1. 5

    Do you also have a otf or ttf version available? I am working on a project where this font could be really usefull :)

    1. 2

      It’s a bitmap.

      1. 6

        You can wrap bitmap fonts in a TTF, so the actual bitmap is used at specific point sizes, and the other sizes are naively scaled. I don’t know, myself, how to do this, but I’ve seen it done.

        1. 3

          The tools Tilman made for Terminus TTF might be useful.

    1. 1

      Has anybody experience using riemann (http://riemann.io/) in production?

      1. 9

        I’ve been considering taking on a project in this line for a while but haven’t had the need for it recently - I’ve got a Kodak Pakon, which is a bulk film scanner that drug stores used back in the days of 1 hour photo development. Unfortunately the driver is Windows XP only, and I’d really love to use it without running a VM.

        1. 1

          Can I ask where you got that device? Is the quality of the scans good?

          1. 3

            I got mine on the second hand market from someone who got it from whichever drug store liquidated it - Walgreens, I think? - and yeah! It scans at 6MP, which is a little low by modern standards but meets all my requirements from film, and it has really excellent color reproduction. The real killer feature is that it can scan an entire roll of 35mm film without any interaction. You see them on ebay pretty frequently, there’s a couple different versions but the most common is the F135 that I have.

          2. 1

            The lack of drivers is exactly what has kept me away from acquiring a Pakon, hoping someone will write a FOSS driver of some kind.

          1. 3

            I am currently building an ARM cluster of my own, though for slightly different purposes than self-hosting. If you want more hardware to expend your research with, I would suggest you take a look at http://wordpress.supersafesafe.com/clusterboard (that URL though..). It is a bit of a gamble, though a cheap one, as the packaging and shipping was some of the worst I have ever seen.

            The hope was getting the nodes to work from ramdisk only and netboot alpine linux, but struggling with uboot for the time being.

            1. 1

              What is your cluster for? I am toying with building a cluster myself with zfs but I have not found a good solution on how to attach a bunch of harddrives to the sbcs. Mostly they have a USB ports to attach drives but I neither have money nor time to test this approach.

              1. 2

                a few projects, mainly fuzzing for vulnerabilities. The perhaps more interesting experiment is “volatile single-use, throwaway” thin clients, be it android apps or mapping browser “tabs” on my desktop to short-lived “one device, one page, kill and reboot on close” chrome instances.

            1. 13

              I may as well join in.

              I’ve had a light conversation with SirCmpwn before and he doesn’t care for macros either, which I find foolhardy, but I’ll focus on just this article.

              The inertia of “what I’m used to” comes to a violent stop when they try to use Go. People affected by this frustration interpret it as a problem with Go, that Go is missing some crucial feature - such as generics. But this lack of features is itself a feature, not a bug.

              I use a number of wildly different languages, including Common Lisp, APL, and most recently Ada; each of these languages is lacking things the other has, but it also vastly more suited to other tasks than the rest. I’ve never used Go. Unlike these three languages I’ve mentioned, which have perfectly good reasons for lacking whatever it is they lack, Go very often has poor reasons or perhaps even no reasons, although I don’t skulk around the mailing lists or whatnot.

              For a good example, take a look at this; it’s my understanding Go lacked a proper mechanism for determining time and many people critiqued this, but daddy Google didn’t care until someone important was hit by it. This is a good example of the problems caused by a language that is not only uncustomizable by the users, but is designed by people who don’t care and won’t care. Unless you’re someone, Google doesn’t care about what you think and the language certainly doesn’t, considering it is designed at every point to take away programmer choice.

              Go strikes me as one of the most conservative programming languages available today. It’s small and simple, and every detail is carefully thought out. There are very few dusty corners of Go - in large part because Go has fewer corners in general than most programming languages.

              This isn’t equivalent to a language that is good for writing programs in. Ofttimes, a lack of edge cases in the world of the language doesn’t correspond to a lack of edge cases in real use. Take a look at Ada for a counterexample; the rules may not have a nice technical explanation, but the corresponding real world explanation is very simple, because it’s usually to prevent some manner of error.

              I feel that this applies to generics. In my opinion, generics are an imperfect solution to an unsolved problem in computer science.

              Dynamic typing as in Lisp is one solution. Ada has a nice generic system, but again, Ada was designed not for theoretical prettiness, but to actually make large systems easier to write without flaws, so generics were of course there because otherwise you get people copying and pasting code, which makes maintenance and everything else harder because you can’t tell if one of the copies is wrong or otherwise changed easily or quickly.

              I used to sneer at the Go maintainers alongside everyone else whenever they’d punt on generics. With so many people pining after it, why haven’t they seen sense yet? How can they know better than all of these people?

              Have you ever considered these people don’t know better than anyone else. Have you considered that Go is just an extension of the UNIX and C religion and people like Rob Pike are just playing their part as a priest over scared people who don’t know any better and want a panacea and a movement to join?

              I don’t think programming languages should compete with each other in an attempt to become the perfect solution to every problem. This is impossible, and attempts will just create a messy kitchen sink that solves every problem poorly.

              I’d prefer to think that’s common sense. APL and its family is the clear choice for array problems, but will fall flat against many other types of problems. What is Go actually good for? I find that poor languages, typically ALGOL clones, tend to differentiate themselves on purpose rather than anything intrinsic. You see this with Perl being a ’‘scripting’’ language, Ruby being for ’‘web services’’, Python being ’‘glue code’’, and, what, Go being for ’‘scalable programs with a focus on internet-connected services’’? The key detail to observe is these languages are all rather the same and, utterly lacking originality, attempt to dominate in a particular usage, because that’s the only way they can really be differentiated.

              If you disagree with this, compare Perl to PHP to Go to Python and compare those differences to those between comparing Common Lisp to Forth to APL to Ada.

              If you’re fighting Go’s lack of generics trying to do something Your Way, you might want to step back and consider a solution to the problem which embraces the limitations of Go instead. Often when I do this the new solution is a much better design.

              I felt something similar when I was writing an Ada program and, wanting to use the package system properly, was forced to structure my program in a different, albeit natural and better way. Tell me if there’s a document that lists all of Go’s design decisions and why they were taken, or am I only going to find the typical UNIX and C response of ’‘We know better. It’s better this way. Don’t consider other ways. Our way is the one true way.’’?

              So it’s my hope that Go will hold out until the right solution presents itself, and it hasn’t yet. Rushing into it to appease the unwashed masses is a bad idea.

              Go was designed for the ’‘unwashed masses’’, I mean those ’‘not capable of understanding a brilliant language, but we want to use them to build good software. So, the language that we give them has to be easy for them to understand and easy to adopt.’’, straight from Rob Pike’s mouth. Go is designed to use programmers as unintelligent implementing machines, which is why it’s so opinionated. Its opinions have little or nothing to do with good programs and apparently everything to do with preventing the damage any single fool they want to use can cause or, worse, prevent a new hire who isn’t a fool from writing a good program that makes them more valuable than their peers and harder to fire. There’s no macros in Go, only the same thing, everywhere, no matter how poorly suited it is to the problem. If everyone writes Go the same, it’s easy to fire and interchange employees without friction.

              I could keep going on about how Go is just a continuation of UNIX, C, and so also Plan9, UTF-8, and whatever else those malign idiots create, but I believe this gets the point across well enough. The only ’‘philosophy’’ these things espouse is that the computer isn’t a tool for leveraging the mind.

              1. 10

                ’‘We know better. It’s better this way. Don’t consider other ways. Our way is the one true way.’’

                Hilariously, a pro-Go commenter just said to me that Go is an anti-“we know better” language.

                Go is just an extension of the UNIX and C religion

                And yet it goes against everything in the actual modern Unix world. Go likes static linking (because Linux distros), has custom syscall wrappers, a custom assembler (!), custom calling convention and weird stack setup… As a result, calling non-Go code requires either overhead (cgo) or ridiculous hacks (c2goasm), LD_PRELOAD hooks don’t work, and porting the main official Go implementation to a new OS/CPUarch combo is utter hell.

                1. 9

                  Go being for ’‘scalable programs with a focus on internet-connected services’’?

                  Two comments: the two wins go has over other languages is

                  • (1) build/link - that its build system is fast, and it produces reasonably small static binaries, suitable for deploying into containers. This requires a fair bit of fiddling in other languages and with fairly large binaries in the outcome. Not infeasible, but certainly more than plug and play.

                  • (2) it aligns with the sensibilities of python and ruby programmers in general, but in a typed manner, so improved maintainability with a fairly simple semantic.

                  I’m not a go fan, but these are key good things for go.

                  Rather write in something like Haskell or Common Lisp, but ce la vie…

                  1. 9

                    I had you until the last paragraph. What the heck do you find bad in UTF-8?

                    1. 1

                      I don’t want that to turn into its own discussion, but I have reasons aplenty and I’ll list all those that currently come to mind.

                      Firstly, I have my own thoughts about machine text. I find the goal of Unicode, being able to have all languages in one character set, to be fundamentally misguided. It’s similar to the general UNIX attitude: ’‘Should we have the ability to support multiple standards and have rich facilities for doing so transparently? No, we should adopt a single, universal standard and solve the problem that way. The universal standard is the one true way and you’re holding back progress if you disagree!’’.

                      Operating systems can support multiple newline conventions, as VMS did, and it would be trivial to have a format for incorporating multiple character sets into a single document without issue, but that’s not what is done. Instead, Unicode is forced and there are multiple Unicode encodings. Unicode is also filled with dead languages, emojis, and graphics-building characters, the latter being there, I think in part, because GUIs under UNIX are so poor and so turning the character set into the GUI toolkit is such an easy ’‘solution’’. I’m fully aware the other reasoning is likely to encompass graphics from other character sets, however.

                      UTF-8 is a large, variable-length character set that can have parsing errors, which I find unacceptable. It’s backwards compatible with ASCII, which I also dislike, but at least ASCII has the advantage of being small. UTF-8 takes pains to avoid containing the zeroeth character, so as to avoid offending C’s delicate sensibilities, since C is similarly designed to not accommodate anything and expect everything to accommodate it instead. It is as if Ken Thompson thought: ’‘I haven’t done enough damage.’’

                      UTF-8 disadvantages other languages, such as Japanese and Chinese (This isn’t even mentioning the Eastern character controversy.), by being larger than a single-minded encoding, leading several such peoples to prefer their own custom encodings, anyway. You can only add UTF-8 support to a program transparently in trivial cases, as anything more such as a text editor will break in subtle ways.

                      There’s also that Unicode makes the distinction between characters, graphemes, and other such things that turn a simple problem into an unmanageable one. I use Common Lisp implementations that support Unicode characters, but don’t actually support Unicode, because there are so many combining characters and other such things that have no meaning to Common Lisp and so can’t be implemented ’‘correctly’’, as they would violate the semantics of the language.

                      There are other reasons I can list, but this is sufficient.

                      1. 10

                        multiple standards and have rich facilities for doing so transparently

                        Well, looks like getting everyone to agree on a way of selecting encodings turned out to be way harder than getting everyone to agree on one encoding :)

                        And sure — we have Content-Type: what/ever;charset=MyAwesomeEncoding on the web, we can have file formats with specified encodings inside, but there’s nothing you can do about something as fundamental as plain text files. You could never get everyone to agree to use something like extended FS attributes for this, and to make it work when moving a file across filesystems… that’s just not happening.

                        format for incorporating multiple character sets into a single document without issue

                        Again, some format that software has to agree on. Plain, zero-metadata text fields and files are a thing that’s not going away, as much as you’d like it to.

                        UTF-8 disadvantages other languages, such as Japanese and Chinese

                        They often include ASCII pieces like HTML tags, brand names, whatever; you should use an actual compressor if you care about the size so much; and every character in these languages conveys more information than a Latin/Greek/Cyrillic/etc character anyway.

                        1. 7

                          It seems like you don’t actually know what UTF-8 is. UTF-8 is not Unicode. Rob Pike did not design Unicode, or have anything really do to with Unicode. Those guys designed UTF-8, which is an encoding for Unicode, and it’s an encoding that has many wonderful properties.

                          One of those properties is backwards compatibility. It’s compatible with ASCII. You ‘dislike’ this, apparently. Why? It’s one of the most important features of UTF-8! It’s why UTF-8 has been adopted into network protocols and operating systems seamlessly and UTF-16 hasn’t.

                          UTF-8 doesn’t ‘disadvantage’ other languages either. It doesn’t ‘disadvantage’ Japanese or Chinese at all. Most web pages with Japanese and Chinese text are smaller in UTF-8 than UTF-16, despite the actual Japanese and Chinese text taking up 3 bytes instead of 2, because all the other bytes (metadata, tags, etc.) are smaller.

                          The fact is that anyone that says that Unicode ‘makes the distinction between characters, graphemes, and other such things that turn a simple problem into an unmanageable one’ doesn’t know what they’re talking about. Unicode did not create those problems, Unicode simply represents that problem. That problem exists regardless of the encoding. Code units, code points, characters, graphemes.. they’re all inherently different things.

                          Unicode does not have any GUI characters.

                          1. 2

                            Could you maybe elaborate the following quote?

                            UTF-8 disadvantages other languages, such as Japanese and Chinese (This isn’t even mentioning the Eastern character controversy.)

                            1. 6

                              I reckon it refers to the controversial Han unification, which was in China’s favour.

                            2. 1

                              It’s similar to the general UNIX attitude: ’‘Should we have the ability to support multiple standards and have rich facilities for doing so transparently? No, we should adopt a single, universal standard and solve the problem that way. The universal standard is the one true way and you’re holding back progress if you disagree!’’.

                              What precisely does UNIX force you into? Are you sure this isn’t also the LISP attitude as well? For example, Lispers usually sternly glare over the interwebs if you dare you use anything but EMACS and SLIME.

                              Operating systems can support multiple newline conventions, as VMS did, and it would be trivial to have a format for incorporating multiple character sets into a single document without issue, but that’s not what is done.

                              You’re confusing multiple newlines in a single character encoding with multiple newlines across character encodings. You say that it would be trivial to have multiple character sets in a single document, but you clearly have not tried your hand at the problem, or you would know it to be false.

                              Give me twenty individual sequences of bytes that are all ‘invalid’ in twenty different character encodings, and then give me 200 individual sequences of bytes that are all ‘invalid’ in 200 different character encodings. Otherwise there is ambiguity on how to interpret the text and what encoding is used.

                              This problem can be seen by the people who are trying to revamp the c2 wiki. Reworking it has stalled because there are around 150 files with multiple different character encodings, and they cannot be identified, separated, and unified by the machine.

                              Unicode is also filled with dead languages, […]

                              Right, because Unicode is supposed to be a superset of all encodings. The fact it supports languages that are not used anymore is a feature, not a bug. It is important to people working in linguistics (you know, that field outside of computer science…) that any computer encoding format has a method of displaying the text that they are working with. This is important to language archival efforts.

                              UTF-8 disadvantages other languages, such as Japanese and Chinese (This isn’t even mentioning the Eastern character controversy.

                              This is outright false, but someone else has already mentioned that.

                              I use Common Lisp implementations that support Unicode characters, but don’t actually support Unicode, because there are so many combining characters and other such things that have no meaning to Common Lisp and so can’t be implemented ’‘correctly’’, as they would violate the semantics of the language.

                              Unicode allows language implementations to disallow some sets of characters for ‘security’ reasons: http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr31/

                              This entire rant remined me of Steve Yegge’s post “Lisp is not an acceptable Lisp”:

                              But what’s wrong with Common Lisp? Do I really need to say it? Every single non-standard extension, everything not in the spec, is “wrong” with Common Lisp. This includes any support for threads, filesystem access, processes and IPC, operating system interoperability, a GUI, Unicode, and the long list of other features missing from the latest hyperspec.

                              Effectively, everything that can’t be solved from within Lisp is a target. Lisp is really powerful, sure, but some features can only be effective if they’re handled by the implementation.

                          2. -4

                            I could keep going on about how Go is just a continuation of UNIX, C, and so also Plan9, UTF-8, and whatever else those malign idiots create

                            The difference is that Plan9, UNIX, C, UTF-8 and Go are all absolutely wonderful and have all had far more positive effect on the world than anything you will ever create. That’s not because they got lucky, it’s because they were designed by people that actually understand what makes things successful.

                            1. -5

                              He’s just a butthurt Lisper who’s mad his elegant, beautiful language is ignored by people who actually get stuff done. UNIX-haters and that.

                          1. 6

                            I still don’t really understand urbit. Could a kind person explain me the project like i’m five?

                            1. 9

                              Based on reading the above comments, there’s a reason for that. I don’t understand it either, and it would seem that its author didn’t optimize for accessibility :)

                              1. 5

                                This is the best explanation: https://urbit.org/primer/

                                1. 4

                                  See the new primer they just released. The video in it gives an overview. https://urbit.org/primer/

                                1. 7

                                  Nice, but it’s unclear to me whether the algorithm it uses is better than simple Markov Chains for entertainment value.

                                  1. 1

                                    Recently I actually did a project like this. You can find it here: https://tofu.wtf/buzzwords

                                    1. 1

                                      It does seem a bit less repetitive, but that’s probably just the large amount of data it’s been fed.

                                      // My favorite generators are the Conservative Book Title Generator and the Startup Generator :D

                                    1. 1

                                      The link doesn’t seem to work

                                      1. 2
                                      1. 2

                                        Does anyone have any information on what actually happened? It seems to have been all scrubbed. Hard to have feelings about it without knowing. Although violations of the CoC should of course be enforced.

                                        1. 6

                                          Here is a screenshot of some of the scrubbed issue: https://twitter.com/maybekatz/status/899760806551666690

                                          1. 6

                                            Thanks a lot. “anti-Code-of-Conduct article” linked is The Neurodiversity Case for Free Speech. I support CoC, and I also support this article. I don’t see how the article can be construed as anti-CoC. (It’s also written by Geoffrey Miller, a scientist I highly respect.)

                                            1. 6

                                              As a perceived leader in the project, it can be difficult for outsiders to separate Rod’s opinions from that [sic] of the project.

                                              This is a pretty cancerous attitude. Rod can’t control what you perceive. Without coming right out and saying it, this reads to me as The Community Shall Dictate/Censor Rod’s Personal Views. What a bunch of crap. If I perceive The Darn Kat to be a ‘perceived leader’, can I tell her what to tweet?

                                              1. 5

                                                I think the problem manifest itself differently in that case: To me it seems that Rod has a rather important role in the Node project and at one point in time he accepted the projects CoC. As the perceived leader of the project you cannot decide to apply the CoC sometimes and sometimes not.

                                                Please bear in mind that nobody in this thread knows the full context of this problem.

                                            2. 5

                                              The guy, Rod, posted an article that was critical of codes of conduct

                                            1. 2

                                              Wow, that is crazy. Do you know who is behind this?

                                              1. 2

                                                ICANN says the registry agreement is with a company named Top Level Spectrum. The state of Delaware says they are a corporation registered 2011-12-21. CrunchBase says they are owned by Jay Westerdal, who owned DomainTools (formerly whois.sc) and NameIntelligence.

                                              1. 3

                                                Did some linux distro already changed to wayland by default?

                                                1. 4

                                                  Yes, Fedora 25 uses Wayland by default although it falls back to X11 for certain display chipsets (some NVidia chipsets for one).

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I’m running gnome on arch linux with wayland which became the default this year.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I’m thinking on moving from gnome ti i3/sway. How did you do the step and why?

                                                    1. 6

                                                      If you’re moving from GNOME to i3, you may be interested in reading about running gnome-session with i3 so you still have access to GNOME features like auto-mounting removable devices, media keys, screen-locking, etc.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Your reply touches something that I don’t really understand because I always used gnome. So for me it’s hard to tell where gnome ends and linux starts. Can you explain quickly why I want to run a gnom-session inside i3?

                                                        1. 5

                                                          It’s not to run gnome-session inside i3, it’s to replace GNOME’s window manager with i3 in a GNOME session.
                                                          GNOME is much more than just a window manager, it’s a Desktop Environment. It provides a suite of softwares to manage your desktop. i3, along with most other dynamic/tiling window managers are just window managers.
                                                          Meaning: they will only provide you with a means of managing X windows. On their own, they will not provide a dock, menu/status bar, application launcher, notification system, etc. However, some (like i3) will actually have ready made solutions to replace some these components, and if one doesn’t come directly from the project, you just build up your suite of components yourself :)

                                                          It’s very much a more modular approach: GNOME is kinda like a flat-packed Desktop Environment, whereas if you go down the dynamic/tiling window manager route, it’ll be more like building your own thing with LEGO - which can be really fun, and beneficial in some ways.

                                                          I think Screwtape’s suggestion to try out i3 inside of a GNOME session is so that you could try i3 for what it is: a window manager - but still have the comfort of GNOME (the menu/status bar, notification system, application launcher, workspace manager).

                                                          1. 2

                                                            I think he already did: to get the listed features that gnome implements.

                                                            That said, there are other implementations too.

                                                        2. 1

                                                          i3 was pretty easy to get used to, but I had to spend an hour or so practicing after reading https://i3wm.org/docs/userguide.html

                                                        1. 25

                                                          This is the office I built into the top corner of the roofline in my loft; the machine itself is old-ish (most parts from 2011) but still works great and can play Overwatch at 60 FPS, which is all I care about :) Monitor spins between portrait and landscape, although portrait mode only works in Linux. http://static.haldean.org/battlestation.jpg

                                                          awesome3, tmux, PragmataPro (+ Konsole to get the ligatures), vim. http://static.haldean.org/screenshot.png

                                                          1. 4

                                                            tenkeyless mechkeyboard, gaming mouse, portrait display, case with side open, oversized clamp to hang headphone.

                                                            Wow you are all over the place

                                                            1. 7

                                                              Balance is achieved through tension :)

                                                            2. 1

                                                              That is a nice keyboard. What model is it?

                                                              1. 5

                                                                It’s this one. I split my time between that and a Kinesis Advantage; the Kinesis is currently at my desk at work.

                                                              2. 1

                                                                Wow, I really like that portrait monitor.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                I’m not affiliated with Ericsson nor Erlang Solutions, but for those wanting to give OTP a try and have yet to, it’s super easy to get installing via https://www.erlang-solutions.com/resources/download.html

                                                                Here’s a hello world example you can use. Type erl in your console to get the Erlang shell. Then:

                                                                1> S = self().
                                                                2> A = fun() -> S ! hello_world end.
                                                                3> spawn(A).
                                                                4> flush().
                                                                5> q().
                                                                

                                                                This will showcase processes (which enable concurrency) and message passing to whet your appetite.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Also I really enjoy elixir, the ruby like language built on top of the erlang vm. I recently built a raspeberry pi connected device with it.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  On my android with firefox i get the following results:

                                                                  Within our dataset of several hundred thousand visitors, only one in 200652.0 browsers have the same fingerprint as yours.

                                                                  Currently, we estimate that your browser has a fingerprint that conveys 17.61 bits of identifying information.

                                                                  How do you guys stop people tracking you on the internet?

                                                                  1. 5

                                                                    How do you guys stop people tracking you on the internet?

                                                                    Tor browser (note that their fingerprint doesn’t include IP address), or you don’t. Welcome to the modern Web.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      So, the only way to protect from fingerprinting is Tor? There must be another lighter-weight solution out there…

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Let us know, if you find something :-)

                                                                    2. 5
                                                                      • uBlock Origin: general purpose adblocker
                                                                      • uMatrix: block everything 3rd party by default, enable on a site-basis. Also enables toggling of User agent spoofing, Referer spoofing and Strict HTTPS.
                                                                      • Privacy Settings: has some nice buttons for toggling features depending on mood; using it to block things like geolocation, battery API etc.
                                                                      • Cookie AutoDelete: remove all cookies, unless whitelisted. I whitelist a few pages that I use enough that it’d be a bother to having to log in on every visit.

                                                                      And now also CanvasBlocker

                                                                      I often pop open a clean Chromium (using chromium --temp-profile) or create a new Firefox profile if I’m visiting sites that for some reason don’t work/don’t want to fiddle with uMatrix settings to get it to work.

                                                                      And of course, Tor Browser for an easy way to browse sites that I really don’t want to know me. And in the extreme that I’d want to be even more secure I’d make a Raspberry Pi dropbox with a wifi dongle and set it to run a VPN (or just SSH) as a tor hidden service and drop it with a battery near a coffee shop/McDonalds/library. …or use my Ubiquiti NanoStation to connect to an open wifi a few hundred meters away…

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Having so many extension that inspect and intercept all network requests is unfortunately really bad for browser performance (and the JS/C++ context switches for everyone of those really add up). I recommend picking one of those blockers and figuring out how to make a restrictive superset.

                                                                        Alternatively you could blocklist/nullroute things via /etc/hosts or somewhere else deeper in the network stack. Gives you free anti-tracking in your other applications too.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Thanks for the advice – I’m well aware of the cost, but in day-to-day use it’s not really noticeable.

                                                                          Haven’t gotten around to setting up hosts files on my PCs/the gateway but I should find time to do that soon…

                                                                        2. 1

                                                                          Thanks for Privacy Settings addon. I fiddled with about:config for some time, but the addon is much more convenient.

                                                                        3. 1

                                                                          NoScript for Firefox on Android https://noscript.net/nsa/

                                                                        1. 28

                                                                          Other facts include:

                                                                          I don’t care about how fast your app runs in electron. The Space Shuttle goes fast too, but the amount of energy that goes into launching isn’t trivial.

                                                                          1. 3

                                                                            IMHO the article is a bit meagre on the facts. Thanks for pointing them out. I also really like the part about the space shuttle, I will use it in future discussion about electron :)

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              The native analogy to this isn’t recompiling a program using the native GUI, it’s recompiling the native GUI libraries.

                                                                              My understanding is that Qt/Gnome are both pretty tough to get up and running.

                                                                              That said, it would be extra awesome to make this stuff easier. Namely not having to have a copy of Electron for every app would be great. Where’s the JVM for Electron?

                                                                              1. 8

                                                                                My understanding is that Qt/Gnome are both pretty tough to get up and running.

                                                                                Nope. Gnome is a mess, but Qt is beautifully organized and very easy to clone and build.

                                                                                1. 0

                                                                                  My limited experience trying to release a new version of a Qt code base says otherwise. Moving an app from one version of Qt to another is non trivial IME.

                                                                                  1. 2

                                                                                    I have done it. Coincidentally, it is also a gooey client for postgres (https://github.com/pgXplorer/pgXplorer). Moved it from 4.x to 5.x. It was relatively ‘easy’. From 5.x to 5.y involved little to no change in certain versions.

                                                                                    My opinion is that the Qt documentation is excellent overall but internals can send you on a wild goose chase. For example textfield or a dropdown in a table header (lel)

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      You’re comparing apples to oranges, though.

                                                                                      Initial setup and day to day use is fundamentally different than upgrading a large code base to an incompatible new major version.

                                                                                      Electron hasn’t been around long enough to even make that comparison. Even with Qt, there have only been two major non-backwards compatible releases in the past 16 years.

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                                                                                        I don’t doubt it. I’m hardly an expert, my one set of experiences around this was trying to recompile the Zeal open source doc set viewer (like Dash but for Linux) for a newer Qt version, because if you built it from source on modern Linux versions it wouldn’t display properly.

                                                                                        It was un-fun :)

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                                                                                What window manager are you using? I have been running linux in all of its flavors for a few years now. There the wm landscape seems to be clear to me with gnome etc and ie3 ect. Can you also use those on openBSD?

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                                                                                  I use i3 on openbsd. It works nicely for me with minimal configuration.

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                                                                                    Yes you can.

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                                                                                      Yes, we have packages for Gnome 3, KDE 3.5, Xfce 4.12, i3, etc.

                                                                                      I personally use ratpoison with some hacks.

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                                                                                        OpenBSD has Gnome 3.22, KDE 4.14, i3, xfce4, twm, fvwm, and my personal preference of awesome to mention just 7 window managers.

                                                                                        edit: there are window managers in base, but they tend to be light weight, ports have a good selection of other window managers…

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                                                                                        I am extremely amused by all the Americans and Brits crying all over the internet, looking for conspirations, when this is truly the essence of democracy. The majority decides about minorities. And this time, you were a minority. Truth is, that world is full of stupid people and you did a bad job convincing them to join your side. Deal with it.

                                                                                        For me, it is funny, because my country has huge history with this shit. Our current president is hillbilly hated literally by every intellectual there is. But no one thinks that democracy was „hijacked“. It is just simply result of giving voting right to everyone, when the majority of people is just stupid and doesn’t care for your vision of the world.

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                                                                                          I didn’t get much out of this news story despite some fun conspiracies around Robert Mercer.

                                                                                          I would like to see more stories that somehow make people realize that they are not as informed as they might think they are, though. I think one problem we have, and I grew up in the golden age of trusting the press I think, is that everyone thinks they are informed but clearly don’t agree on basic facts. That’s the real threat to democracy, IMO.

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                                                                                            Thank you for your comment, i got really upset reading the article but your reply made me realise that the connections mentioned in the article are not as crystal clear as they seem.

                                                                                            One thing that is really frightening me, and that was not given ample space in the article, is that targeted propaganda IMHO removes the dimishing effect of the shared, public consumption of said propaganda. It creates another manufactured bubble specially for you.

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                                                                                            In defense of the crying Americans and the “essence of democracy”, the candidate picked by the majority of us didn’t win.

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                                                                                              The EC is hardly a new development. If it’s not democratic, it was never democratic. Not a great example of the demise of democracy if the system hasn’t changed.

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                                                                                                The Electoral College isn’t democratic and is intentionally not supposed to be. That was the point of my comment: the original comment said the “majority decides about minorities” and “the majority of people is…”, when in fact neither of those were true in the American case, so the comment is inapplicable to what happened in the American presidential election.

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                                                                                              As the poster of this link, I feel rather confused on why the reaction is as harsh as it is. I would like to know more. Would you like to explain this situation to me?

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                                                                                                Lobste.rs doesn’t do politics; you can see this from -12 downvotes off-topic and hence there is no #politics tag. Occasionally i write #politics in the comments for posts that should be tagged politics ;-) The reaction is strong because people don’t want to see politics here, or use this venue to talk about politics (or anything else OT, e.g. business). Understandable as it’s a tech news aggregator with a mission to be !HN

                                                                                                Personally, I think this creates an audience where it would be extremely valuable to discuss certain topics, but I’m wary of pushing any personal opinion on this group, and respectful of the downvote.

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                                                                                              “Personal cloud” seems a bit oxymoronic. It’s just a box a NAS.

                                                                                              But it seems cool. Anyone running storage at home should just know that everything is fine right up until the point that nothing is fine. I run a home storage machine and use ZFS which protects me from some pain but it still requires thought and care to make it such that when a drive goes bad, not all your data is lost.

                                                                                              Any idea if something like this could run Plex? It’s a bit under-powered in the RAM department. One of the benefits of having my own storage machine is having my own Netflix for what few things I don’t stream.

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                                                                                                I’m currently running plex on odroid-c1. Most of the time it runs flawlessly just sometimes plex complains that realtime conversion of some of the movies is not supported.