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    Urgh, damn it. I guess I should download Wikipedia while Europeans like me are still allowed to access all of it… It’s only 80 GB (wtf?) anyway.

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      That and the Internet Archive. ;)

      Regarding Wikipedia, do they sell offline copies of it so we don’t have to download 80GB? Seems like it be a nice fundraising and sharing strategy combined.

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        I second this. While I know the content might change in the near future, it would be fun to have memorabilia about a digital knowledge base. I regret throwing to the garbage my Solaris 10 DVDs that Sun sent me for free back in 2009. I was too dumb back then.

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          Its a bit out of date but wikipediaondvd.com and lots more options at dumps.wikimedia.org.

          I wonder how much traffic setting up a local mirror would entail, might be useful. Probably the type of thing that serious preppers do.

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            You can help seeding too.

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          Actually Wikipedia is exempt from this directive, as is also mentioned in the linked article. While I agree that this directive will have a severely negative impact on the internet in Europe, we should be careful not to rely on false arguments.

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            Do you remember the encyclopedias of the 90s? They came on a single CD. 650MB.

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              To be explicit, this is not a “modern systems are bloated” thing. The English Wikipedia has an estimated 3.5 billion words. If you took out every single multimedia, talk page, piece of metadata, and edit history, it’d still be 30 GB of raw text uncompressed.

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                Oh that’s not what I was implying. The commenter said “It’s only 80 GB (wtf?)”

                I too was surprised at how small it was, but them remembered the old encyclopedias and realized that you can put a lot of pure text data in a fairly small amount of space.

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                  Remember that they had a very limited selection with low-quality images at least on those I had. So, it makes sense there’s a big difference. I feel you, though, on how we used to get a good pile of learning in small package.

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                  30 GB of raw text uncompressed

                  That sounds like a fun text encoding challenge: try to get that 30GB of wiki text onto a single layer DVD (about 4.6GB?)

                  I bet it’s technically possible with enough work. AFAIK Claude Shannon experimentally showed that human readable text only has a few bits of information per character. Of course there are lots of languages but they must each have some optimal encoding. ;)

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                    Not even sure it’d be a lot of work. Text packs extremely well; IIRC compression ratios over 20x are not uncommon.

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                      Huh! I think gzip usually achieves about 2:1 on ASCII text and lzma is up to roughly twice as good. At least one of those two beliefs has to be definitely incorrect, then.

                      Okay so, make it challenging: same problem but this time an 700MB CD-R. :)

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                        There is actually a well-known text compression benchmark based around Wikipedia, the best compressor manages 85x while taking just under 10 days to decompress. Slightly more practical is lpaq9m at 2.5 hours, but with “only” 69x compression.

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                          What does 69x compression mean? Is it just 30 GB / 69 = .43 GB compressed? That doesn’t match up with the page you linked, which (assuming it’s in bytes) is around 143 MB (much smaller than .43 GB).

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                            From the page,

                            enwik9: compressed size of first 10e9 bytes of enwiki-20060303-pages-articles.xml.

                            So 10e9 = 9.31 GiB. lpaq9m lists 144,054,338 bytes as the compressed output size + compressor (10e9/144,054,338 = 69.41), and 898 nsec/byte decompression throughput, so (10e9*898)/1e9/3600 = 2.49 hours to decompress 9.31GiB.

                          2. 1

                            Nice! Thanks.

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                Wikimedia Foundation, the non-profit organization behind Wikipedia (Alexa top 5) as well as all sister projects such as Wiktionary, Wikiquote,.. is hiring Site Reliability Engineers, Application Security Engineers and more. All positions in San Francisco or remote.

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                  Just saw that you’re pretty new there, how is it going?

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                  The whole “value gap” theory, on which this proposal is based, is flawed.

                  The European Commission spent €360.000 to prove that copyright infringement negatively affects sales. The study they (we) have paid for concluded that, with the exception of recently released blockbusters, there is no evidence to support the idea that online copyright infringement displaces sales. So they’ve tried to keep it secret, till Julia Reda published it: https://juliareda.eu/2017/09/secret-copyright-infringement-study/

                  Julia’s post on the proposed upload filters is also an interesting read: https://juliareda.eu/2018/02/voss-upload-filters/

                  There must be a lack of better things to spend EU money on, I guess.

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                    The whole “value gap” theory, on which this proposal is based, is flawed.

                    But oh so profitable!

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                    Possibly a bit Apple centric. Better title: why i like my old macbook pro more than the new one.

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                      I’d never have clicked on that one! :)

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                        I clicked on it expecting a Thinkpad, came away very disappointed. >:(

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                          You might be new to marco.org? I don’t think he’s ever uttered the word “thinkpad” before. Apple fanboyism at it’s proverbial best.

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                        Ubuntu breaking itself with updates while still being less secure than openbsd is what made me switch to Openbsd stable on my laptop. Everything just works, even months later, and was surprisingly easy to setup (Openbsd was a breeze for me compared to arch linux).

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                          Going from ubuntu to openbsd! What a jump haha How was the transition? I always imagine it very hard to make.

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                            I have been all over the place … something like ubuntu -> arch -> fedora -> debian -> ubuntu -> debian -> ubuntu -> openbsd.

                            I just practised installing openBSD once in a VM to make sure I could get i3 working and after that there was no problem. The older I get, the more I appreciate things that don’t change under your feet.

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                              The older I get, the more I appreciate things that don’t change under your feet.

                              So, there’s this OS called “Debian”… :-)

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                                I tried updating a Debian stable machine that I had not touched for six months. it blew up in my face. I’ve never had that happen with OpenBSD.

                                ever

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                                  As a counterpoint, I’ve had Debian machines that have gone through 10+ years of upgrades without problem. For example, i’m currently in the process of retiring a VPS that was first installed in 2005 (it’s only being retired as it’s still running a 32-bit userland, has become too much of a snowflake and needs to be rebuilt using configuration management tools).

                                  That said, I’ve never had a problem with the OpenBSD upgrade procedure either :)

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                                    Agreed, debian stable is ok if you stick in the same stable version. Upgrading between stable releases can be… problematic.

                                    With openbsd its mostly just a matter of reading release notes to see what config files need to be looked at. I’ve never had a linux distro be as straight forward as openbsd in this regard. And that is why it runs all my routing duties.

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                                      Regular security or point release upgrades never break, so I imagine you’re talking of an upgrade to a new major release. Do you remember which version you’ve tried to upgrade to and what went wrong exactly?

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                              TIL: we need more managers sitting in rooms enforcing processes. Cool.

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                                I think it’s more like we still need the usual amount of managers enforcing process.

                                Just like scaling a server backend requires certain coordination technologies (load balancers, container orchestration), scaling a human organization does too (including managers sitting in rooms reviewing change plans).

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                                Not surprised. News at 11.

                                So what useful things do lobsters people put in their motd?

                                My machines are named after Father Ted characters. So, naturally, all motds contain quotes from Father Ted characters. Rewatching an episode with a particular character to hunt for quotes while setting up and naming a new machine has become a ritual of mine :)

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                                  Shameless plug, I made this years ago to make pretty pictures for my motd: https://max.io/bash.html

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                                    This is amazing, you should post this

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                                    So what useful things do lobsters people put in their motd?

                                    We (Wikimedia Foundation) show: kernel and distro version, server role in puppet, last puppet run, machine installation date and last login. For example:

                                    Linux cp1049 4.9.0-0.bpo.2-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 4.9.13-1~bpo8+1 (2017-02-27) x86_64
                                    Debian GNU/Linux 8.8 (jessie)
                                    cp1049 is a upload Varnish cache server (cache::upload)
                                    The last Puppet run was at Fri Jun 30 07:30:49 UTC 2017 (22 minutes ago). 
                                    Debian GNU/Linux 8 auto-installed on Fri Mar 13 17:57:50 UTC 2015.
                                    Last login: Thu Jun 29 15:51:39 2017 from bast3002.wikimedia.org
                                    
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                                      Nothing. Our servers are terminated and replaced on a frequent enough basis that spending time on MOTDs would be a waste.

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                                        That’s very pragmatic, but also a bit boring. No time for easter eggs?

                                        If no other lobster replies to this thread, yer all a bunch of boring bishops ;)

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                                          some figlet and lolcat action for me. variety is the spice of life.

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                                            Our easter eggs mostly end up in some other part of the stack. SSH-ing into a machine is pretty much reserved for major outages.

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                                              I miss Easter Eggs. The Word and Excel ones were fun to show kids in class. Also a lesson about the threat of subversion where management and/or customers didn’t notice an entire game hidden in their office software. “Code rah… review? I don’t think we’ve done anything like that over here…” ;)

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                                                No time for easter eggs?

                                                No time for celebrity worshipping.

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                                                  Easter eggs don’t necessarily involve a personality cult. They can just be silly jokes.

                                            2. 3

                                              I only put the most import things: http://ix.io/y6E (best viewed in terminal)

                                              1. 3

                                                So what useful things do lobsters people put in their motd?

                                                The server hostname.

                                                1. 2

                                                  I normally use a template and regenerate stats about the system using cron. Things like tailing the last few entries from auth.log etc, nothing too fancy.

                                                  1. 2
                                                    > cat /etc/motd
                                                    mksh: cat: /etc/motd: No such file or directory
                                                    

                                                    guess I’m a boring bishop too :(

                                                    1. 2

                                                      Nice to see another Father Ted fan here - I’m surprised you haven’t created a custom fortune data file just for the purpose :)

                                                      Although almost all of my personal systems are configuration managed, I do still log in to them regularly (they’re halfway between pets and cattle) so a customised MOTD is something I’ve been meaning to look at for ages. Something showing load, pending package updates, etc (I only automatically install security updates). One day…

                                                      1. 2

                                                        I normally use update-motd to show a summary of key services the machine handles. Helps to prevent “oops” moments because you forgot what services it runs and reboot/etc.