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    I think its a shame my kids have to grow up with this kind of bullshit video games to deal with. I don’t have any way to explain to my kid “no the games you can get on phones aren’t real” he just gets pissed. I hate this cancer in video games.

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      I’m really happy to hear the Advisory Committe for AMP has some sanity on it. I’m not in the business but as a user I get really annoyed when I find myself inadvertently on an AMP page. Just let me go to the damn website!

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        Yeah. Everything moving to the cloud means that more stuff is controlled by fewer people.

        I wonder if Linux being ‘containerized’ kind of side-stepped the power that it had? Windows 10 is going to ship with a whole Linux kernel inside of it. So as a developer who just wants to Get Stuff Done, why would I even bother with Free Software?

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          We use OneNote and Word docs scattered about on SharePoint. There’s nothing good about it.

          Luckily we also have a GitLab instance, so I tend to try and put new technical documentation on a GitLab wiki associated with a repository. Then I can clone the wiki repository and grep it if it ever gets large enough to warrant fast text search.

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            Same. We have a big fat OneNote. Hard to update, hard to search, hard to index, hard to link to specific things. I don’t love OneNote.

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              We use OneNote and Word docs scattered about on SharePoint. There’s nothing good about it.

              Having a little experience with this, yes, it’s terrible. Search in SharePoint is next to useless and document uploading is baffling (seriously, creating directory hierarchies is an incredible chore). And good luck with history.

              If this is your setup, I pity you, and seriously consider switching to something else. It’s this kind of setup that made me not hate Confluence.

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              I don’t work there, and I’m not sure what system it is, but the Stripe docs are my gold standard.

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                Those look great, though I haven’t used them in any working capacity. For me the gold standard is Mozilla’s Web Docs. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/

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                  as far as I know those are erb templates compiled to static files (sprockets seems to be used for css/js) then served with nginx. so a pretty simple custom solution but written with a lot of care for details (and clearly a lot of time is dedicated to make those great).

                  apparently their internal tools are pretty good too.

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                  “What in the Crockford is going on?”

                  That line made me giggle.

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                    I came to say the exact same thing.

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                    It pains me to see how happily people are getting herded around by GAFAM with dirty tricks like this, but I honestly don’t know what to do. I haven’t managed to convince even a single person to use “freer” software in years.

                    Once upon a time I would’ve tried to spread the Holy Word of open-source (or at least user-respecting) software like Firefox and Linux, but I’ve mostly given up on that. In my experience, “normal people” associate these things (yes, even Firefox) with “technical people”, so they’re too scared to try. (And actual technical people are too stubborn ;-D)

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                      My last job was a shop of 20 or so developers. We all had the same standard-issue macbook. I could tell mine apart because I put a Firefox sticker on it. I evangelized quite a bit with my teammates. By the end of my three-year tenure there, I had convinced nobody that at least supporting Firefox in our web applications was neccesary, and nobody to use Firefox as their main browser.

                      I left that job a few weeks ago, and I learned from my old boss that he and two others started using Firefox because they missed me and my ridiculous evangelism.

                      It’s okay to give up, or take a break, from evangelizing because it’s kind of exhausting and puts your likability with others at risk. But I think it’s hard to tell when you’re actually being effective. There’s no real feedback loop. So if you’re tired of it and don’t want to do it anymore, by all means stop evangelizing. But if you want to stop just because you don’t think you’re not being effective, you may be wrong.

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                        You can’t convince “normal” people by saying it’s “freer” and open source (unfortunately, not even more private) - they don’t care about this stuff.

                        I convinced my wife to try FF once quantum came out saying “it is much faster”. She got used to it.

                        I managed to convince a teammate to use FF because of the new grid inspector.

                        People only care about “what’s in it for me”.

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                          Of course that’s what they care about, I know. IMHO not having a multi-billion-dollar corporation breathing down your neck is a pretty big plus, but I guess that’s just a bit too abstract for most people, as you seem to be implying.

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                        I object to the historical tag. I use IRC on a daily basis. (In fact, it’s how I keep in touch with most of my social circle)

                        I do think that the most important thing IRC could do is implement server side history, which solves the main issue: catching up on history after joining a channel or going offline.

                        Everything else feels like fluff.

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                          On the other hand, I consider lack of history a feature, a highly desirable feature.

                          I don’t need to be notified of everything that happens, I don’t need to know all of the history.

                          IRC is like walking into a bar. If there’s an interesting conversation, you jump in. And when you’re away, if something important happened, someone else will fill you in. Otherwise, it wasn’t important.

                          Just miss out without fear. It’s okay. Do other things.

                          If you need persistent and slow communication, use a different protocol, but leave chat protocols as ephemeral and forgettable.

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                            This is not usually how IRC is used in practise. In practise people use bouncers or “irssi in screen forever” to get the history client side. Better to let the protocol solve the problem most people seem to want, and if you don’t want history configure your client not to fetch or show it.

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                              I don’t know how usual this is. Lots of people don’t use bouncers. Some use bouncers. The way we use #octave in Freenode is memoryless; #emacs in Freenode has a no public-logging policy (just a politeness convention) and #mercurial in Freenode also has people coming and going all the time. If something happened and people are talking about it, I ask in #mercurial and people will give me the context. Nobody has ever said to me, “get a bouncer, ya n00b!”

                              I don’t know if most people want persistent history but I certainly don’t.

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                                Sure it is. Source: JordiGH and I hang out in several of the same bars^Wchannels. (Sup.)

                                I currently use “weechat in tmux forever” (formerly “ERC in screen forever”). However, I never actually bother to scroll back except to search for my own name to see if anybody was looking for me.

                                Once in the past decade, I reviewed my entire buffer for a specific channel because there was “drama” going on when I got back and I wanted to know what happened. The privilege to do so is what the chanops and opers there grant me when they allow my client to idle.

                                Honestly, after you join a few big channels and a lot of small ones, “keeping up” is neither possible nor worth it. Do you “keep up” with newly uploaded youtube videos? :)

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                                  I do irssi in screen forever (call me old-fashioned ¯\_(ツ)_/¯), and that’s not really my experience. I don’t ‘keep up’, but – well, there are a couple of things. #1 is that when I join I’d like to have some context for what’s going on, and drama that causes me to want to scroll up quite a bit happens a lot more often than once in 10 years. Another thing is that sometimes, when it’s been a quiet day, I’ll go on and see that it’s not more than a screenful of text since last time I joined, which provides a nice sense of continuity. Additionally, just being already connected makes for a generally nicer experience. It makes communication asynchronous because there’s not an expectation that if you’re connected, you’re available; so, you can ignore people (or, to put it more generously, wait till later to talk to them). If you join a channel and immediately ask for help with something, it seems a lot stickier and you’re a lot less likely to get a response, than if you’ve been there for a while.

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                                    Ah, yes. I agree with your description; I have experienced those things you describe. Which makes me wonder, why did I describe my experience differently?

                                    I think I figured it out… Social channels are different than technical channels. I do in fact review the full buffer of technical channels (if they are low-volume enough). I just hadn’t thought about it when posting my previous comment! Thanks.

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                                      Huh. Generally I don’t look at what happened in technical channels. Generally I come, ask/answer a question, but when I’m not there, I’m not there. Only exception is when there’s some bickering in the c channel (it happens a lot), I read backscroll so I can get an informed opinion and join in. Social channels, I know the people there so I care about what they said while I wasn’t there.

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                                What do you do to chat with friends? Coordinating an event over email with 7-8 people is painful.

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                                  I coordinate an event over email with 7-8 people; I don’t know, it works for me. I just did that last week.

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                                    Hm, to each their own I guess. For us, someone will usually just ask who’s free tonight and whose house is free, where we’re eating etc etc and within a few hours we’ve sorted it out and whoever comes comes.

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                                      Yep, email works great for that.

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                                I’ve always been saying that if you want a paper trail, you want email. There’s nothing wrong with it, it works. Chats are for real-time conversations, and those don’t mix well with having a paper trail. Whenever I’m forced to use Slack in companies where it’s the main way of communication, it’s obvious how inconvenient it is to hold a conversation over a few days (or time zones) buried in a constant stream of messages not separated into topics.

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                                  Wow - your post made me remember something I haven’t ‘felt’ about the web since back when Facebook’s instant messages feature was separate from it’s ‘mail’ feature, probably 2008. I remember reading that they planned on combining the two. At the time, I thought “How can they possibly do that? My IMs and my Mails are completely different ways to communicate, because one is real-time and the other asynchronous.

                                  Facebook and Slack messaging work the same now. Real-time, with the paper trail. Both real-time and asynchronous. Stopped starting at your phone or your desktop client? Too bad, you’re now behind.

                                  I miss being able to differentiate between a message I was expected to read instantly vs a message I could read on my own time.

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                                  That’s certainly one of the biggest drivers that’s forced my scrum team to transition to AWS Chime.

                                  Being able to have persistent messages regardless of client connection state is an absolute deal breaker for us. Coordination becomes much MUCH more difficult otherwise. We used to use IRC, and it got to the point where I was the only one with ZNC working in the whole team :\

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                                    I’m always a bit surprised by the staying power of IRC. This kind of feature is the reason I have always used XMPP for my chatrooms.

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                                      XMPP is an awesome protocol IMO, the issue is that there does not seem to be any decent clients.

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                                        What platform and style are you looking for? I’m partial to irssi-xmpp myself – and Conversations is king on Android. There are hundreds of clients of every kind, so hard to list at once until I know what you’re after :)

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                                        Pardon my ignorance, I’ve used Jabber a bit way back in its infancy so I can’t recall - does XMPP inherently record server side traffic like that?

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                                          The ability for a multi user chat to play back recent history when you join has been part of the protocol basically as long as the ability to have chatrooms at all. How much history is configured by room admin (usually).

                                          More recently there are extensions to make this even better, but in practise that original feature covers everything I’ve wanted.

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                                          Matrix seems to have figured out how to bridge different networks well. Does XMPP have similar success in that area, and if not, do you have any theories why? Is it a technical thing or just a matter of not enough critical mass?

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                                            Yes, XMPP has always had bridges (we usually say “gateways” or “transports”) to different protocols. When I first started using XMPP most of my contacts were on MSN Messenger, and I talked to them seamlessly.

                                            These days, there’s Spectrum as a gateway to everything in libpurple, transwhat to WhatsApp, biboumi to IRC, cheogram.com to SMS, even a few to Matrix :)

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                                              So you guess it was mostly poor salesmanship kinda problem that not many people use those?

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                                          Everyone I know who cares about persistent messages on IRC runs an IRC bouncer (e.g. ZNC). It’s pretty easy to set up..

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                                            You’re assuming several things:

                                            1. Bedrock infrastructure to run znc on. Not at all easy or guaranteed in the enterprise.
                                            2. Enterprise IRC has the same lax auth strategy that Freenode or other ‘open’ IRC servers do.
                                            3. That younger people give enough of a shit to go through this admittedly minimal effort when they can just use SlickCord or whatever and not think about it.
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                                              Eh, I was just pointing out that there are options besides “completely change the IRC server”, that users can do to use IRC with persistent messaging.

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                                              You still have to pay for, secure, and patch a server though. Unless you run ZNC at home, in which case you’d probably want to isolate that machine from your LAN.

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                                          Clearly the author has never done Heroin or heck smoked a pack of cigarettes.

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                                            In my teenage and early 20s, when this was first published, I had a problem with World of Warcraft exactly the way the author describes. I also struggled with nicotine addiction. The problems he describes are very real - and they continue today.

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                                              Indeed. Several years ago I also had a gaming problem, which eventually got “fixed” by my university workload. I recently sold all my virtual items, and was shocked by how much they were worth… I dread to think how big a loss I made. They got me, they got me good. And I don’t want the same to happen to others.

                                              Yes, pleasures are an important part of life, and a lot of tech revolves around that. But our brains aren’t programmed to moderate positive impulses.

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                                              Having known people on heroin, there’s definitely parallels between that addictive behavior and how people use modern tech. They can even look similar. The heroin addicts would lay around staring at TV’s doing nothing but getting high. Had trouble interacting with people, kind of zoned out, or not liking bright lights. Folks motionless staring at a screen with a controller in hand getting highs on meaningless level ups for hours on end often look and act kind of similar. Both decline creative skills. Unless it’s a creative game which is its own debate.

                                              With social media, there are interactions between people by design. They seem like a degraded mode of what social interactions or writing can be vs what focused authors or stage debaters do. They’re optimized to quickly throw out something small (talking points) to get Internet points in terms of upvotes, likes, shares, etc. The rewards reinforce the social behavior that works in those apps. The more people do that, the more their brains get optimized for receiving and delivering that. I’d argue that combo is hugely bad for society given the complexity of most issues we face. The corporate media was doing it first. Now, we get to do it to ourselves on social media, too.

                                              To top it off, it’s extraordinarily hard to get people to stop using these products once they start. They also go through withdrawls. I doubt they’re as severe as heroin for most people. They’re there, though. The analogy fits if we keep in mind heroin is a more extreme version of the current phenomenon. Author even states that themselves.

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                                                Yes. Addiction to social media has been normalized. Nobody bats an eye at the teenagers sitting around all staring at their phones together, or the couple at a restaurant both lost in their screens.

                                                It’s just downright weird. Everyone seems mostly okay with their addiction.

                                                I grew in a time when I kept my computer use to myself, taking away the lesson that a balanced life was good. Now the general public (who’d have judged me for my nerdy tinkerings) acts socially inept in public due to said technology, and I’m supposed to pretend that it isn’t profoundly strange.

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                                                  The tech geeks have managed to shape mainstream culture in their own image, and it ain’t pretty.

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                                                  Absolutely, and it’s all designed to suck people into addiction. Social media, YouTube, many online games… their business models want people to spend as much time as possible on their platform, to show more ads, collect more data, sell more virtual items, etc. So from a (greedy) economic perspective it’s the “right” thing to do.

                                                  See also this older Lobsters post: The Tech Industry’s Psychological War on Kids (yes, it’s Medium, but this one is pretty good). It’s by a child psychologist describing how his profession’s knowledge is being used in unethical ways.

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                                                    Yeah, that’s one of the articles I was thinking about when replying to voronoipotato. Thanks. Relevant quote:

                                                    “This alliance pairs the consumer tech industry’s immense wealth with the most sophisticated psychological research, making it possible to develop social media, video games, and phones with drug-like power to seduce young users.

                                                    These parents have no idea that lurking behind their kids’ screens and phones are a multitude of psychologists, neuroscientists, and social science experts who use their knowledge of psychological vulnerabilities to devise products that capture kids’ attention for the sake of industry profit. What these parents and most of the world have yet to grasp is that psychology — a discipline that we associate with healing — is now being used as a weapon against children.”

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                                                    Technology or really any pleasure in life isn’t a replacement for treatment of mental health issues. Pointing out escapes as the problem is part of the problem, imho. While you might have an opinion formed on anecdotes making a parallel between the two is dangerous for several reasons.

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                                                      It’s not an anecdote when a wide chunk of society are as absorbed, hooked, non-productive, and anti-social as folks taking heroin. That’s more like empirical data in the making. There’s also my anecdotes on top of it. We’re also saying tech is causing mental health issues (addictive behavior), not a replacement for treatment.

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                                                        Actually it is an anecdote and mental health professionals are rightly cautious about what they consider an addiction. It’s not things that people simply enjoy doing more than you.

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                                                          I’m one of the anecdotes. I’m capable of both enjoying things and knowing I enjoy them too much. Being able to detach oneself for introspection is important. Health professionals have already defined properties and negative effects of addictive behavior. Some of what people are doing with technology matches some of them. I mean, I’d love to see a large study of it by experts to see their side of it. They might be doing it.

                                                          Until then, I have to combine existing terms and methods with the behavior of millions of people to call the trend something. Getting absorbed in meaningless activities that take up more and more of their time while diminishing their mental capacities and wallets seems like an addiction. Even many of them say they’re hooked even if they didn’t want to be. No surprise given people designing the games intend for them to be addictive. Some even hire psychologists or leverage prior work on that (esp conditioning).

                                                          If it wasn’t addictive as they wanted, why are so many people hooked on it mainly benefiting the supplier? And giving up more of their benefits all the time like being forced to watch ads on game platforms?

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                                                            So you’re trying to claim something is habit forming, I won’t debate that. There’s a medical definition of addiction and again it’s not strictly wanting to do a thing. I don’t want to make claims because I’m not a mental health professional. However as I understand it the danger of labeling it as an addiction is that it leads people to think it’s a root cause and not symptomatic of other mental health issues. This is the danger of labeling technology as Heroin. You can try to claim all you want that it’s heroin, but it’s imho pretty insulting to people who have had to been there for real addicts. I have no trouble setting aside my phone for a day or a week or a month, yet I use my phone pretty regularly. I don’t know that I could say the same for actually addictive things.

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                                                              “There’s a medical definition of addiction and again it’s not strictly wanting to do a thing.”

                                                              I’ve been describing how people feel like they have to do a thing whether they really want it or not. They get hooked in, it causes them problems, maybe those around them, and has negative effects on their mind and body. Let’s compare it to medical definition. Fits a-e for quite a few people.

                                                              “but it’s imho pretty insulting to people who have had to been there for real addicts”

                                                              I just ran it by one who got off heroin. They saw the comparison long as it’s hyperbole given heroin being on extreme end. We agreed small amounts of marijuana is probably better comparison in terms of actual effects. Author is trying to make a different point, though, that ties into how opium was introduced into society, modified their behavior negatively disguised as a positive, and eventually we had to legislate it. On that end, it fits better than marijuana given it’s about societal impact more than the strength of the actual drug.

                                                              “I have no trouble setting aside my phone for a day or a week or a month, yet I use my phone pretty regularly.”

                                                              Then you’re not addicted to it. A lot of people can’t seem to get off it. They even ignore their jobs or children to do non-achievements in virtual worlds. They might be addicted to it. Different effects for different people. Like recreational drugs.

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                                                                The argument you just gave implies that there’s either no constructive use for the technology or that there is a constructive use for heroin. In this way there is likely a much closer analogy that still communicates the habit forming nature of social media for reward seeking individuals and the predatory nature of the corporations involved. That’s really my whole beef. Talking an individual who survived is perhaps not as constructive as talking to a parent of one who didn’t in this context.

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                                                                  The argument you just gave implies that there’s either no constructive use for the technology or that there is a constructive use for heroin.

                                                                  Where do you get this strange framing? No, my argument is comparing a known property of one thing, addiction, to another thing. The broader article also talks about how there’s a high which people thought was beneficial to both. Then another connection. Those are a bit more abstract given the high and ramifications of heroin are stronger than Farmville. Your framing is arbitrary. Addictiveness of this, of that, and consequences is what I’m mostly doing. I need no other properties or arguments for their existence to compare this single property.

                                                                  “Talking an individual who survived is perhaps not as constructive as talking to a parent of one who didn’t in this context.”

                                                                  It’s interesting you bring up social media. I’d not normally think of them as a survivor as you said. The next generation after me has to be connected to friends to achieve things in life. At least, that’s what they think. They follow each other on these outlets. The reinforcement mechanism is so strong as to possibly become part of their identity. Trying to quit social media might be really, really hard for these kids with the few that achieve it or dodge it considering themselves something like survivors. There’s definitely going to be a high cost for many of them.

                                                                  Still, this is an abstract comparison. The magnitude of heroin rewards and withdraws on individual is much higher than most of these other addictive things. There’s a partial, but not full, comparison.

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                                                                    I mean I grew up on social media, and I quit some of them and didn’t quit others. However like totally quitting all social media is like quitting talking to your friends.

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                                                  In a similar vein, here is a bootstrap theme based on geocities: http://code.divshot.com/geo-bootstrap/

                                                  I use it all the time for CTFs.

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                                                    Was Bootstrap one of the reasons the web became boring? The first framework where every site looked the same?

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                                                      I don’t know if it was the first per se but it in my mind, it had the most impact in setting us on the current path.

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                                                      Just applied this to the work app. Gonna have to seriously resist pushing this live on April 1st for a bit. (Our users hate change sadly, as per usual.)

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                                                        Could you maybe just add a button to turn it on or something? Like Twitter’s night mode switch except instead of turning everything dark it turns everything back to the 1990s.

                                                        Also if you were really feeling this prank you could monkey-patch XmlHttpRequest so that it played a dialup tone and called setTimeout() before sending a request. You know, for that 90s* internet speed feel. (Now that I actually write this comment I think I’m legitimately going to add this as a mode to the bottom-right corner of my website.)

                                                        [*]: I was not alive during 80% of the 90s but I’m told everything was very very slow.

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                                                        Sadly for a very old version of bootstrap. Any newer versions for v3 or v4?

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                                                        I love this story, because mine is almost exactly the same! I loved a few specific ps2 games and I wanted to make my own, so I searched for information on the web. This was when google was the main search engine but it wasn’t a verb yet. I landed on cplusplusprogramming.com or something and being really confused.

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                                                          I remember using that site to learn about calling winmm.dll function from VB6 in order to play background music for a text game I was making. The code quality was horrible, but still, it was there for us. I also remember learning a lot from PHP documentation comments a few years later.

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                                                            Yeah! I remember in 2012 or so I switch from .NET to a PHP project at my day job, and as a very green programmer, I was so impressed at how much easier it was to find the answers I needed in the PHP docs.

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                                                            Great point. It’s good to drill into new programmers heads to mock out external dependencies, but part of a healthy application development lifecycle is making sure external dependencies are working as intended.

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                                                              Also known as Availability Testing. I think that the bigger lesson from the article is that reliance on third party APIs without an SLA is risky.

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                                                                Indeed, though it sounds like in this particular case, the third-party api being down wasn’t that big of a deal.

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                                                                great writeup!

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                                                                  Cool writeup! Unfortunately, as a boring line-of-business app C# developer, most of it went over my head :(

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                                                                    As someone who knows basically nothing about networking this was a great read. thanks

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                                                                      Here’s my 2019 take.

                                                                      Two big changes since last year:

                                                                      1. I bought a nice chair, a second hand Hermann Miller Aeron. Best 250€ I invested in my setup. The benefits are radical, my post long-session back pain completely disappeared.
                                                                      2. A Kinesis Advantage 2 keyboard. I have been bad-mouthing fancy keyboards for the last few years, but after hearing some crazy wrist pain stories from my friends/co-workers, I decided to bite the bullet and take a pro-active approach to this whole mess. The thumb cluster and the wells makes it really comfortable. However, it’s all made of plastic, it clearly doesn’t worth 375€, it’s damn overpriced. But hey, they are the only one selling this kind of keyboard, I guess that’s kind of expected.

                                                                      Regarding the desk, I still use my DIY hand crafted wooden joined desk. It ages pretty well. I also still use my m-audio 2x2 sound card together with a shotgun mic for the sound/videocalls. I store my music on my server, I mount the music repository using FUSE and sshfs on my machines. A raspberrypi 3 is connected to my audio setup and stream the music from this very same server using MPD.

                                                                      I have an arduino nano + some sensors + some custom scripts to display the temperature, humidity and C02 concentration on i3bar.

                                                                      Which leads us to software. At this point, I’m pretty much all in in NixOS. I try to setup everything declaratively. I merged all my various dot files/custom ~/.local/bin scripts into my NixOS configuration. Everything is in one repo, the same configuration tree is shared across my machines.

                                                                      Other than that, I still use the classic I3 + neovim + ghcid + firefox combination.

                                                                      [edit]: I totally forgot to talk about my AMAZING green slide whistle. Great to vent out during some annoying bug fixing session and creating a bit of comic relief during long video meetings. My neighbors hate it.

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                                                                        What CO2 sensor do you use?

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                                                                          A Chinese module based on a MG811.

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                                                                          Shout out to the MX518, I still use mine from over a decade ago

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                                                                            Aeron is super worth it, even at full price. I have one that is (I think) 19 years old now. Had to replace a wheel one time, that’s it.

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                                                                              “However, it’s all made of plastic, it clearly doesn’t worth 375€, it’s damn overpriced. But hey, they are the only one selling this kind of keyboard”

                                                                              Business opportunity is what Im seeing in this.

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                                                                                There seem to be quite a lot of custom keyboards brewing recently, esp. with the proliferation of 3D printers. As to ones that appear similar to a Kinesis Advantage, I’m interested in the Dactyl and Dactyl Manuform. Xah Lee seems rather impressed.

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                                                                                I’m envious of your chair - where’d you get it that cheap?! :D

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                                                                                  I bought a used Aeron with a chrome base back in 2012 from London on eBay, and had it shipped to Sweden. I think the chair was around £300. Companies sell them for cheap all the time in London. I ended up selling it again, at a £50 profit, even after the shipping I paid!

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                                                                                    On a french local advert website (similar to Craiglist for the US).

                                                                                    In my experience, you often get a better deal from these websites than eBay for this kind of stuff. Not only you cut out the transaction/delivery fees, but the market also tends to be a bit less competitive for the buyers.

                                                                                    If you’re not in a hurry and automate your search process with some web scrappers, you should get some pretty good deals :)

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                                                                                  Wow that’s awesome. I have so many questions, but one surfaces to the top in my mind:

                                                                                  Can you make a build for me that disables shift-ctrl-q?!?!

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                                                                                    That’s a tremendous amount of detail!