Threads for elboru

    1. 5

      +1, although I recommend the Type-S variant.

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        Yes, I have the original at home, and I tried to bring it into the office, and my co-workers wanted to kill me. I ended up getting a type-S variant for the office and keeping my other one at home. I absolutely love this keyboard!

      2. 3

        I have multiple keyboards, but my favorite for working is a Topre Realforce 87u which uses similar switches, while also giving arrow keys.

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          My favourite variant is Drop’s Tokyo 60

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            I can second this. I recently got the Tokyo60 and have been absolutely loving it.

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              I want to see what you’re talking about but everything I click on there wants my email address.

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                Sorry, for some reason drop requires an account to view products. I’ll link you an image instead.

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              I use this keyboard for work and absolutely love it. I’m grateful CTRL is in the CAPS LOCK position.

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                I’m currently typing this from a Happy Hacking Keyboard Pro 2, and I enjoy it for the most part. But I do miss the lack of physical arrow keys.

                1. 1

                  I used an HHKB Lite2 for years and years (over a decade, I believe): it has an inverted-T in the lower right. They are an odd rectangular shape, which I imagine is why I have never seen a mechanical keyboard with the same feature. I thought it was basically the perfect layout for a long time.

                  An under-appreciated feature is the placement of the ESC, \, ~ and BS keys. Once you’re used to it, you really don’t want to go back.

                  There are only one and a half problems with the HHKB. The first is the CTRL key. Yes, replacing Caps Lock with something useful is good, and yes that location is far better than way out on the left and right corners. But it is not ideal for touch-typing, in which one should press modifiers with the opposite hand.

                  The second half-problem is the staggered key layout. I believe that a non-staggered (‘ortholinear’) layout may be more ergonomic.

                  These days I am experimenting with the Boardwalk and XD75 layouts, but with heavy inspiration from the HHKB. I have Hyper, Super (GUI or ‘Windows’), Alt, Ctrl, Raise to the left of the space bar and Lower, Ctrl, Alt, Super & Hyper to the right. The Caps Lock location is used for Compose — since it is not a modifier, having a single version is okay.

                  For arrow keys on the Boardwalk I have Lower+EDSF (like WASD, but fingers never leave the home position). On the XD75 the arrow is in the centre.

                  I know for a fact that I do not want to go back to a full-size board with a keypad, and I know I want to stick with mechanical keyswitches. I may someday want to get into something even more ergonomic, such as a split keyboard or Ergodox.

                2. 1

                  I have used this, as well as a Realforce 87U, for a few years each. Both are great but these days I prefer the Leopold FC660C (with Type-S switches). Specifically with the Hasu PCB Mod, which is also available for the HHKB2, one can turn the board into the custom tool of programmers’ dreams.

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                    Does anyone find value on missing the F keys or the arrow keys?

                    1. 4

                      the form factor being small has value, because it means the device takes up less physical space on your desk and is much more portable. It’s very easy to toss into a bag with a laptop, because it’s only going to be as wide as the laptop itself.

                      The problem with the missing arrow keys is that in order to use the arrow keys you have to use a chorded combination (with the fn key to the right of the right shift). That’s fine when you’re using the arrows on their own, and the key combos are easy to learn and remember and use. Where it falls down is when you want to use the arrow keys and press other keys simultaneously that do NOT want the fn key held down, which is a struggle for games that use arrow keys. That’s the only situation in which I’ve found it bothersome, but that may be more of an issue for me than most since I’m a game developer.

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                        I personally use a fullsize + ten-key WASD v2, which is pretty good. The whole tiny keyboard thing (people are unironically making 40% size boards on /r/mechanicalkeyboards) makes very little sense to me.

                        I miss my old huge compaq keyboard, with F13-F24 on a strip down the left side :)

                    1. 1

                      I noted quite a lot of rules for myself. Some are more specific, others more abstract. I refined the list over the years.

                      https://wiki.nikitavoloboev.xyz/focusing/rules

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                        I gave a quick look at your wiki, it made me consider having a wiki for myself too. I really liked the idea, I don’t know if I would have the courage to put it online though, I’ll probably censure myself if I do.

                        For how long have you maintained the wiki? Where did you get the idea?

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                          Got the idea from this wiki: https://github.com/yoshuawuyts/knowledge

                          Setup the wiki in 2017. Been updating it daily ever since.

                          Updating tools to access it too.

                      1. 7

                        True, but there’s a lot more that doesn’t work or works weirdly on Linux. It’s not the way it’s supposed to be, but it’s how it is. Windows and Mac get you a standard, decent GUI for most things. Linux is much more customizable but you often need a lot of work to get basic things working. That’s not ideal, but in practice, that’s the tradeoff.

                        Example: I recently installed MX Linux on my desktop, which has an HDMI monitor and a soundcard. The volume slider doesn’t do anything and the brightness of my monitor is not adjustable via a graphical tool (although it can be done with a bash script).

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                          Windows and Mac get you a standard, decent GUI for most things. Linux is much more customizable but you often need a lot of work to get basic things working.

                          I recently installed MX Linux on my desktop

                          If you use a more mainstream distribution, you will have fewer issues. If you use the distribution chosen by your hardware manufacturer, you will have basically zero issues (e.g. Pop on System76 machines, Manjaro on Manjaro-branded laptops). This is the #1 misconception regarding free desktops in my experience and I think it’s quite important not to perpetuate it.

                          It’s basically true that “more customized” = “more weirdness”, but a lot of desktop Linux stuff is far, far to the left on that scale.

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                            If you use a more mainstream distribution, you will have fewer issues.

                            I don’t like this argument. If he had said he was using Ubuntu there would be a whole bunch of linux users claiming he should be using a “real” distro.

                            If you use the distribution chosen by your hardware manufacturer, you will have basically zero issues (e.g. Pop on System76 machines, Manjaro on Manjaro-branded laptops).

                            So what you’re saying is that linux works ok if used on machines specifically made for it?

                            1. 2

                              I don’t like this argument. If he had said he was using Ubuntu there would be a whole bunch of linux users claiming he should be using a “real” distro.

                              I agree that that is reprehensible behaviour. The fact that some other people do reprehensible things like that doesn’t affect the validity of my argument.

                              So what you’re saying is that linux works ok if used on machines specifically made for it?

                              Much like all other popular operating systems, yes. Free desktops (including the BSDs!) are the only OSes which really have the unenviable task of running on hardware that is actively hostile to them, with the exception of Windows on Apple hardware, which last I checked was doing much worse than, e.g., Linux on Lenovo hardware, and requires either an expensive vendor support package or lots of tinkering.

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                                Free desktops (including the BSDs!) are the only OSes which really have the unenviable task of running on hardware that is actively hostile to them

                                To some extend, this is also true for Windows. People expect to run Windows on every computer, hardware vendors produce drivers of terrible quality, Microsoft has to deal with the fall-out. I guess this is the reason Windows ships a lot of Microsoft-provided drivers by default.

                                The other side of the coin is that Intel and AMD actively develop drivers for Linux and contribute to the X.org and Wayland ecosystems, and we still have all the problems that we have. I am using GNOME, because so far it has dealt best with Wayland, HiDPI screens, and connecting additional screens. But man, the desktop experience is broken, many applications are invisibly in the background (Spotify, Skype, Dropbox) since GNOME has decided that tray icons should be killed with fire [1]. GNOME becomes extremely laggy after a few days without a restart (e.g. there is a noticeable latency when I am typing this). None of the browsers support accelerated video playback out of the box (it’s supported by the drivers/libraries, but I guess having two APIs for video accelerations does not help). Etc. etc.

                                For me the biggest problem is that we (as the FLOSS Unix community) haven’t made much progress in the last 10-15 years. Of course, there has been a lot of awesome work in the form Wayland, Vulkan, HiDPI support, etc. But the delta between, say, Linux in 2005 and Windows/macOS has not really become smaller than the delta between Linux now and Windows/macOS. The Linux desktop is still a thousand paper cuts, that some of use can live with because there are other attractions.

                                [1] Sure, there is an extension, but it often does not render the menus correctly and introduced noticeably more gnome-shell crashes.

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                                  I am using GNOME, because so far it has dealt best with Wayland, HiDPI screens, and connecting additional screens. But man, the desktop experience is broken, many applications are invisibly in the background (Spotify, Skype, Dropbox) since GNOME has decided that tray icons should be killed with fire [1].

                                  Yeah, I agree that this is a terrible decision, on par with MS’s decision to totally break the Start Menu user experience (which is what eventually pushed me completely away from Windows). In fact I’m considering going to KDE for this reason.

                                  But, in a lot of ways, that’s the point, for me. I have that choice. On Windows, I don’t have a choice but to use the new Explorer and Start Menu experience which I really dislike.

                                  For me the biggest problem is that we (as the FLOSS Unix community) haven’t made much progress in the last 10-15 years. Of course, there has been a lot of awesome work in the form Wayland, Vulkan, HiDPI support, etc. But the delta between, say, Linux in 2005 and Windows/macOS has not really become smaller than the delta between Linux now and Windows/macOS. The Linux desktop is still a thousand paper cuts, that some of use can live with because there are other attractions.

                                  This does not comport with my experience; I started using free desktops around 2012 and, for me, even in just those 8 short years the difference is night and day. 99% of the time, my stuff “just works”.

                          2. 5

                            That used to be fun when I was younger, those issues were challenges that I loved to solve and I learned a lot while solving them. But now, after some years, those issues start looking more like obstacles than challenges.

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                            Pi Hole (network level ad-blocking for all devices in our home network) and Spotify server controlling the speakers in our living room, using raspotify.

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                              How do you turn on/off the speakers? Any recommendations?

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                                Haha yes, that’s the part that could do with some improvement I guess. We just don’t since power draw is very low with speakers on, or we do it manually as the speakers are in an accessible spot. Same with volume control btw, haven’t yet figured out how to control device volume from Spotify on other devices.

                            1. 4

                              Contemplation of time. How is it that “time passes” for humans, when in actuality there is only this moment that is of infinite duration (aka. eternal moment) in which things exist and change dynamically?

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                                Tempus fugit.

                                It’s great to take a giant step back and spend some time ruminating on big picture thoughts like this. I should do this kind of thing more myself.

                                I find myself thinking about how time passes more and more as I age.

                                1. 2

                                  I love this kind of questions, probably there are some answers to my questions, maybe I am not asking the proper questions, but the other day I was wondering something similar: If we can divide an hour by minutes, then minutes to seconds, seconds to milliseconds and so on, can we divide to the infinite? I would say no, since it would take an eternity to pass from one second to the other, therefore there must be an indivisible time span so time can pass from one to another. I’m probably making wrong assumptions, I should read what experts think.

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                                    You may find this article interesting, re: division.

                                    The contemplation I was referring to is more of an experiential awareness than an intellectual exercise. As in, really getting curious and focusing on what is happening right now like a predator focuses on its prey. Getting really fascinated, and figuring out just how exactly time “moves” … and if it doesn’t move, what is happening? Is it actually the case that time moving is an illusion, and that “I” create this illusion … and can I actually find this out for myself by paying attention to what is happening now? Etc.

                                    It can get to be fascinating, and at that point you start to become aware of how “you” (including “your” feelings) operate - because time & identity are intimately related.

                                1. 11

                                  Rust, I think.

                                  I’d also like to get my Spanish up to snuff.

                                  (¿Donde estan las langostas que hablan Espanol?)

                                  1. 3

                                    Lo hablo (más o menos), pero casi nunca. Tengo familia en España y (del lado de mí madrastra) Argentina. Sería buena practicarlo más.

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                                      Aquí hay una langosta, cuando gusten practicar :)

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                                      Are you planning to pick up Rust for something specific or just for fun?

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                                        Fun mostly, though if I end up liking it I have a good candidate for a large-ish project that I think would be a good fit

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                                        Aquí estámos! Saludos! 👋🏽

                                      1. 4

                                        I have read 79 books since last month’s thread on about August 1st.
                                        Here are the few I would recommend.

                                        • Prisoners of Geography - 5 stars This book explains a lot of international relations in terms of geography.
                                        • Dead Water Creek and Cold Dark Matter - Alex Brett, 4 stars. This is a two book mystery series. The first book has the main character investigating scientific grant fraud in Vancouver, BC.
                                        • Katie - Michael McDowell, 4 stars. This is quite dark historical horror.
                                        • Blood Rubies - Michael McDowell, 4 stars. Horror.
                                        • Antique Dust - Robert Westall, 4 stars. Horror short stories.
                                        • Gideon the Ninth - Tamsyn Muir, 4 stars. I can’t do justice to this book but karen’s review is excellent.
                                        • The Survivor - Dennis Parry, 4 stars. Horror.
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                                          As someone who loves horror I’m always looking for good recommendations. Thanks for this.

                                          Also…79 books in roughly two months? Impressive.

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                                            That’s amazing. How much time do you spend reading? How did you learn fast reading? Do you always read fast?

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                                              How?! :o How do you read so fast?! I’ve only managed to read 29 since the beginning of the year! Any tips/tutorials you can point us to?

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                                                That’s impressive! I have Gideon the Ninth waiting to be read, so I’m glad to hear you enjoyed it.

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                                                English: I know you mean programming languages, but since I’m not a native English speaker I consider English a tool. Something I don’t like about English is how random written English seems, specially vocals, they have so many sound variations, that’s specially difficult when you learn vocabulary by reading, sometimes I know the written word, but if someone pronounces it I can miss it if that’s the first time I hear it.

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                                                  This happened to me today. I was saying “init” to a co-worker, and he didn’t understand at first because of my pronunciation.