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    please don’t. When learning you make a lot of mistakes. And writing a tutorial with this mistakes doesn’t help other learners when they read this.

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      And even if you don’t make mistakes, most people will misunderstand their own process and come up with unhelpful things like monad tutorials: https://byorgey.wordpress.com/2009/01/12/abstraction-intuition-and-the-monad-tutorial-fallacy/

      But now Joe goes and writes a monad tutorial called “Monads are Burritos,” under the well-intentioned but mistaken assumption that if other people read his magical insight, learning about monads will be a snap for them.

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        Came here to say something similar to this.

        Learn new technology through writing a tutorial about it, but don’t publish it.

        There’s so much misinformation by well-intentioned learners.

        I’m not trying to diminish the importance of journaling either! Journaling != Tutorials.

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          Publishing your tutorial gives it an audience, which means someone may (hopefully!) come along and correct you on your errors. This is invaluable.

          I also disagree with this negativity. Make it clear at the top of your tutorial that you’re a beginner and you may not have it all right. But with that caveat, publish away.

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            I think we’re discussing the same thing but disagreeing on the semantics of it.

            • Belief #1: Sharing how you learned something can be a valuable tool to someone else.
            • Belief #2: Tutorials can seem like they’re from a source of authority, so a lack of a disclaimer could be hazardous.
            • Belief #3: Imposter syndrome is real. We need to mitigate misinformation, but not at the expense of people being afraid to share.
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              Publishing your tutorial gives it an audience, which means someone may (hopefully!) come along and correct you on your errors. This is invaluable.

              Absolutely invaluable, but at the very same time, the exposure spreads the misinformation to more readers, potentially doing more harm than good. I don’t think a disclaimer is enough. I think the word “tutorial” implies some authority, unfortunately.

              I think a better way is to humbly share a report of your findings so far, with questions and an (as appropriate) admission that you don’t understand everything. Julia Evans is masterful at this style.

              As a reader new to the topic, you get the benefit of an explanation of what she currently understands (which is often from a beginner’s mind), and usually some questions to seek answers to on your own. As an expert of the topic, you are invited to share more, or clarify, or correct (and this happens a lot on twitter, and/or HN, etc). But you’re doing so from a place of empathy (you want to be helpful) instead of from a place of disgust (ugh! why is this tutorial so bad!).

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          I don’t need this tutorial (already familiar with VS Code) but upvote for providing a tutorial in text form and not doing a youtube video!

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            • some smaller personal (mostly static) websites
            • a bigger forum for a community I was active couple of years ago
            • mail (postfix / dovecot)
            • a private gitlab instance
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              you could use http/2, so roundtrips are not the big issue anymore (or just for really old clients)

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                HTTP/2 reduces the round-trip time because the same connection is used for both requests, but there is still the issue of doubling the network transmission time, which is not compressible for physical reasons, except if I use HTTP/2 Push to preventively “push” the JSON data to the client.

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                very interesting article what one can do with data from strava and what you can do to be more anonymous

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                  lots of newer pages have kind of modern design - but there are some huge sites which remain old style

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                      Thank you for the invite @emrox! Yes, and also added Perl during the lunch break :) Feel free to suggest other lists on GitHub: https://github.com/listcommunity/support

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                        Thank you @binarymax @nickpsecurity. I’ve been reading Lobsters for a while but it’s nice to be able to contribute :)

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                          This is really nice. Thank you for putting this together. And welcome to Lobsters :)

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                            Welcome to Lobsters! Good idea trying to integrate and organize the lists. :)

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                              the author of list.community contacted me on Twitter to let you know he added the C++ section to the page

                              https://list.community/fffaraz/awesome-cpp

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                                No Perl either!

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                                  There’s Javascript and Golang, it’s okay!

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                                      I stand corrected, thanks! I didn’t find it on the linked front page.

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