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    Possibly a bit Apple centric. Better title: why i like my old macbook pro more than the new one.

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      I’d never have clicked on that one! :)

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        I clicked on it expecting a Thinkpad, came away very disappointed. >:(

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          You might be new to marco.org? I don’t think he’s ever uttered the word “thinkpad” before. Apple fanboyism at it’s proverbial best.

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        Ubuntu breaking itself with updates while still being less secure than openbsd is what made me switch to Openbsd stable on my laptop. Everything just works, even months later, and was surprisingly easy to setup (Openbsd was a breeze for me compared to arch linux).

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          Going from ubuntu to openbsd! What a jump haha How was the transition? I always imagine it very hard to make.

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            I have been all over the place … something like ubuntu -> arch -> fedora -> debian -> ubuntu -> debian -> ubuntu -> openbsd.

            I just practised installing openBSD once in a VM to make sure I could get i3 working and after that there was no problem. The older I get, the more I appreciate things that don’t change under your feet.

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              The older I get, the more I appreciate things that don’t change under your feet.

              So, there’s this OS called “Debian”… :-)

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                I tried updating a Debian stable machine that I had not touched for six months. it blew up in my face. I’ve never had that happen with OpenBSD.

                ever

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                  As a counterpoint, I’ve had Debian machines that have gone through 10+ years of upgrades without problem. For example, i’m currently in the process of retiring a VPS that was first installed in 2005 (it’s only being retired as it’s still running a 32-bit userland, has become too much of a snowflake and needs to be rebuilt using configuration management tools).

                  That said, I’ve never had a problem with the OpenBSD upgrade procedure either :)

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                    Agreed, debian stable is ok if you stick in the same stable version. Upgrading between stable releases can be… problematic.

                    With openbsd its mostly just a matter of reading release notes to see what config files need to be looked at. I’ve never had a linux distro be as straight forward as openbsd in this regard. And that is why it runs all my routing duties.

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                      Regular security or point release upgrades never break, so I imagine you’re talking of an upgrade to a new major release. Do you remember which version you’ve tried to upgrade to and what went wrong exactly?

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              TIL: we need more managers sitting in rooms enforcing processes. Cool.

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                I think it’s more like we still need the usual amount of managers enforcing process.

                Just like scaling a server backend requires certain coordination technologies (load balancers, container orchestration), scaling a human organization does too (including managers sitting in rooms reviewing change plans).

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                Not surprised. News at 11.

                So what useful things do lobsters people put in their motd?

                My machines are named after Father Ted characters. So, naturally, all motds contain quotes from Father Ted characters. Rewatching an episode with a particular character to hunt for quotes while setting up and naming a new machine has become a ritual of mine :)

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                  Shameless plug, I made this years ago to make pretty pictures for my motd: https://max.io/bash.html

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                    This is amazing, you should post this

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                    So what useful things do lobsters people put in their motd?

                    We (Wikimedia Foundation) show: kernel and distro version, server role in puppet, last puppet run, machine installation date and last login. For example:

                    Linux cp1049 4.9.0-0.bpo.2-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 4.9.13-1~bpo8+1 (2017-02-27) x86_64
                    Debian GNU/Linux 8.8 (jessie)
                    cp1049 is a upload Varnish cache server (cache::upload)
                    The last Puppet run was at Fri Jun 30 07:30:49 UTC 2017 (22 minutes ago). 
                    Debian GNU/Linux 8 auto-installed on Fri Mar 13 17:57:50 UTC 2015.
                    Last login: Thu Jun 29 15:51:39 2017 from bast3002.wikimedia.org
                    
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                      Nothing. Our servers are terminated and replaced on a frequent enough basis that spending time on MOTDs would be a waste.

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                        That’s very pragmatic, but also a bit boring. No time for easter eggs?

                        If no other lobster replies to this thread, yer all a bunch of boring bishops ;)

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                          some figlet and lolcat action for me. variety is the spice of life.

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                            Our easter eggs mostly end up in some other part of the stack. SSH-ing into a machine is pretty much reserved for major outages.

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                              I miss Easter Eggs. The Word and Excel ones were fun to show kids in class. Also a lesson about the threat of subversion where management and/or customers didn’t notice an entire game hidden in their office software. “Code rah… review? I don’t think we’ve done anything like that over here…” ;)

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                                No time for easter eggs?

                                No time for celebrity worshipping.

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                                  Easter eggs don’t necessarily involve a personality cult. They can just be silly jokes.

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                              I only put the most import things: http://ix.io/y6E (best viewed in terminal)

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                                So what useful things do lobsters people put in their motd?

                                The server hostname.

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                                  I normally use a template and regenerate stats about the system using cron. Things like tailing the last few entries from auth.log etc, nothing too fancy.

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                                    > cat /etc/motd
                                    mksh: cat: /etc/motd: No such file or directory
                                    

                                    guess I’m a boring bishop too :(

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                                      Nice to see another Father Ted fan here - I’m surprised you haven’t created a custom fortune data file just for the purpose :)

                                      Although almost all of my personal systems are configuration managed, I do still log in to them regularly (they’re halfway between pets and cattle) so a customised MOTD is something I’ve been meaning to look at for ages. Something showing load, pending package updates, etc (I only automatically install security updates). One day…

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                                        I normally use update-motd to show a summary of key services the machine handles. Helps to prevent “oops” moments because you forgot what services it runs and reboot/etc.