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    At work, I’m cleaning up a revert I had to do last week.

    At home, I’m starting a side-project I’ve been thinking about for some time. Hopefully, I’ll get something up and running within a few days that’s ugly but functional.

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      The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, Shoshana Zuboff

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        I’m about half way through this one. It, and the original paper, are eye opening, even if you’re already familiar with how money is made off data.

        I think one is the biggest takeaways I’ve had so far if the concept of behavioral futures.

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        I finished Tribe. It’s about the connections in small groups, particularly tribes and combat units. It was a pretty good, but very short read.

        I just started Bowling Alone, which is supposed to be about the decay and revival of American communities.

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          Personally, I don’t really care much about “tracking” per se. I don’t like it very much, but it seems like a reasonable compromise with getting easy-to-access content on the cheap, it’s not like humans are looking at most of the data they gather anyway, and most of the big problems are present in other cases. I’d be more worried about someone looking at my email inbox than I would at the ad profile.

          What pisses me off about online ad networks is the lack of accountability or security. You get ads that pretend to be operating system dialogs, ads that are simply dishonest about where they lead, ads that integrate Monero miners, ads that include zero-day exploits, ads that ship PUPs, and ads that simply break the page they’re in. Even if I was actually interested in something that was advertised, I’d never actually click it anyway, because I’d be scared it would lead to a Vsearch install or worse.

          The kind of crap that ad networks carry would never be tolerated if they weren’t getting money in exchange for running them. Online adverts should not be able to include anything that wouldn’t be allowed by GitHub-Flavored Markdown. There are ad networks that work like this, such as the Hiveworks banners (pure images), the older version of AdWords, and sponsored posts on The Orange Site.

          More than that, ad servers need quality control. In a simple, ideal, case, sites that serve false or malicious ads should suffer legal consequences.

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            I disagree with it being a reasonable compromise. In most other business transactions, we’re aware of what we’re paying for the service or product and what we get in return.

            The transaction, in this nature, is so heavily skewed towards the advertisers and consumers of that data it’s grossly unfair.

            We are not aware of what they are collecting, as this post itself indicates in the identification process alone, nor the true cost of it.

            Whenever we give up data we pass the rights of disclosure, along with the data, to whatever company collected it. It’s not just that small amount of data, it’s the right to share it with whoever they choose.

            What they collect, how the collect, and who they share it with (the cost) is largely hidden from one side of the transaction. This is intentional and not representative of how most fair transactions occur.

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            I don’t use them frequently, but I do find them pretty easy to vgrep for and delete when I do.

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              I’m running a half marathon tomorrow morning, the second race in a four-race series.

              I also just finished upgrading a Dell Optiplex 790 as a cheap, mid-range gaming system - I want to try out Ultima Underworld Acsendant. I haven’t played any games in years, and this is the first one that caught my attention.

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                Are they all half marathons and how long do you get between each race?

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                  Yes, there are 4 half marathons, about one per month starting in May, all in mid-Michigan. This will be the second race of the series. I thought it would an interesting challenge this summer, and it forced me to train up early.

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                The family and I are headed to the beach for the weekend.

                I’m going to continue reading Exhalation while lounging about and probably won’t be on the computer much.

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                  This is pretty interesting and reminds me of not running swap space on machines. That way they crash and kill instead of thrashing disk until the machine is unusable.

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                    This looks like a great license for both the company and self-hosting users. It seems to provide a lot of freedom while protecting their interests as well.

                    I really liked their assessment of the tiered model. It definitely seems like it would almost always lead to a watered down free version.

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                      This is a good write-up of the different modular kernel projects being developed. I’ll definitely be taking a look a few of them. I suppose I should start with looking at Fuschia. It seems like the most likely candidate to have a more mainstream appearance in the “near” future.

                      I was hoping for more of a what the era of a modular OS kernel would look like and how things are changing to push OS development in that direction, though.

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                        Suggestions like this focus too much on Medium the technology and rarely if ever on Medium the community. Medium’s value is 10% a blog host and 90% community, discoverability, monetization, publication, aggregation, etc.

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                          This is a huge aspect. Having that kind of instant community is a major advantage. I used to read a lot of Medium, but have pretty much stopped since their limit of free articles is incredibly low for a month.

                          I’ve been happy with reading dev.to and we started our company engineering blog there recently. Our first post got quite a bit views and is a more focused community. It seems like a great alternative, if you’re just looking for more tech stuff instead of the large mix.

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                            Maybe host on your blog with some tech that cross-posts all of it to Medium. Maybe pulls in copies of the comments onto main article with label on username indicating they came from Medium version. What you think?

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                              That lets people continue to use Medium with additional burden on the author: the added complexity of synchronization and maintenance thereof. The sole benefit to the reader is the avoidance of a potential nagging or paywall on Medium. Using an RSS reader or something, that’s already mitigated.

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                                I was aiming to benefit the host, too, by putting the content fully in their control. If it’s in their control, there would be some added complexity.

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                            I finished the Rust Book this week, so I’m going to work on a first, small, project.

                            We have a neighborhood block party tomorrow, so we’ll be cooking and relaxing with friends. Not much other than that. Hopefully, some relaxing.

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                              Now that my son is feeling better after six days of being sick, I’m hoping to get a lot of time outside with the family.

                              I have two toilets I need to install. We had two leaking and decided to replace three. One is done and was far easier than I thought it would have been, but maybe the last two will prove that statement wrong.

                              I’ll also continue reading The Rust Book and should finish it.

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                                I’ve done some form of WFH for the last five years. The first two years it was 100% remote. The last three years I’ve gone into the office two days a week.

                                I, personally, like the more hybrid approach. When I was working all the time from home, not only did my social interactions with coworkers decline, but with people in general. I would have days at a time where the only people I would see were my wife and whoever wad working at the coffee shop.

                                Now, I get to save a ton of time and cost on commuting and also get the social aspect of being in a office. The company really has to be set up to be remote first though. This helps to solve some of the issues raised in the linked post.

                                One of the biggest things I agree with is setting a routine and keeping work work, even at home. I always recommend never having a TV on or any other major distractors. When you treat it similar to being in the office, it becomes much easier.

                                One thing that I have noticed, I tend to work longer from home. I start a bit earlier, work a bit later, and take fewer breaks. The breaks I do take are short and, like was mentioned, I tend to eat at my desk.

                                I don’t think I’d take another job that doesn’t have a remote option. It gives me so much time back to spend with my family when I don’t have to commute.

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                                  Just a note on the TV thing, I worked at ESPN and we had TVs on our desks to keep sports on if we so chose. I find it a really nice background noise system for working and still do it from time to time. Generally I prefer music, but I don’t think TV is distracting at all.

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                                    Yeah, I don’t think it’s a hard rule. Some people can drown out that stuff. It’s more about making sure you can keep your focus where it’s required and not setting yourself up for distractions. I do recommend not having something like a TV going to start with, so that someone can get into the groove of remote work. Remote work is definitely about each person finding what does and doesn’t work for them, though.

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                                  Our son woke up last night with a pretty high fever and barking cough. It turned out to be croup, so we’ll be trying to make sure he’s not too miserable.

                                  I’m working my way through the rust book, so hope to make more progress on that during down time.

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                                    My daughter had a long stint of getting croup over and over because of a weakened lung when she was born. The best thing we found amongst the billion home remedies / recommendations was to just get up with them, take them in the living room, put something calming on tv like CBeebies or Sarah and duck or something and just sit with them. The calmer they are the easier they are to distract from their cough. It’s when they get scared and riled up that it gets worse and they start having breathing difficulties, it’s almost pathological. Other than proper drugs that’s the only thing that really helped in the night for us. We had to call an ambulance twice it was so bad.

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                                      Thanks for the tips! It was definitely worse at night and in the morning. I’m hoping that it doesn’t get too bad tonight.

                                      They gave him a dose of steroids, but they were so bitter he threw them up, even in ice cream. We’re supposed to get another dose and try again soon.

                                      Sounds like y’all had a pretty rough experience with croup. Hopefully it’s been fine since then.

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                                      Cold air works amazingly well put his face in the open freezer door for a few minutes. Also super steamy hot showers and just sit in the bathroom like a sauna. Takes my daughter about 10-20 minutes to calm down but then she is good for 3-6 hours of good sleep.

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                                      Inbox, so unfortunately I’ll be looking for a replacement.

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                                        Sometimes I find this funny, especially when I continually see ads from something I just purchased off of Amazon from Amazon. Just in case I really needed multiple backups of every item I’ve ever bought.

                                        Most of the times it’s annoying. My wife and I recently had our anniversary and she knew what I had gotten her. Ads on her phone for gifts I was searching for started popping up before the date. After I gave her the gift she told me and then showed me a ad for the exact thing I bought on her phone.

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                                          It’s yet another consequence of extending that journey beyond what was necessary and I believe that it is possible to configure retargeting ads to behave in a less invasive way. In your situation, it would be even worse if your wife decided to buy the same item you’ve bought as a gift because she saw it on her phone and liked it.

                                          I think that that kind of ads will start becoming more “intelligent” as they evolve, but I don’t think that it will necessarily change for the best…

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                                            That’s strange; why would she be seeing ads for stuff you looked at? Just because y’all share an IP address by virtue of using the same wifi router at home?

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                                              Reply All has a really good podcast which is asking if Facebook is spying on us with the microphone, but in it they talk about how profiles are linked for advertising. It’s pretty interesting. In my case, as others have said, I’m sure it’s just associating us with our IP.

                                              The Reply All episode: https://www.gimletmedia.com/reply-all/109-facebook-spying

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                                                Ad networks are smart. Two profiles marked as strongly-connected (eg: usually share an IP that isn’t widely-used) is definitely enough.

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                                                  I’m not sure I’d call ad networks smart, or they wouldn’t advertise recently-bought items; but in tracking people they do exhibit a low, unpleasant cunning.