1. 13

    There should be a a project to design new motherboards for old laptops. I’ve read that most of them are just copy-paste of standard designs (this is an oversimplification) so perhaps there could be “standard modules” that can be combined easily? There are some motherboards made in a chinese thinkpad forum (51nb.com) but I don’t think the designs are open and supply is really limited.

    1. 9

      Yeah, I really like the stuff 51NB is doing. (https://geoff.greer.fm/2017/07/16/thinkpad-x62/ if people aren’t familiar) I just wish there was a way to order one without using Facebook, learning Chinese, and internationally wiring large amounts of money to someone’s personal bank account.

    1. 23

      If you want to emulate current software in the future, use virtual machines. From a headline going around lobste.rs some time ago: “Memory Safety Bugs Form 70 Percent Of Vulnerabilities” https://www.i-programmer.info/news/149-security/12538-memory-safety-bugs-form-70-percent-of-vulnerabilities.html Is it really worth it keeping broken stuff around? 🤔

      1. 1

        Philosophically I’m not sure if using virtual machines to get old programs working is any different to having to modify code to get old programs working. Sometimes you are lucky and a standard VM setup fixes the problem, other times it’s much more complicated (eg games like Midtown Madness). Sometimes you are lucky and the code changes are simple, other times they’re complex and insidious.

        “Memory Safety Bugs Form 70 Percent Of Vulnerabilities” https://www.i-programmer.info/news/149-security/12538-memory-safety-bugs-form-70-percent-of-vulnerabilities.html

        That’s looking at software from now and ignoring the past. An equally accurate headline is “90% of software ever made broken due to changes over time”.

        Is it really worth it keeping broken stuff around? 🤔

        To flip your line on its head: is it worth trying to make memory-safe (or sim.) programs if they won’t stick around?

        What’s the difference between code breaking or becoming insecure from memory-safety issues versus becoming broken or insecure with time (external changes)? Both lead to the same result.

        1. 12

          To flip your line on its head: is it worth trying to make memory-safe (or sim.) programs if they won’t stick around?

          What’s the difference between code breaking or becoming insecure from memory-safety issues versus becoming broken or insecure with time (external changes)? Both lead to the same result.

          Memory unsafe code can cause huge harm in the real world through exploitation and information theft. I’d rather my browser from 10 years ago didn’t work than my current browser getting my identity stolen or my parent’s computer infested with ransomware.

          1. 8

            To flip your line on its head: is it worth trying to make memory-safe (or sim.) programs if they won’t stick around?

            Yes, they will be memory safe while they are used.

            What’s the difference between code breaking or becoming insecure from memory-safety issues versus becoming broken or insecure with time (external changes)? Both lead to the same result.

            Memory-safe software won’t become less safe with time.

            Software is a tool to be used now foremost, I may or may not care if the firefox I use today still compiles in 50 years, but I sure care that it works and doesn’t crash today.

            1. 3

              Memory-safe software won’t become less safe with time

              Disagree. New kinds of attacks will be developed, just like they always have.

              1. 3

                They might have meant less memory-safe over time.

        1. 2

          I actually was thinking about how a language like this would like some days ago, kudos for your work.

          The standard library is fully stack based and heap allocation is strongly discouraged. ZZ has convenience tools to deal with the lack of flexibility that comes with that, such as checked tail pointers.

          I wonder how straight forward it would be to put optional borrow checking and emit destructors in C.

          1. 4

            The introduction of the term “open source software” was a deliberate effort to make this field of endeavor more understandable to newcomers and to business, which was viewed as necessary to its spread to a broader community of users. The problem with the main earlier label, “free software,” was not its political connotations, but that—to newcomers—its seeming focus on price is distracting. A term was needed that focuses on the key issue of source code and that does not immediately confuse those new to the concept. The first term that came along at the right time and fulfilled these requirements was rapidly adopted: open source.

            (emphasis mine) Wow. whether that is plain ignorance or a lie aimed to ignorant people, shame on them.

            1. 3

              Yes, this is a quite weird reason or explanation.

              Free in English means both libre and gratis (free as in „free speech“ and free as in „free beer“). And free software is both libre and gratis – where gratis is related to the license fee. I see nothing confusing here. It does not say, that you will get e.g. custom development, consulting or support for free. Just the license is free for anyone (compare it to proprietary software – this is huge difference).

              And what about the Open source? Let us read the Open Source Definition. It is the first criterion labeled „Free Redistribution“ which says:

              The license shall not restrict any party from selling or giving away the software as a component of an aggregate software distribution containing programs from several different sources. The license shall not require a royalty or other fee for such sale.

              1. 4

                Free software can be charged for. Look at all the GPL WordPress plugins that cost money but you get the source.

                1. 3

                  Or, of course, the support packages and hosted instances of apps like Discourse, Red Hat, and MariaDB.

                  1. 1

                    Free software can be charged for.

                    I should have added „once published“. Technically it is true, you can charge money for the distribution or for giving the software under the GPL license*. But once anybody gets this license from you, he can freely redistribute it. So usually you do not charge money for distribution or license but for services (consulting, support, custom development…). Theoretically you can ask money for license/distribution of an already published work, but there is low motivation to pay you and it is better to call it rather „support“ or sometimes „donation“ than a license fee.

                    *) e.g. I develop something and ask the first customer for the money – without paying he will not get anything (I am not obligated to publish or share my work) and after the payment, he will get free software licensed under GNU GPL.

                  2. 3

                    “Free Software” you have to explain once. “Open Source” you can never explain, as the current round of proprietary licenses that people are trying to call “open” shows. This wasn’t an improvement.

                  3. 5

                    I think you misread that, what she’s saying is that almost everyone who hears “Free Software” for the first time thinks it means “free” as in “no price”. She’s not claiming that this is what “Free Software” means, she’s saying that the term is confusing and ambiguous.

                    1. 5

                      Yes, that fell under the a lie aimed to ignorant people umbrella, which is what I think this is (in my honest opinion, that is. I know it may sound strong). Lie because someone not very familiar with the issue might be quick to internalize that simplistic explanation. The Free Software movement is and always was political and saying that “open source” isn’t just about businesses exploiting is a lie to make ourselves feel better. Again, I feel I have to make a disclaimer here that I’m not trying to flame.

                      1. 5

                        No problems with the flame framing, at least for me. However, what is your explanation then? What’s your view on what she describes as a problem? To my understanding, her take sounds realistic and reasonable.

                        1. 4

                          You mean my view on whether people mistake ‘free software’ for free as in beer? It’s a completely real problem, of course! But it’s not as much of a problem as “open source” is for free software. RMS on his essay Why Open Source misses the point of Free Software makes an argument on this which basically boils down to that “free software” stands for ethical responsibilities and freedoms. In my humble opinion RMS’s insistence on absolutely correct terminology hurt this effort back in those days.

                          Basically I think that sidelining or sometimes plain ignoring the commons in favor of terminology is bad. But as always these things are never black and white and you can find sense in both apparent sides of the argument. I don’t think people who regard “free software” is a bad term reject its ethics and I don’t think people who regard “open source” a bad term reject the complex issues behind software and politics. But sometimes the actual problem is that both are up for exploitation by profit seeking entities.

                          1. 3

                            The OSF regarded RMS as blockage and routed around him.

                        2. 2

                          I’m with arp242. It’s been true enough in my experience with ordinary people that I used open source to avoid it.

                          Another major problem is that many enterprise buyers believe that you get what you pay for in software. “Free Software” must be low quality. Also, many want to pay to justify the budgets for their personal fiefdoms. Those two effects mean a term like open source (or just avoiding “free”) increases paid, enterprise adoption.

                          1. 2

                            As I replied in another comment subtree, I completely agree with you, it’s just that I believe this derails the conversation about “free software” since we talk less about proprietary software making our life more difficult and more about terminology. It’s completely understandable that different people have different things in mind when talking about this!

                            1. 1

                              Again who cares what they think. If they choose to pay for inferior software that gives them less freedom they’re ironically free to do so.

                              We don’t say vim is bad because it’s hard to use for brand new users because we recognise that its benefits way way exceed its first time use costs.

                              In the same vein, we shouldn’t decide what word we use based on how people understand it on first impression when it the trade off is a word that colours the discourse we read it in the subsequent tens or hundreds of thousands of times we read it.

                              1. 1

                                People that want to increase adoption by enterprises along with odds they’ll contribute code or money to open-source projects. Some people who want to get paid working of OSS, too.

                                1. 2

                                  I’d prefer less corporate influence on free software. I don’t think any real successful businesses are operated by people so stupid that they’d dismiss free software based on the fricking name anyway.

                          2. 1

                            Who cares what people think the first time they hear the term? I’ve heard and seen open source tens of thousands of times. The first time is a distant memory.

                          3. 2

                            I think the article accounts for this pretty well. Not in the introductory paragraph as quoted, but further on:

                            those new to the term “free software” assume it is referring to the price. Oldtimers must then launch into an explanation, usually given as follows: “We mean free as in freedom, not free as in beer.”

                            I see other comments in this lobste.rs thread that have felt it necessary to repeat the “free speech vs beer” distinction to make their point, even though presumably most of us are not newcomers. So I think we can agree that this limitation of English is real, and was probably even more of a problem in 1998.

                            Other comments have pointed out Open Source has other meanings that can make it harder to explain sometimes. It’s possible to accept that and also accept Christine’s explanation for why they went with Open Source at the time. The article also touches on this:

                            while a friend in marketing and public relations felt the term “open” had been overused and abused and believed we could do better. He was right in theory; however, I didn’t have a better idea

                          1. 2

                            Is this running on top of X?

                            1. 4

                              SerenityOS has its own compositing window server.

                              https://github.com/SerenityOS/serenity/tree/master/Servers/WindowServer

                              1. 3

                                The replies mention running efifb, so I guess not (?)

                                1. 4

                                  Yeah confirmed. He is making direct calls to the frambuffer:

                                  https://github.com/jcs/serenity/blob/hosted/Libraries/LibSerenity/fb.cpp

                              1. 15

                                Word of warning: chiropractic is a pseudoscientific practice. What you want is a physiotherapist.

                                1. 3

                                  Downloads bin img lib sites src tmp torrents who www

                                  1. 1

                                    Very similar to mine, except I use tmp as downloads. What’s in the who folder?

                                    1. 5

                                      it’s my white/yellow pages. nested directories starting with last names or handles. i run a variant of research unix http://man.cat-v.org/unix_8th/7/tel to search an index generated by a cron job.

                                      1. 2

                                        Can you share this (and perhaps others) script?

                                        1. 2

                                          each final directory under who/ contains files like addr, email, tn, etc. cron runs http://plan9.stanleylieber.com/rc/nutel >$home/lib/tel to update the index. search using https://code.9front.org/hg/plan9front/file/754916eeedf1/rc/bin/tel

                                  1. 3

                                    I find it awful that developers think Github should try to “improve” git. If the author wants a change, they should bring it to the git dev mailing list where the actual git development happens.

                                    1. 0

                                      Do you find it awful that car tire manufacturers try to improve tire traction? Or do you think that’s the responsibility of “the road people?”

                                      It would break the analogy for me to suggest that there’s a mailing list for roads, but there’s trade shows or standards organizations or whatever.

                                      I think you are in serious need of a history lesson, and I have a pretty “serious” writing style so I should say upfront that I mean this in the least annoying, most gentle way, and I’m pretty sincere in a meaningful way but not that serious in an angry way, and I always mess this up so I just need to be very clear, and there’s an imaginary huge spoonful of sugar to make the medicine go down included, and, should you disagree, you may take it with a grain of salt (to your taste).

                                      Fossil is not “some project” by “some developer” – it is THE weird rebel VCS (TM)(R)(C) backed by the full powers of freaky FOSS ideologies that have been falling all over themselves (omnidirectionally) to hack new stuff since the beginning of computer time when von Neumann made the 32-bit array from giant tubes and this one whacko named Nils Barricelli immediately started making “life” in the form of cellular automata (that Stephen Wolfram pretends he invented) on punchcards.

                                      OK, that’s exaggeration – but I’m “serious,” there was Subversion, then there was Git and Mercurial. There’s also Fossil. On the side. Not “off on the side somewhere,” but in the center of being off to the side. If there were a rave of obscure VCSes then Fossil would be the DJ. (I’m joking but I’m totally serious.)

                                      Git has literally been the same for the last twenty years. All the variously (non-)exciting “UNIX simplicity” manifestos kind of break down when you consider carefully the issues entangled within git that have remained unresolved for developers generally because the ubiquity of the most important technologies is an impediment to further progress. This is not unique to git, but it is true about git.

                                      That simplicity cannot be improved upon while no consensus regarding improvement exists within GitHub. Why? Because they are the material being that represents the ubiquity of the technology of git in the market. If there’s no money behind it, it can’t happen. And there isn’t money behind Fossil. Which is the best place to improve not just “the ecosystem” but the actual technology of VCS itself. It is about the ideas and not about the profit or the users.

                                      That is the reason that the creator of Fossil was invited.

                                      That is the reason that he was invited, even though everyone knew he would be a contrarian.

                                      I submit that you are 100% correct when you say: “If the author wants a change, they should bring it to the git dev mailing list where the actual git development happens.”

                                      I further submit that this has already happened, but you just weren’t around for it.

                                      Finally, I helpfully suggest that it’s not “awful” to have the kinds of feelings that you, in the innocence and naivete of youth and scholarship, also helpfully looking out for the community, called awful.

                                      In fact, it is not awful, it is itself the community looking out for itself. But that just can’t happen properly until you have the knowledge that allows you to fully consider, in its genuine context, why the developer of Fossil is not the same as some complaining “developers.”

                                      I know it’s a pain in the butt to be unexpectedly in the position of having someone take a stand against you, but really I am taking a stand against the world, pointing out the little red line between Us and Them, and hoping you will recognize that you already have friends on our side. Literally our side includes the members of the exact mailing list that you think (thought? :D) the guy “being awful” should have contacted. I don’t blame you for having this opinion whatsoever – your mind is just probably running the wrong VCS :) maybe rebase that opinion

                                      also check this out it is so cool https://fossil-scm.org/home/doc/trunk/www/index.wiki

                                      1. 6

                                        Thank you for the reply.

                                        Fossil is not “some project” by “some developer”

                                        I didn’t comment on any of this. I think you picked up some kind of dismissal and irony from my comment.

                                        Because they are the material being that represents the ubiquity of the technology of git in the market. If there’s no money behind it, it can’t happen

                                        While it’s true that capital pretty much controls linux and friends, the git community is independent.

                                        I further submit that this has already happened, but you just weren’t around for it. This is not relevant because the problem is the author tries to make github pressure git, instead of communicating with the developers.

                                        I should not reply to the way you express yourself because it is irrelevant to the discussion and your points (it’s an ad hominem) but since you comment on it I will tell you my opinion: saying you have a certain kind of tone doesn’t mean others should tolerate it; it’s not an excuse. Mature discourse is not like this. You can share your opinions without being mildly condescending.

                                        Also, thank you for the other comment about my site :)

                                        1. 0

                                          > Thank you for the reply.

                                          You’re welcome, and I owe you a continual debt for your continued engagement with a lesser being of my particular variety. I’m not trying to troll, I’m absolutely not trying to excuse myself, and I should point out the meaning of the root of apology. (Unrelated: website in link is maintained by a single individual! Incredible. What an example of cathedral-style development…)

                                          > the way [I] express [myself]

                                          Technology is my hobby, not my profession. So sorry if I’m not what you expected. And I’m sincerely curious. I’m not joking around when it comes to knowledge, opinions, and exacting detail. I am really hungry to know. I just don’t know how to communicate with developers very well (it is NOT easy) and I have a terrible proclivity for prolixity. I’d rather read your replies, although I will accept your downvotes.

                                          > dismissal and irony (yours in my opinion, but only in my mind in your opinion!)

                                          So what?

                                          (Note: I’m asking. I’m not asking “rhetorically.” I’m asking because I want to know.)

                                          > capital controls linux

                                          I’ve taken heat before for having been invited here by one of those sympathizers with intellectual radicals, a self-avowed hypertext crank, and possibly stupidly I don’t blame myself for the fact that everyone seems to think I share all his opinions – we’re strangers. I just wanted to be a part of the best forum in cyberspace, so I asked him.

                                          Anyway, does capital really control Linux, or is that just a lame explanation of the fact that nobody “controls Linux,” and everybody thinks that capital is a big deal? When I said:

                                          > no money behind it

                                          … what I meant was, “No people with deep pockets supporting the one crazy Fossil developer, directly.” Are you really replying to me? Am I misinterpreting you by thinking that we’re not really talking about the same thing? Now we’re talking about different communities, and I am lost. When I said:

                                          > the community (which I said twice)

                                          … I meant two things. The first time, I was using the term in a sentence about you. I meant the community that you (in my opinion) were looking out for by defining “the author” as one of the developers who, when thinking about improving things, thinks about things that you “find awful” (that’s OK – it is your opinion!) – things like saying GitHub should improve the technology it has used to get itself acquired by Microsoft for $7.5 x 1,000,000,000,000.00 USD (woah! crazy talk!). IMPROVEMENTS LIKE FUNDING FOSSIL IN THE FLAMING NAME OF HADES. Sorry. That was autocorrect, not me. I’m just gonna leave it there. Hopefully it doesn’t render poorly on mobile.

                                          The second time, I meant you, me, and everyone invited here by people invited by jcs. Because this is a community. Communities are places where developers go to read news and be annoyed by crazy old men and find romance. Communities are a huge problem. Communities are where keyboards interface with chairs. And this chair-to-keyboard interface started short-circuiting explosively upon learning that such a noble and talented person as yourself (I really do like your terminal emulator!) was capable of being deceived by the complacency of the powerful. I think it is popular to believe, on this very technically advanced forum, that everything sucks. And this is a terrible opinion. We, you and I, do not suck. That’s like, one of the categorical axiomatic booleans of writing software that doesn’t become an unimprovable Legacy pile of bloatware. No? One of the categorical axiomatic booleans of doing stuff that we can pretend is great until it really is great.

                                          And it is also the basic postulate of my entire philosophy on free software, which in my opinion is the only exciting software, because, to quote a really old guy who probably nobody here knows about or is interested in, credo quia absurdum. It really is the irrational man that is the source of all progress, because if only logical actions are taken then any mind which is not omniscient will remain in a local minima of cost when greater cost savings are possible. I believe that wisdom adheres to contradiction like flies to fly paper, and I literally think that is why everyone around here thinks that all software sucks, because it is a forum filled with talent.

                                          Anyway, it is apparent (to me, not apparent to some kind of objective mind that would literally be physically impossible to create because the model becomes the map eventually) that you think the only community that could possibly matter in this discussion is the git community. I would like to know why that is. I know it’s an annoying and tiresome question. I literally don’t know the answer and I do very much seek to know. I think it’s the wrong answer, and the only – literally the only – reason I can give you is this: “Fossil seems cool to me.”

                                          Look, I don’t have a classical education in this stuff. I know there’s such a thing as naming files for version control with dates and symbols that’s all neat and tidy called “SemVer,” and that mentioning this is a great way to convince your boss for a few extra weeks of what is in reality more free time to read Lobste.rs while you “convert to the new system” by running a shell script in the background, and I can honestly say my knowledge about VCSes stops somewhere around there.

                                          I also know every time somebody posts about GitHub a bunch of hot-blooded FOSS fanatics come out of the air like Rumpelstiltskin (mixed with poor, finally-defeated, possibly-woman-hating-but-probably-not-Hitler RMS) to complain that they hate the system of “stars.” But that is not the best evidence in favor of GitHub, and also not the best evidence in favor of Fossil.

                                          So, apparently, you think there are two communities. One is Linux and friends, and the other is the git one.

                                          IN WHAT WAY COULD THESE POSSIBLY BE DISTINCT? o.0

                                          How is anybody supposed to know what community is where – we are talking to each other, and that means you and I are in communion (in a very boring sense) with one another. We are online together and that is what this whole stupid project of sitting in front of a useless glowing rectangle is about. I mean I love mine and don’t know why, I guess because there are people on the other end… but I am sooo curious to know – what are your real thoughts?

                                          You can’t hide behind a statement that something very not mysterious is “awful” by saying that you weren’t commenting on whether when you said “developers” you meant people distinct from the author of the thing this is all about.

                                          Sorry I don’t have a literal technical argument. I hope you can follow the thread of my thought. Sorry if the words are too complicated I gather you’re from the Continent. (I mean that I’ll rephrase it if needed!) I am genuinely curious. I can accept downvotes for bad style. (I’m trying to improve it.) (Although who doesn’t want to be sardonic, flippant, tedious, and … wait for it … unwelcome?)

                                          (JK >.< but only about the unwelcomeness – i love the other qualities too much!)

                                          And SUCK == FALSE!

                                          1. 1

                                            Oh and sorry I have l’espirit d’escalier but I also read…

                                            this

                                            this

                                            this

                                            and this

                                            … approximately 2.5 years ago after I found out about Fossil. I find out about things every week, but that was one of the good ones. I’ve been meaning to get back to it, and learn about all this mumbo-jumbo on my own, but you know, VCS is like waaaay down on the to-do list, and 1/($7.5*10^9)th less far down on the to-read list. (We can also start saying “One Githubth” if that’s easier than “One seventy-five-hundred-millionths.”)

                                            My questions are real. Maybe there’s not any right answer. I can accept that. But I just don’t get it. Why not use the better tool? Why not fund its development? Why ignore the guy after inviting him to the thing? You know what I mean?

                                          2. 0

                                            > the problem is the author tries to make github pressure git, instead of communicating with the developers

                                            Can you say more

                                          3. 3

                                            Git has literally been the same for the last twenty years

                                            Git is only 14 years old :)

                                            1. 2

                                              I heard Linus carried the entire source code in his brain exactly as it exists today for exactly 6 years… 14+6=20

                                              JK im an idiot thanks myfreeweb

                                              1. 1

                                                by the way

                                                fossil is “only” 14-2 years old! just found out

                                              2. 3

                                                Finally, I helpfully suggest that it’s not “awful” to have the kinds of feelings that you, in the innocence and naivete of youth and scholarship, also helpfully looking out for the community, called awful.

                                                Your comment was overall well-put and an interesting perspective, but I feel like this was patronizing and unnecessary. It’s the kind of thing that derails from what could be a useful, continuing discussion. :)

                                                1. 1

                                                  i appreciate you pointing this out, i will try to not do that

                                                2. 1

                                                  also if you were using fossil it wouldn’t be such a pain in the butt to rebase

                                                3. 0

                                                  also your website abt meli is beautiful

                                                1. 1

                                                  @epilys@chaos.social

                                                  I post various (retro) computing+aesthetics stuff but also a lot about my project https://meli.delivery which might be not of interest to you.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    I can’t believe fonts still get released with mainly basic latin support. Languages that don’t use the latin script have a major disability here.

                                                    1. 7

                                                      Well it is a font for programming (done mainly in latin script), by designers who speak and write languages that mainly use latin script, for a userbase that too prioritises latin script. I don’t think it’s ridiculous that basic latin support was the MVP.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        I know people that use non-English languages with latin scripts use their language in code (because not every code is for international view). I think that programming is done mainly in latin script because latin script is all that’s available mainly. Besides, even if you do your programming in latin your data may be any script in Unicode.

                                                        1. 4

                                                          I believe MS is all in on i18n, but these things take time. It’s not as if there isn’t literally hundreds of other fonts available in the meantime, many of them that cover more than latin scripts.

                                                      2. 4

                                                        It’s a work in progress, the font isn’t final. The linked post mentions a roadmap, which after some clicking around can be found here:

                                                        https://github.com/microsoft/cascadia-code/wiki/Roadmap

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Indeed. I wonder if there’s a good reason not to merge wide covering fonts like Unifont with WIP fonts until more unicode blocks are implemented.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Doesn’t MS have a “replacement font” functionality, where missing glyphs are filled by a backup font?

                                                      1. 2

                                                        How do you render mdoc in gitea? I host my stuff on gitea and would like to show my docs like that as well.

                                                        I currently convert them with mandoc to html when I build the project’s website with Hakyll

                                                        1. 6

                                                          I have this in app.ini:

                                                          [markup.mandoc]
                                                          ENABLED = true
                                                          FILE_EXTENSIONS = .1,.2,.3,.4,.5,.6,.7,.8,.9
                                                          RENDER_COMMAND = /usr/local/libexec/gitea-mandoc
                                                          

                                                          where gitea-mandoc is a script that pipes mandoc through ttpre (just because gitea seems to do weird things to mandoc’s HTML output)

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Interesting, thank you!

                                                            mandoc’s html output is a bit weird to be honest.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              It mimics the troff typesetter’s way of separating paragraphs.

                                                              More recents versions uses that encapsulate the paragraphs. https://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article;sid=20190108193936

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Thank you very much for the link. I will check the new versions out!

                                                        1. 26

                                                          It’s bloody disappointing that we’ve reached the stage where this is necessary.

                                                          1. 11

                                                            We should also standardize a DNT for face scanners, like an invisible ink tattoo on your forehead. Then we can say “at least we did what we could” when bad actors do not respect it.

                                                            1. -1

                                                              why assume that all programs performing opt-out analytics are inherently bad actors?

                                                              1. 3

                                                                There is no such assumption in my comment.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            That is a pretty handy tool you got there. I didn’t knew about the calendar utility. Now we need a good way to “accept” meetings so the organizer knows wether we will attend or not. I don’t know if there is a standard way to do so, eg. by replying with the same ICS file and adding a tag of some sort.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              I suspect (but I should verify) that might just be about replying with a new ICalendar that carries the same UID field and updated information. Perhaps a couple of experiments could help :)

                                                              AFAIK Claws Mail should be able to properly answer, so checking what claws does should give the answer.

                                                              I honestly never reply :P

                                                              1. 1

                                                                I am suspecting something like this, but never took the time to properly check it. I’ll look into this again this week!

                                                                How is calendar as a day to day meeting manager? I tried to use calcurse for some time, but it is unusable without colors, and I find the UI to be quite complex to use.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  If you find out something interesting on the topic, please share :)

                                                                  About calendar(1), I simply get a local mail by cron. Since calendar(1) is invoked from my unprivileged user’s crontab, the notification ends up in the user’s local mailbox. You need to have some local mail service running (e.g. postfix, exim, opensmtp…). Don’t forget to make it enabled at boot time, that’s my only recommendation. Then I’m quite sure that it is by default that Mutt points at /var/spool/mail/$USER, where your local mail will end up.

                                                                  I’m satisfied by the experience so far.

                                                                  But it is absolutely minimal, not a UI for sure. Just a plain text email

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                                                                    I’ve added mailcap support recently to meli and I’m happy I put your script in my mailcap file and it worked out of the box :).

                                                                    PS: I haven’t pushed it yet, the next tagged release is going to be somewhat voluminous!

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                                                                rfc5545 doesn’t define anything other than RSVP Expectation parameter that let’s the receiver know an rsvp e-mail reply is expected.

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                                                                Collapse hypothesizing induces much anxiety to me. Not only do I depend on chronic disease medication produced by numbered high tech factories around the globe, but I also find it difficult to be motivated and functional in my privileged state in this society. What hope is there in such a scenario?

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                                                                  Depends on your attachment to life. If you want to live as long as possible at all costs, well, this scenario is negative. If you measure life by other means, there’s lot of hope to be found in such a scenario. While the lack of material goods will for sure produce endless suffering, the survivors will end up with freedoms that don’t exist now, especially the freedom to build a world with a future, a luxury that now we don’t have. And I’m saying this as a person with mild but chronic conditions that would make me very unfit to a scenario with an unreliable supply chain.

                                                                  In general I don’t think you should reason about possible scenarios according to how they make you feel. Or better, you shouldn’t run away from negative emotions. Learning to deal with these emotions and imagining alternative worlds might bring you unexpected emotional well being and achieve a more healthy relationship with the certainty of your death.

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                                                                  I use Hakyll. It’s written in Haskell and is completely programmable. It’s actually more of a framework for writing static site generators. That said, there are example codebases that you can get started with. It supports all your desires.

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                                                                    I use Hakyll, too, but it’s complete overkill for me. And I’m not deep enough in Haskell any more to do much development on it, so I’ve been considering moving to something else.

                                                                    I still endorse Hakyll, fwiw, but its strength lies in either: 1- leveraging your existing Haskell knowledge, and/or 2- generating sites that are far more complex than most personal sites/blogs.

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                                                                      I still endorse Hakyll, fwiw, but its strength lies in either: 1- leveraging your existing Haskell knowledge, and/or 2- generating sites that are far more complex than most personal sites/blogs

                                                                      It’s also fun to spend more time programming your blog than writing blog posts.

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                                                                        i use hakyll and i’ve used it to also teach myself odd bits of haskell.

                                                                        i like how extensible it is, and i’ve occasionally used it to add various bits and pieces

                                                                        the main downside w.r.t. github is that you have to commit all the generated artefacts; which is definitely a shame.

                                                                        i’ve not done too much funky stuff with it; but on my companies website i’ve used it to build some (very simple) features, such as lists and specialised rss views, next/previous blog post buttons, etc.

                                                                        it’s not the most elegant code; but gets the job done.

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                                                                          Late to the party, but you might be interested in rib.

                                                                          Why? Because by using rib, you will automatically learn Shake which it is built on top of. Compared to Hakyll, rib is relatively simple to use.

                                                                          Disclaimer: I’m the author. :-)

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                                                                          hakyll here as well

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                                                                            Great to see you’re blogging (again), Pavlo!

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                                                                              Hakyll too. It’s simple if you only want to convert text into HTML, however, if you want something more advanced be prepared that you might spend more time figuring out how to implement this instead of writing.

                                                                              I’m also using supplementary python scripts and relying on external means (e.g. jupiter/emacs) to generate HTML too, I shared my setup here

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                                                                              The major concern is most email providers doesn’t like sending tons of mail in a short period. And the latency for this method is much higher than plain tcp.

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                                                                                The latency for Push IMAP? I don’t think I’ve used any public server that supported it.

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                                                                                Little question:

                                                                                the runtime of a “typical” server application may regress by at most 10%

                                                                                This means regress to the current GC, correct?

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                                                                                  Yes, I’m missing a benchmark here though – 10% worse is reasonable when going for smaller pauses, although I don’t really see where they might lose that much performance in their specific case of adding a mark-sweep collector in addition to the semi-space collected nursery.

                                                                                  (Though I’m also not really seeing how the exercise as a whole puts them on a path toward lower latency.)

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                                                                                  bb is a classic, and while I would have been sad had you clobbered the name by mistake, I’m sadder that you intentionally did it :(. A name like bbtop might have worked too.

                                                                                  For those who don’t know the demo, here’s a video with sound, and the demo page is on sourceforge.

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                                                                                    bb is a classic

                                                                                    It’s great.

                                                                                    A name like bbtop might have worked too.

                                                                                    But bb is shorter and more convenient :/ I had to compromise. Plus who watches bb more than once (in a while)?

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                                                                                    Warrant canaries seem to be useless:

                                                                                    • they’re built on a legally questionable premise

                                                                                    • there’s no way to monitor them in bulk because no standard format exists

                                                                                    • providers update them with meaningless frequency and discontinue them without any acknowledgement

                                                                                    and the worst point: all those things train us to ignore them. If you accept the premise we’d be treating Talos as compromised, right now. That’s what a warrant canary expiring means. It doesn’t mean “ask (the federal agent) on Twitter if they’re going to sign a new canary”, it means “you now must assume this entity has been compromised because they took the time to build a system to tell you that and look they’re now using it”.

                                                                                    Sadly it seems warrant canaries are a fail open system.

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                                                                                      They’re still somewhat useful. When riseup “forgot” to update theirs, everyone knew it was the FBI and bailed ship.

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                                                                                        Why isn’t everyone assuming the same thing is happening here?

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                                                                                          Occam’s Razor, I suppose (without having any knowledge on the matter).

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                                                                                            When Riseup’s canary expired HN was saying the same things:

                                                                                            https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=13007234

                                                                                            The top comments from a techno wonk audience that would be likely to understand canaries were dismissive of the situation, even when Riseup posted suggestive tweets and stalled when asked about the canary.

                                                                                            If Occam’s Razor points you to thinking that the expiry of a canary is anything other than signal, the channel is nothing but noise.

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                                                                                              Anybody who knows the state of infosec understands that they ought to be paranoid.

                                                                                              Actually being paranoid is exhausting, so when it comes to the brass tacks, few people actually go to the hassle of being truly paranoid.

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                                                                                                Yeah. If someone goes through the effort of having a canary and it expires there’s no reason not to believe something happened without evidence.

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                                                                                            Agree. What good alternatives are there for riseup?

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                                                                                            Yes, it’s only my best guess about the company that says they aren’t. I can’t prove they’re not until they update it, which they haven’t so far.

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                                                                                              A machine-readable format would be pretty easy to create since there’s hardly any bikeshedding fodder (a true/false flag and a signature). I guess the real limiting factors are the other ones, and the first one is the biggest.

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                                                                                                You also have to include a not-created-before proof (not just a timestamp). This is canonically done by mentioning a newspaper headline, although you could also use lottery numbers and sports scores. Or hey, most recent Bitcoin hash, why not.

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                                                                                                  https://opentimestamps.org is good for this I believe.

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                                                                                              I just searched for this today and I wish I had it years earlier :) Finally my eyes can handle gdb a bit better.

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                                                                                                You’re so right. Just started using this. Finally some developer ergonomics.