sure the store is truly 100% available. Imagine storing hashes of large files along with the associated file names. I believe some regions will fail in at most a couple of years.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Close to 100% would definitely be more appropriate here. I think focusing on the 100% misses the point of “super high availability” though.

                                                      1. 5

                                                        if I may lose my server and lose some important email

                                                        This is the biggest problem I have with most of the “host your own {x}”. Yes, I have to do maintenance, yes things may break. I can probably even deal with spam. I ran my own email a few times. As a secondary server though.

                                                        Because hosting means I need to have a looooong term backup&recovery strategy. Unless Google goes bust, I’m pretty certain I’ll be able to read an email from 2004 or 2005 or whenever it was I’ve switched to gmail.

                                                        And some of my blog attempts I can’t even find on the internet archive, let alone mails film that server. Or photos. Or whatever. I don’t even know what will happen in 10 or 20 years.

                                                        I’m curious as to how do people deal with that issue? Okay, having a newsletter from 2004 is probably my hoarding impulse problem and the inability to go back and clean it up now is just making it worse. Probably the same with the 100gb of photos I have (again, needs cleanup and only 30% are the everyday smartphone snaps).

                                                        What’s your strategy? What are your ultra long term backup and recovery plans?

                                                        What will you do if you give up on computers in 10 years?

                                                        1. 9

                                                          What’s your strategy? What are your ultra long term backup and recovery plans?

                                                          ZFS. Mirroring. A pair of 4tb drives is not prohibitively expensive in this age.

                                                          Periodic snapshots.

                                                          One offsite backup, in case of earthquakes,fires,etc. Lots of ways to do this. Could be aws glacier or similar. Or a third drive hosted at a workplace (if allowed) or at a friend’s or relative’s house. In the latter case, zfs send/recv.

                                                          What will you do if you give up on computers in 10 years?

                                                          My drives will keep in a closet if I decide to run off and live in the woods for a few years. Google data will not, if you stop paying the google bill.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            A pair of 4tb drives is not prohibitively expensive in this age.

                                                            As a reminder, SMR is still a problem, and even more so with a ZFS setup.

                                                            It’s not possible to just buy a pair of a 4TB drive. Extra effort is needed to avoid SMR.

                                                          2. 6

                                                            What’s your strategy? What are your ultra long term backup and recovery plans?

                                                            Tarsnap

                                                            1. 4

                                                              And upgrade plan. While setting everything up is fun as you learn some things, upgrading software and hardware will quickly become a chore. That’s why I avoid owning any server as much as I can.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Oh yes I totally forgot to mention maintenance and upgrades. These days the things like that are commodity.

                                                              2. 4

                                                                just keeping up with the maintenance is too much hassle for me to host anything on my own if I think it’s somewhat important. Imagine going on vacation for two weeks without a notebook to fix your mail server because it went down for whatever reason.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  I’ve embraced the impermanence of everything. I delete most mail I get. Not archive, trash and it gets auto-cleaned there.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    I use isync/mbsync. My personal email archive dating back to 2001 seems to be about 3.4GB, so I just download every mail I’ve ever received to all my devices. That’s mirroring taken care of. PCs and laptops need to be backed up anyway, so that’s backups taken care of. This strategy will work if your mail archive is 0.3, 30 or 300GB.

                                                                    I’m pretty certain I’ll be able to read an email from 2004 or 2005 or whenever it was I’ve switched to gmail.

                                                                    Mail is probably safe because the storage costs are negligable. But I wonder how long Google will allow people to store photos and video on their servers for free.

                                                                  1. 35

                                                                    I don’t think anybody would have dared suggest this if the issue had been in any country other than the USA.

                                                                    1. 11

                                                                      It’s interesting that the language that’s dividing developers is not a programming language. It’s English.

                                                                      The belief that social issues can be addressed by changing the language around them is one I’ve only seen among English speakers. Perhaps it’s time to drop this legacy language until they sort out a new standard.

                                                                      1. 11

                                                                        A lot of the concepts about the connections between language and social issues came out of Structuralism and Post-Structuralism, which were developed in France, and to a lesser degree Italy, by philosophers like Derrida, Foucault, Barthelme, and Eco before spreading to liberal-arts academics in most countries. There is a ton of this stuff in US progressive discourse (more than I’d like tbh), maybe more than in other English-speaking countries, but you may just see less of it from non-English-native people because they participate less in English-dominant forums.

                                                                        1. 3

                                                                          That’s quite possible. And I think that all languages have euphemisms and political correctness. (So, say, a politician might prefer jobseekers’ allowance over unemployment benefits to borrow an example from the UK). But at least over here it’s not considered desirable to talk like a politician.

                                                                          And this kind of request, were it asked in my native language, would typically met with complete incredulity. And I think it would be the same for bbatsov’s native environment. And think of the recent example of antirez (a compatriot of Eco if I’m not mistaken), who completely misread the opposition to master/slave terminology in Redis.

                                                                        2. 2

                                                                          The green party in Germany just proposed to remove “race” from Germany’s constitution’s Article 3 which states “Nobody shall face face disadvantages or advantages due to their sex, family, race, language, home and origin, belief, religious or political views.” so that we “unlearn racism” that way. (If having that word in there perpetuates racism, we should probably drop all the other qualifiers as well to ensure equality on those ends, too?)

                                                                          While that might be an Anglosaxon import (we have tons of those), from what I gather there’s more interest in the US in particular to keep the terms alive so that they can be used to reason about inequality (as in: without race, what’s “black” in “black lives matter”?).

                                                                          So I’m not sure if it’s really an English-only phenomenon.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Had this discussion a while ago, while the English version of the hacker ethics CCC version includes the word ‘race’, in the German version it was substituted with ‘Spezies’.

                                                                          2. 2

                                                                            well, it’s not english, it’s the anglo-saxon philosophical discourse that puts an emphasis on language as the tool we use to build realities and subjective experiences. It’s also spreading to the rest of the western world and part of the indian discourse is also entering the same sphere.

                                                                            In many places though is divisive and seen as a result of American soft power and to be rejected (also because it didn’t really bring big wins for the American Left).

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              language as the tool we use to build realities and subjective experiences

                                                                              What are some alternatives for me to ponder and research here? I’ve always intuitively believed this, and have read some materials in the field of cognitive science and philosophy, but nothing beyond undergrad-level course material.

                                                                              I’m curious as to what other models of cognition exist that posit language as a secondary or ancillary driver in our experiential self awareness. Have any suggestions?

                                                                              1. 4

                                                                                Well, all the essentialism , from Plato onward, states that reality exists regardless of perception. It’s not built but exists on its own with specific traits.

                                                                                Same for realist philosophers like Popper, that take similar positions .

                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                  In some eastern philosophy, particularly Buddhism, language is considered to be something along the lines of a cognitive pollutant. In order to understand the universe better it is often recommended to abstain from all forms of language completely for a period. I don’t want to put words into the mouth of a culture I don’t belong to and please someone correct me if I misrepresent anything, but that is my understanding of the take on language from that philosophical direction.

                                                                                  I certainly think that the question “What are some alternatives” does show something interesting: As someone immersed in language, no answer comes to mind. But I have a vague memory from the time I stopped using all language for 10 days (silent retreat), when language was not my main tool it did not really even seem like a useful tool for understanding. Only from within the language paradigm does it seem like language can really facilitate clear understanding. When language is not the main support of your entire ontology the feeling that some fundamental element of understanding is missing falls away too.

                                                                                  If you wish to research these ideas further I recommend spending a week or two working your way through the following reading list:

                                                                                  and not discussing it or anything else with anybody :-p

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    That’s a great question. I don’t know enough about the topic to answer you, but I can say that this is generally known as the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, and searching for that phrase should turn up years’ worth of reading material, pro and con.

                                                                              2. 1

                                                                                Yes, but it doesn’t matter, since the USA are culturally egemonic in the western IT space. The culture of IT is American culture. And I say as a person that doesn’t buy in the American political discourse (or tries to, at least). Nonetheless if the community is mostly american or sharing the american space of values and beliefs, this comment is irrelevant. You cannot claim something is less valid in the American discourse just because there’s a whole world outside that doesn’t care about these issues.

                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                I’m using nanoc, which I’m finding to be quite extensible, modular and powerful while remaining extremely easy to use.

                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                  I definitely understand what the author is trying to say, and agree with it. I don’t think his examples really apply though.

                                                                                  When he mentions switching CRMs and reducing the number of processes at the same time for example, I’d bet he could have reduced that number of processes with no CRM changes. And their new system will keep accruing new processes and be in the same state in a few years. When left unchecked, all systems will accrue processes, that will require shrinking.

                                                                                  Similarly, he mentions folks leaving the company and nobody to own the systems in their place. This is not an issue of complexity. It’s an issue of organization. There should always be more than one person aware of how the system works so this shouldn’t happen.

                                                                                  Finally, I would argue that yes, more complexity can bring less downtime, but it has to be the right complexity. In the first image he links (the pigeon in the bottle), that’s not redundancy at all. In order to have redundancy done right, there should have been two pieces of paper. One in the bottle, and the other one with the pigeon, flying. That would have been an increased complexity done right (or at least better).

                                                                                  1. 7

                                                                                    “More realistic approaches”:

                                                                                    Touch ID with heart rate measurement

                                                                                    What about when you’re paged in the middle of the night and need access? Your heart rate is probably going to be higher than normal because of the stress.

                                                                                    Face ID with a crazy machine learning model

                                                                                    Same here.

                                                                                    Panic button

                                                                                    Apple has that already.

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      Also there’s medication to control heart rate. Coffee is enough to increase it, I guarantee you there’s stuff that has a side effect of “slows it down”

                                                                                      1. 40

                                                                                        I like how Edward Snowden phrases it in Permanent Record.

                                                                                        I don’t have a quote easily available. But he basically says that you may think you have nothing to hide. But other folks may, and for good reasons (journalists, whistleblowers, minorities).
                                                                                        By saying you don’t care about privacy because you have nothing to hide, you’re making it dangerous for those folks, who will therefore seem suspicious.
                                                                                        Then, caring about privacy becomes an act of solidarity.

                                                                                        I’ve found that argument to work quite well with folks who aren’t in tech.

                                                                                        1. 17

                                                                                          Lifted from Wikipedia:

                                                                                          “Arguing that you don’t care about the right to privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don’t care about free speech because you have nothing to say.”

                                                                                          “When you say, ‘I have nothing to hide,’ you’re saying, ‘I don’t care about this right.’ You’re saying, ‘I don’t have this right, because I’ve got to the point where I have to justify it.’ The way rights work is, the government has to justify its intrusion into your rights.”

                                                                                          I usually argue that if they have nothing to hide, then of course they would allow me to view their banking info, medical information, all their IMs, and allow me to setup cameras in all rooms in their home. This typically leads to “Oh no, I won’t allow YOU to see that, but it’s okay for the government, because they wouldn’t do anything bad to me.”

                                                                                          And for that part of the argument, it’s taking a case of a government oppressing some group of people, and then either people gets it or gets bored of the discussion.

                                                                                          1. 4

                                                                                            I usually argue that if they have nothing to hide, then of course they would allow me to view their banking info, medical information, all their IMs, and allow me to setup cameras in all rooms in their home.

                                                                                            I actually found cases when they even did not care about that and replied with screenshots of texts they’ve just sent.

                                                                                            1. 7

                                                                                              They still have the choice of which screenshots to send, in this scenario. That’s a lot different than having complete access where you’d be able to choose which you thought were important.

                                                                                              1. 6

                                                                                                Fair point. In my experience many won’t think that far or have the imagination. Maybe it could be simplified by asking them how much the earn a month or a year. If they refuse to answer they basically showed that they have something to hide.

                                                                                              2. 4

                                                                                                There’s a nice movie called “Perfect strangers” which plays exactly on this topic. People gather for dinner and decide to read all sms aloud and answer all calls on speakerphone.

                                                                                            2. 6

                                                                                              Also people fleeing spousal or parental abuse!

                                                                                              Also even if someone doesn’t care about their privacy, they do still need integrity for their communications, i.e. they would probably prefer that randos with a copy of FireSheep can’t just steal access to their FaceSpacePinstagram account or mess with the content of the pages they’re reading or inject malware into the software they are downloading. The off the shelf solutions to integrity of data in transit also solve confidentiality of data in transit.

                                                                                              1. 4

                                                                                                While it might work on majority of adult people with common sense, I can’t imagine how teens or students who prefer comfort and “not caring” over anything would even take that as an argument at all. They’ll most likely say “it’s their own problem” or “i am not a journalist, I don’t care about them”. It’s quite sad they lack these bits of empathy, but it’s a bit larger topic on it’s own and I don’t want to derail this one too much. But it’s even more terrifying if you know they’re the future and with that attitude everything might get even worse than it is already, in privacy domain at least.

                                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                                  Quite frankly, I don’t appreciate the ageism employed here.

                                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                                    Thankfully, young people learn, just like we did when we were young and stupid. The presence of stupidity is no reason to be terrified. Vigilant, perhaps. Active, involved, definitely. But not terrified. There’s hope for them yet.

                                                                                                    1. 4

                                                                                                      When I was 15 I was one of those “I have nothing to hide” people. Then I was 16 and started dating, and suddenly I didn’t want my parents reading my messages. So, there’s that argument too.

                                                                                                      But yeah, don’t give up on youth just because they’re too immature to understand everything right now. They will grow and learn.

                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    I use Nanoc. I wrote it, initially about 13 years ago, and is still maintained and semi-actively developed. It uses Ruby and does not hide that, and if that’s fine for you, Nanoc could be a good fit.

                                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                                      I’m using nanoc too, and I really like it. Thank you for it, denis.

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                                                                                                      This excellent talk brought a YAML realisation to me: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8xLxNje30M

                                                                                                      YAML is not terminated. So when we send it over HTTP, it’s hard to make sure we actually sent the entire content and the connection didn’t get closed midflight.

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                                                                                                        CSS and JS files aren’t terminated either. HTTP has a content length header for a reason?

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                                                                                                          YAML has document start “—” and document end “…”, but a single file/stream can contain multiple documents.

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                                                                                                          How can this be spam when I’m not the author of this story?

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                                                                                                            It reads like a marketing brag piece, and the product is apparently in “private alpha” so nobody here can test its claims.

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                                                                                                              Spam is the closest thing to “this is a bad article”.

                                                                                                              Alternatives:

                                                                                                              • Off-topic -> clearly about IT/Technology/Sciences
                                                                                                              • Already Posted -> not already posted (the link would appear at the bottom)
                                                                                                              • Broken Link -> link works just fine

                                                                                                              So, we are left with “Spam”: a catch all, which includes “Rubbish” but also “Marketing”, “Low Effort”, “Just Absolute Bollocks” and more.

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                                                                                                                Spam is the closest thing to “this is a bad article”.

                                                                                                                IMO off-topic is better used for this, e.g. when someone posts something that would fit in better on HN, even if it’s tech-related, it can be off topic for this site.

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                                                                                                                  Now this is interesting. You felt the need to “downvote” this story because you don’t like it, and you chose the only flag which could possibly be interpreted as “bad content”, under the assumption that on-topic “bad content” is something that you should be able to flag. I feel like you’re abusing the flag in doing so, but I also imagine that this form of abuse is quite common. In any case, it’s quite “low effort” on your part.

                                                                                                                  I suggest we would all be better served if you would instead articulate what you dislike about the story.

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                                                                                                                    Oi dude, don’t assume things out in the wild and then feel like you should be the one preaching the solution.

                                                                                                                    I just replied to OP’s comment, nothing else.

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                                                                                                                  I’m used to languages and development/orchestration tools being open source or at least something you can download an play with. Since I can’t do that, then or all practical purposes, as far as I’m concerned this Dark thing does not actually exist. And since it doesn’t exist, then reading about all of its impressive (and likely inflated) claims was a huge waste of my time.

                                                                                                                  (I didn’t flag, downvote, or upvote the story, however.)

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                                                                                                                    Commenting on a story acts like upvoting it, so you should probably flag it (that’s what I’m doing right now to cancel out my comment).