Threads for erkattak

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    “Microsoft uses the Plan 9 filesystem to enable interoperability between Windows and Linux files” was far down on my list of plausible sentences.

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      Same, but it is a brilliant idea, IMHO.

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        A somewhat relevant comment on the use of 9P I came across after using WSL 2 to access files outside of the VM https://github.com/microsoft/WSL/issues/4197#issuecomment-604592340

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          Yeah, I don’t think any of us saw that coming.

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            Windows had a built-in WebDAV client for a long time. Way too long a time.

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          From the crawler’s download page

          If you have any problems installing or running software then please report them in forum.

          The forum link is a list of bugs, the most recent of which was added in December of 2018. I don’t see this issue reported in the way they’re asking. Perhaps that would be a first step before calling them incompetent?

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            The useragent MJ12Bot uses links to this page. I cannot find a link to the forum anywhere on that page, but it does give an email address to contact them.

            But I did get another email reply from them—the person who handles questions about the MJ12Bot is out of the office for the day.

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            I guess this makes sense, but the same could be said for JavaScript? When you load a script, doesn’t it affect the whole page? (Technically, the global is actually window?) And a script loaded via src is usually for more than one page, right? So should JavaScript be loaded via link ref tags too?

            Actually, the more I think about it the weirder link is for css. The other link types, next page, rss, lang=fr, etc. connect this page to others, but don’t change it. Browsers don’t generally load link targets. But a css link does get loaded and it affects this page. It’s not really a link at all.

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              The semantics of <script src> are such that if you have

              <div id=a></div>
              <script src=...></script>
              <div id=b></div>
              

              Then the script can see ‘a’ but it cannot see ‘b’. So it’s evaluated exactly at the point it’s pulled in.

              Further, the script can actually document.write and insert more DOM/script before ‘b’.

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                I’m not that clear on the timeline, but was this formalized before the event handlers for page ready were in place? This rationale seems like it could have made sense at the time but is now a bit of a dead metaphor.

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                  Formalized is a strong word to associate with Javascript’s history. I don’t know whether document events were present in the original implementation, but when JS was originally added to Netscape they definitely had no idea what paradigms would become dominant years later. At the time, it made perfect sense to run a script inline that would output raw HTML into the document, because that’s how everything else worked.

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                Yeah honestly I didn’t find the response very enlightening.

                To me, it still seems like a mistake. Every time I write an HTML document (and I write by hand fairl often), I notice this inconsistency and have to copy from previous documents to maintain it.

                What else is the link tag used for? I’ve only ever used it for CSS.

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                  Also used to get used for “here’s the RSS feed for the blog that you’re currently reading”. There’s a bunch of early Web 2.0 stuff that used various <link> tags in page <head>s for stuff like pingbacks.

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                    <link>: The External Resource Link element

                    tl;dr - icons and fonts, commonly

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                    The only difference I can recall is document.write, which writes right after its <script> tag, and I remember that it was quite popular in “Web 1.0”, even for “client-side templating” for static sites.

                    With async attribute, designed especially to overcome document.write problems, <script> finally loses its location-dependency.

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                        I think the new logo ( “moz://a”) is pretty awesome!

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                          I wasn’t a fan at first, but it has grown on me now that I see it with a little more context

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                          I’ve wondered why people are so enamored with podcasts for a while. There’s a few I listen to sometimes, but then I don’t for a long time. Maybe if you have a long commute? The problem I have is they are hard to skim and it seems a rather slow way to convey information. How do I refer back to it later to verify something? Etc., etc.

                          But reading this article, something clicked. Ads in podcasts are very basic. You can skip them. The interface of your chosen player is your chosen player, not some wild ass web framework designed to make reading difficult. Despite inherent limitations of the audio format, there’s very little opportunity for publishers to “add value” here. Users like that.

                          1. 9

                            I think a lot of it is commute time. I listen to podcasts/talks at 1.3-1.8x speed while doing mindless chores, and never otherwise. They fill empty air, people seem to have become allergic to silence the last decade or two.

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                              I love silence! But I’d rather listen to a podcast than to those around me chatting about nothing, or heavy machinery workers outside and so on, and so on.

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                              The problem I have is they are hard to skim and it seems a rather slow way to convey information.

                              If your goal is information consumption, podcasts are a terrible format. Fortunately, they’re a great format for a number of other things! Here are the types of podcasts I’ve tried listening to and my success with them:

                              Interviews - The podcast format shines brightest here. No time limits and no agendas means you get rawer, more interesting interviews than you’ll get in any other medium. I listen to almost every episode of The Tim Ferriss Show and The James Altucher Show. Both fantastic interviewers (albeit with very different styles) and both get some amazing guests (names you know, names you forgot, and very interesting people with little to no following outside of their niche). Recent standouts are Jamie Foxx, Cal Fussman, and Derek Sivers on Ferriss' podcast, and Jesse Itzler and Derek Sivers on Altucher’s.

                              Programming - Very hit or miss. Mostly miss, generally a waste of time. I’ve tried a ton and none have delivered any value to me regularly. I catch an occasional episode if a topic really interests me and the people on it are people I care to listen to.

                              Tech News - Just poor entertainment, not informative. I haven’t listened to any in a long time and am better off for it.

                              Entertainment - Banter podcasts, usually with 2-4 hosts. I listen to these just because they put a smile on my face. I got into the GiantBomb podcasts a few years ago, at a time when I wasn’t playing any video games, to listen to their “game of the year deliberation podcasts” for reasons that I’ve now forgotten. I ended up just enjoying the banter and dynamics of the hosts so much that I’ve been listening to the podcast ever since (and the other podcasts that their site puts out).

                              Bonus: Audiobooks - Some books don’t translate well to audio, and some people can’t focus on (usually) a single narrator speaking for hours on end, but my preferred way to consume books for a few years now has been in this format. It’s like books, but you can read them when you’re washing dishes or folding laundry or eating a meal!

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                                The problem I have is they are hard to skim and it seems a rather slow way to convey information.

                                Is that so different than a poorly written article? Bad grammar, silly formatting, poor vocabulary, inline ads and other nonsense can all make an article difficult to read and almost impossible to skim.

                                I avoid reading poor articles just as I stop listening to podcasts that don’t understand their audience or otherwise don’t consider my time valuable.

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                                  I agree completely regarding ability to refer back to content. Pretty much the only podcast I listen to is Friday Night Comedy from BBC Radio 4. That works; and a lot of radio shows could work too, but as a means of conveying reference technical information I don’t think it’s a great medium. (Although better than radio, given you can rewind if you need to…)

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                                    I listen to podcasts (typically humorous ones) when I’m gaming solo / non-competitively. I wouldn’t otherwise enjoy podcasts, because they’re (usually) not enough to focus on. This way they just take up some spare cycles when I’m doing other things.

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                                      It depends on the podcast and the player, but a lot of the better produced tech ones I listen to keep “show notes”, which are generally either links or topic/product/people names in a chronological order, that can be included in the RSS feed and parsed for display alongside the audio.

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                                        Podcasts are a great way to learn/get entertained while

                                        • Commuting
                                        • Walking to places
                                        • Doing housework
                                        • When you’re too tired to read but are still able to process information by listening
                                        • Background chat while working (I can’t do it, but I’ve heard from friends)

                                        They have all the limitations you mention, that’s why they’re not a great medium to replace blogs. If you look at the use cases, they’re basically radio 2.0.

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                                        Looks interesting. Is there a walkthrough of the platform anywhere?

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                                          Forgive me for pointing someone to the README, but github.com/oddnetworks/oddworks has an overview of the content server. We have some more detailed guides in the works.