1. 4

    lib/pq: An early Postgres frontrunner in the Go ecosystem. It was good for its time and place, but has fallen behind, and is no longer actively maintained.

    Latest release was 6 days ago: https://github.com/lib/pq/releases/tag/v1.10.3, so it seems that it is still maintained.

    1. 5

      The README explicitly says:

      This package is currently in maintenance mode. For users that require new features or reliable resolution of reported bugs, we recommend using pgx which is under active development.

      1. 8

        “In maintenance mode” does not mean that it is not actively maintained.

        1. 4

          I would argue that the statement “Maintainers usually do not resolve reported issues” does mean it’s not actively maintained.

          That being said, this is probably getting into the semantics of what “actively maintained” means. For me, it means there’s active development and that reported issues will be resolved, neither of which seem to be the case for lib/pq at the moment.

    1. 1

      If you want to forward jist one applic5 you can do so by adding a line to your docker run command. I have a example here: https://raymii.org/s/tutorials/Running_gnash_on_Ubuntu_20.04.html

      1. 7

        Wait, is applic5 a typo? Or is it shorthand like i18n? If shorthand, did you just make it up? It seems like such an arbitrary spot to split it. Also why not just use “app”.

        Sorry for the 21 questions, but I just woke up and it seemed so funny and out of place to me.

        1. 2

          That was a typo indeed. On mobile, so probably didn’t notice the autocorrect failure. I do understand your confusion with i18n yes.

          1. 1

            I have never ever seen anyone use that word, so probably something @raymii made up :).

        1. 1

          I thought Gnome 40 was already considered stable. Why are new distro releases still shipping 3.x?

          1. 4

            Because Gnome 40 was released after Debian 11 features freeze.

            1. 3

              That’s right: bullseye soft freeze was February, GNOME 40 released in March.

              IMHO (as a Debian developer) we should have delayed the soft freeze and got 40 into bullseye, if there was sufficient confidence that 40 really was stable enough (we’d have had to evaluate that before 40 actually shipped)

              1. 1

                Does gnome not make it into back ports?

              2. 1

                FWIW (not much, I know!), I think that this is exactly the right approach to take. There’s always one more update, one more feature. If you are aiming for stable releases (and I think Debian should), then you gotta draw a line in the sand at some point.

                I love that Debian is run so well. I only wish more projects had a similar, healthy respect for stability.

            1. 2

              OP mentions GPU issues and that he was hoping avoid dealing with a proprietary driver. I wonder if he tried the proprietary driver in the end, though and if the issues went away.

              1. 4

                Likely his issues would be alleviated by running a newer (non-LTS) kernel with the appropriate drivers mainlined.

                I have never had a good experience with the AMD proprietary drivers.

                1. 2

                  I always buy one-generation-older-than-current graphic cards for this reason. If something doesn’t work out of the box I’ll just return it for something else.

                  1. 2

                    That was my original plan, but I got greedy at the end and went the for a newer GPU from the current generation. I just assumed that with all the praise amdgpu was getting, this wouldn’t matter as it did in the past.

                  2. 1

                    I’ve been trying newer kernels over the course of several months, but they didn’t help either. Probably they fixed the problem by now, though.

                  3. 2

                    I tried the proprietary drivers as well, but they didn’t help. From what I gathered they are pretty close to the the FOSS drivers (both are developed by AMD themselves), so it’s not very likely that you’d get different results https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/AMDGPU#AMDGPU_PRO

                  1. 2

                    I use atool almost daily. It’s part of the reasons I can’t remember the correct syntax of tar/unzip/7z…

                      1. 18

                        because i wanted to

                        1. 1

                          Reason enough for me.

                        2. 14

                          Just because we can.

                          1. 9

                            Why not?

                          1. 10

                            This is great. I’ve been building it from source for a few weeks now and using the neovim-lspconfig settings for learning rust and developing in go.

                            1. 4

                              Me too, after reading the recently discussed post on 0.5 nightly! It was always bugging me how I was using coc.nvim with pure Vim (but didn’t want to switch just to use a 3rd party plugin). Also running Node wasn’t ideal. There is a Twitch release stream right now by the way!

                              1. 3

                                I skimmed through the record video and the tree-sitter demo is really cool.

                            1. 9

                              The trackpads are now too large.

                              I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been in the middle of typing something when the trackpad decides that I really wanted the cursor to be a few lines up from where I just was. It’s a large and infuriating number.

                              1. 1

                                Yes, I had to disable Tap to Click functionality so that only real clicks are registered.

                                1. 5

                                  Tap to Click is disabled by default, right?

                              1. 4

                                So, when and why we were attempted to migrate away from mardiadb? And to what database system?

                                1. 14

                                  pushcx can provide a better summary but tl;dr when the site was moved off of prgmr, it was decided to use DO’s hosted MySQL offering. Unfortunately, it was slow and missing query optimizations.

                                1. 2

                                  I’m not sure what is the advantage of Chezmoi over more powerful tools like Ansible, Saltstack. I take a look at the Quick Start guide and not really convinced.

                                  1. 7

                                    I think they are intended for different use cases. Chezmoi is about setting the user config, by copying the config files to the right places under $HOME, while Ansible and Saltstack are for configuring the whole OS.

                                    This is a matter of a personal preference, but one should never “program” in YAML to configure anything, even the OS :)

                                    1. 3

                                      Exactly this. Chezmoi is aimed at a much smaller problem than “whole system” configuration. In fact, I use ansible to set up my Chezmoi initial configuration when bringing up a new computer, so for me at least the two are complementary.

                                    1. 3

                                      I was not aware that you could run MS SQL server on Linux. There is a guide of how to install on various distros here, https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/linux/sql-server-linux-setup?view=sql-server-ver15

                                      1. 10

                                        SQL Server on Linux is a pretty exciting beast. It uses Drawbridge, which is Windows built as a library OS with a thin host layer, so it’s really a Win32 binary running on a really small Windows NT kernel, on top of Linux.

                                          1. 1

                                            I was aware about the PowerShell, I have read it in several places, but I haven’t heard about the SQL Server. I suppose I might have missed it or Microsoft does not advertise it as other products I suppose.

                                          2. 4

                                            This comes in super handy in dev because we can do things like snapshot a container with a copy of sql server inside, which is shockingly faster and more reliable than using MS’ own tools to backup and restore copies of data and schema.

                                          1. 30

                                            However, there’s one advantage to Gnome - it’s a good indicator of where the future of Linux lies.

                                            I feel like it’s been a good 15 years since people have made the argument that desktop usability has any bearing on the future of adoption. UI/UX anti-patterns are pretty rampant in modern UIs - be they touch or pointer-based. Of all the things preventing “Linux on the desktop” from reaching critical mass, I would put Gnome’s despotic approach to minimalism and various idiosyncrasies way down on the list.

                                            I remember hot takes declaring web apps a dumb fad because users would reject their painful UI and would not tolerate radically different UX across multiple different applications. In today’s world this is the norm: even native apps on mobile devices style their own widgets, use their own layouts and only loosely follow platform usability guidelines or various trendy design patterns.

                                            1. 9

                                              I agree with you.

                                              A curious fact though, Ubuntu with gnome 2 was probably the closest Linux ever was to more widespread adoption as a desktop solution.

                                              The whole gnome 3 fiasco pretty much dictated the peak. Linux mint became the most popular distribution thanks to their commitment to a classic desktop paradigm. But let’s be honest, Linux mint never had the momentum Ubuntu had.

                                              Now it all belongs to the past. More and more people are happy with a phone as their primary or even only computing device. And the phones even offer a desktop mode of you connect them to a screen. The future of desktop computer might well, and sadly, be in android and iOS.

                                              1. 6

                                                Linux mint became the most popular distribution thanks to their commitment to a classic desktop paradigm.

                                                When did that happened? It is hard to believe that Linux Mint was more popular than Ubuntu at any time.

                                                1. 2

                                                  Looks like I was wrong in that it never overtook Ubuntu, however the effect of moving away from gnome2 is quite clear: https://trends.google.com/trends/explore?date=all&q=linux%20mint,ubuntu%20linux

                                                  The news story I remember from a decade ago is this one: https://www.extremetech.com/computing/104581-linux-mint-the-new-ubuntu

                                              2. 4

                                                UI/UX anti-patterns are pretty rampant in modern UIs - be they touch or pointer-based.

                                                At what point are these anti-patterns and at what point are these desire paths? I’m legitimately asking because I’m not very aware of the pedagogy of UI/UX and what basis practitioners have to say “anti-pattern” in these situations. TFA was just a rant, there wasn’t anything approaching empiricism there.

                                                1. 2

                                                  The masses won’t chose what works best for them, but rather what looks flashier. Something can be desired by the author of a UI because of popularity incentive. Which in its turn is driven by the looks. It can still be an anti pattern.

                                                  1. 4

                                                    I’d still appreciate concrete examples of anti-patterns (and no, dark patterns that are designed to trick consumers don’t count).

                                                    1. 6

                                                      The fact that UI elements lack a consistent look/feel between applications. The conventional wisdom in the 90s and early 00s was that this was massively off-putting to users. It’s the entire reason why Apple (and later) Gnome created formal Human Interface Guidelines (http://interface.free.fr/Archives/Apple_HIGuidelines.pdf and https://developer.gnome.org/hig/stable/). Modern apps will loosely follow design trends, but nothing resembling the level of formalization of a HIG-like document.

                                                      I also don’t fully understand why you feel dark patterns shouldn’t count?

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Thanks for taking the time to answer!

                                                        I also don’t fully understand why you feel dark patterns shouldn’t count?

                                                        Because they are real antipatterns, designed to trick the user into taking actions contrary to their intentions.

                                                        If you had to page through 3 screens of ads to save a file,that would be a dark antipattern - it would leverage something that you have to do as a user and make is profitable for someone else.

                                                        I use Windows and Mac daily and the built-in system don’t have that stuff. If Gnome does I’d be surprised.

                                                      2. 4

                                                        A few general anti-patterns: hamburger menus, low-contrast text, buttons that don’t look like buttons.

                                                        Specific anti-patterns mentioned in the article: unnecessarily large amounts of mouse movement for common flows (click upper-left corner to open activities view, move mouse to screen bottom to select an application). Hidden/missing buttons for common actions (minimize/maximize). Missing/removed features that are intuitive, ergonomic, and useful (desktop icons, files still doesn’t let you right-click > create files.). Missing visual hints for focus (“no distinction between foreground and background windows”).

                                                        1. 1

                                                          Thanks for taking the time to answer, I appreciate it.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Specific anti-patterns mentioned in the article: unnecessarily large amounts of mouse movement for common flows (click upper-left corner to open activities view, move mouse to screen bottom to select an application). Hidden/missing buttons for common actions (minimize/maximize). Missing/removed features that are intuitive, ergonomic, and useful (desktop icons, files still doesn’t let you right-click > create files.). Missing visual hints for focus (“no distinction between foreground and background windows”).

                                                            I’m curious, are you aware of any tools in regular, current-use that follow these guidelines? Like enterprise apps or something.

                                                            1. 3

                                                              I can only give you a few examples, but these are ones that I’ve thought of off the top of my head.

                                                              Microsoft Outlook 2016 places several navigation panes on the left side in close proximity to each other - after selecting a folder, you can select an email it in with only a small mouse motion. Windows 10 places the start menu icon right next to the icons in the taskbar, and several more useful buttons (power, profile settings) in the lower-left-hand corner of the start menu - after you click the start button, you have several useful actions available to you with a relatively small mouse movement.

                                                              The Windows context menu allows you to make a new file very easily.

                                                              Windows has desktop icons - which you can also completely remove if you don’t like.

                                                              Windows windows have hinting to help you determine which is focused - albeit not as much as ideal.

                                                              Are either of these programs perfect? Quite the opposite - I think that they’re bad. But they do get these things right, and I would much prefer the Windows interface to the GNOME 40 interface (although Openbox and StumpWM would be better than either).

                                                  1. 1

                                                    I use jove for many of the same things, and I’d like to add another advantage: It allows full-speed typing. Emacs, for example, does not. You have to start it, wait for a window to become ready, then resume typing.

                                                    Editors like jove, nano and vi accept commands from the moment you’re done invoking them, even before the kernel has started paging the editor’s executable into memory.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      I only have to open Emacs once every time I restart my machine, so it is non-problem for me.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        I’ve not used Jove. Is it Emacs without the lisp, like mg or zile? I use mg on OpenBSD sometimes, but forget whether I’m in Emacs and get frustrated when things don’t work.

                                                        I can’t say I’ve ever experienced the problem you describe, but I work quite slowly. I just timed opening Emacs from cold, and it takes just over a second. It takes less than half a second after that, even without using emacsclient. That’s still fifty times slower than nano, true, but it seems to grab keypresses from the get go as well - every time I started typing as soon as I pressed enter and all the text showed up.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          Yes. Jonathan (whose last name I’ve forgotten) wanted an emacs and wrote one, in C. I tested a couple of curses-based editors with emacs keybindings and found jove best, and it’s stayed with me for 25 years. Maybe mg or zile are better nowadays. I do use emacs itself for when I’m working in the editor, but jove’s my to-go when I’m working on the command line.

                                                          I know that a lot of people either never work on the command line and/or can’t type quickly. But for those of us who can type quickly and do work with command lines, being able to type at the editor without any pause is valuable.

                                                          When I looked for jove, emacs itself would either accept keypresses at once or require you to wait for it to open an X11 window depending on…. I think there were two conditions, but I can’t remember. It’s been so long.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Did jove use to be “joe” (Joe’s Own Editor)? I think it used the slang library, like the slrn newsreader.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              You might be thinking of JED there - that one definitely used slang. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JED_(text_editor)

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Correct, someone named Joseph created JOE:

                                                                https://joe-editor.sourceforge.io/

                                                              2. 2

                                                                No, that’s a completely different editor written around the same time. Someone named Joe wrote one, someone named Jonathan wrote the other.

                                                              3. 1

                                                                Oh I see, I forgot that Emacs had an X11 version. I always run Emacs in the terminal so don’t need to wait for a window to spawn. I’m glad you’re happy with Jove!

                                                          1. 45

                                                            Secretly? /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ is the opposite of secret.

                                                            1. 12

                                                              Just a click baiting title, there is nothing secret about it.

                                                              1. 10

                                                                I wanted to comment exactly this. Don’t you see it in the output of apt update?

                                                                Also, raspbian is not the only linux distribution one can run on RaspberryPI. At top of my head: Debian, Fedora and Alpine run on Raspberry PI 2+. And that doesn’t include the three major BSD systems which all run on it as well…

                                                              1. 34

                                                                A self-hosted instance of Miniflux!

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  My main problem with Miniflux is that it do not support Google Reader API so the new releases of Reeder do not work with it.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    I’m using Miniflux with Reeder 4 and it is working fine with Fever API. The latest version of Reeder doesn’t support Fever anymore?

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      Yes. Additionally the Fever API is limited to only support reading, there is no support for adding new subscriptions which greatly reduce the usability of Reeder.

                                                                  2. 1

                                                                    I also recently switched from TTRSS to Miniflux. Not entirely happy with microflux on android.

                                                                  1. 11

                                                                    I haven’t desired an OS war debate since about 2005. I understand that this isn’t fair since I’m probably laying down kindling and not asking for a flame war.

                                                                    I would switch much faster if I had iTerm2 (don’t say tmux, alacritty unless they are 1:1) and a few other tools. I’ve run Gentoo as my main machine and many Linux-es in the past (all I can do for street cred folks). Xcode, the app store, economics or something else apparently just makes high quality UIs possible because it’s not the same? Monodraw, Alfred, Pixelmator and a few others. There are a few I could budge on. The Mac apps are very polished, fonts are the best and usually the UX is good (iTerm’s options boxes are kind of insane). I keep flirting with the idea but then I make a list of stuff I’d miss.

                                                                    Linux has upsides too. It’s really what I want, a Unix box. I could ditch tiling window manager clones or near-misses and get a full-on tiled thing going (of course the browser kinda of kinks the terminal based flow but whatever). That’s not my issue. My issue is that Linux is great on the server. Linux (unix) excels at text but its desktop and GUI layer has always been weird. I don’t want it to be like this. If Electron was magically as fast as QT (etc) and made it easy to layout GUIs like Xcode, maybe that would be it? I just don’t know what the issues are in the GUI space. Armchair analyst mode though: people pay for mac software.

                                                                    This just continues to be true: computers suck, macs suck the least. But everything can change with time.

                                                                    1. 6

                                                                      I’m not a fan of tmux and alacritty either but found kitty to be a great cross platform alternative to iTerm. At least if it’s the panes and tabs that you want.

                                                                      Much more pleasant configuration too if you like to keep clean dotfiles.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        What does iTerm2 do that’s not in something like gnome-terminal?

                                                                        I use both and I’d like to know about any cool features I’m missing in iTerm2.

                                                                        They look the same to me from my Linux accustomed experience, what am I missing?

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          Does anything else have “native tmux” yet? That is, tmux windows/panes are just iTerm windows/panes—you don’t need to do any tmux key commands at all. Makes persistent server sessions very nice. I believe the iTerm author implemented the protocol for this in tmux but I’m not sure if any other emulator has adopted it.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            iTerm has more customization knobs than gnome-terminal (or any other Terminal emulator I’ve used) by an order of magnitude.

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              Same, would love to know what I was missing from iTerm2. I don’t use tmux integration, not sure about other cools features that I missed. But one thing I noticed is it’s significant slower thang the default terminal application.

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                Good question so I’ll do my best. Most of this is taste but I hope I can explain a feeling.

                                                                                1. The hotkeys are nice (to me). They are quicker than leaders and are basically the same as Chrome tabs. Cmd+T for new tab, Cmd+Alt+Arrows. And of course mac apps flash the menu item and have hints next to them. But that’s iTerm leveraging MacOS.
                                                                                2. The pane splitting is easy. Moving panes is easy. Moving panes to windows or the opposite, easy-ish.
                                                                                3. Broadcasting input to all tabs is neat (but rarely used). Tmux does this too.
                                                                                4. The fonts look nice (because MacOS). I’m sure other terminals have 256-color and image support. iTerm was early on this (to me). Powerline fonts, all the fluff.
                                                                                5. The fullscreen has native and non-native options, so it’s quick and has survived the Apple OS changes.
                                                                                6. I use a global hotkey for a dev log described here.
                                                                                7. You can temp fullscreen a pane with shift+Cmd+enter. It has an overlay telling you you are in this mode.
                                                                                8. Like someone said, the customizations are great. Just one example: you can dim panes on unfocus to your liking. Even not graphics dimming, font color dimming. It’s great.
                                                                                9. The tmux stuff is neat, a bit weird (root window has to stay open). Haven’t used it a lot.

                                                                                I’ve tried the windows options. Putty (not the same thing) hasn’t changed in decades. ConEmu or Hyper is close. Hyper is a bit slow (maybe things have changed). ConEmu is close with WSL. But I’m biased because of muscle memory!

                                                                                Sorry, getting off-topic. Back to the OP, I agree in the sentiment. I’m spooked by the changes. It’s consumer facing more and more. But I don’t know if any of these things are nails in the coffin or the community will continue to workaround/adapt. There have been breaking changes on major OS versions for a long time. People working sometimes wait when they optimize for stability. But, OP, I hear you. 🌻

                                                                              2. 2

                                                                                Yeah, it’s only a matter of time. After a recent upgrade of iTerm2 my whole screen would periodically flicker wildly. Occasionally my machine (2019 Pro) would reboot. I temporarily downgraded to Terminal, and everything settled down. My text mode apps also seemed snappier. My lesson from all this: to always be on the lookout for costs when things change. Even when the change seems pleasant (timestamps on specific lines in iTerm2, tmux integration, lots of other lovely stuff). Because we suck at changing things at scale without regression.

                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                  I agree with this. And your description of Linux feeling different from macOS, at least in terms of GUIs, reminds me of this blog entry: https://blogs.gnome.org/tbernard/2019/12/04/there-is-no-linux-platform-1 IMO, to make a Linux computer feel like a real Unix desktop you need a controlling entity to smooth over the edges. Like Android or Chrome OS or even Raspberry Pi OS. Of course, purists would say “this isn’t the GNU/Linux I know”. They’d be right. But from what I can tell, we don’t even have that option.

                                                                                1. 19

                                                                                  Forgive me if this is gauche, but what is wrong with simply using bashisms? Outside of embedded contexts, where you want everything in Busybox, but writing shell scripts in just POSIX shell just seems like a tortured dialect.. The extensions are legitimately useful, so it’s also a question of why other shells haven’t implemented it.

                                                                                  Also curious is not wanting to use Shellcheck, even if it’s just for (skippable) CI-side tests. Shellcheck was the first tool that made writing shell scripts tolerable for me.

                                                                                  1. 4

                                                                                    Some POSIX operating systems don’t come with Bash out of the box, notably the BSDs. As such Bash is rarely used in them even if it is available. Even MacOS switched its default shell to ZSH.

                                                                                    Generally though I think dropping the dependency on Bash increases compatibility across the board and removes an unneeded dependency. Both of which are always welcome.

                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                      I don’t mind taking dependencies if it helps you reduce complexity elsewhere, especially if the cost is amortized elsewhere.

                                                                                      1. 4

                                                                                        You’re not the one maintaining thousands of rc scripts or build scripts for a distro/flavor. Or at least I assume you’re not. The tradeoffs communities make usually have a reason and just because you don’t see it or understand it doesn’t mean it’s not there.

                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                          But this is not about thousands of rc scripts. This issue is about one script used during the go build process. On majority of systems it will need a dependency that is immediately satisfied. On some minority it will require a single package.

                                                                                          1. 4

                                                                                            The GitHub issue appears to be a troll issue, and I agree it doesn’t really matter much in the context of the Golang toolchain. However I was responding to the thread which was speaking more generically about dependencies and script maintenance.

                                                                                            1. 3

                                                                                              Well technically at least 3.

                                                                                              But I agree in general. I fail to see why requiring bash is such a huge deal (I have read the comments here as well as the comments on the GitHub issue).

                                                                                        2. 2

                                                                                          Even MacOS switched its default shell to ZSH.

                                                                                          For a while, not any more.

                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                            What is it now?

                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                              I’m fairly sure it’s back to bash.

                                                                                        3. 3

                                                                                          One of the comments from that issue:

                                                                                          Just had my first experience with Go, which was nice. The one thing that surprised me a little bit was that bash was required to build. On OpenBSD the standard shell is a hardened ksh. bash is avoided everywhere in base so I had to install that, no biggie, but the question I would phrase in the spirit of portability and reducing dependencies is “why require more if technically all you need is POSIX shell”? I’m wondering if such a change would be desirable, aside from the question who’s going to make it happen.

                                                                                          Also, doesn’t macOS uses zsh by default now? But probably, it’ll be compatible with the bash scripts used here?

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            It seems like just another dependency to me though - and certainly one common enough most people will have, and run on most people’s systems.

                                                                                            1. 3

                                                                                              doesn’t macOS uses zsh by default now?

                                                                                              Yes, but they’re not removing bash from the standard system AFAIK

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                Yes, that comment is from me. It is my first encounter with the Go community, so after discovering they don’t completely dismiss the idea itself, I thought let’s first get some broader opinions and have a discussion with a community I’m part of before I continue this discussion in the Go thread.

                                                                                                Also, doesn’t macOS uses zsh by default now?

                                                                                                idd

                                                                                                But probably, it’ll be compatible with the bash scripts used here?

                                                                                                Good question, from a superquick check I can say it doesn’t right out fail like it does on OpenBSD with ksh.

                                                                                              2. 2

                                                                                                Forgive me if this is gauche, but what is wrong with simply using bashisms?

                                                                                                Nothing, bash really makes our lives easier, the extensions are really useful. Some people wants to only use POSIX sh, just because it is a “standard”. Some people just hates bash because it is popular.

                                                                                              1. 15

                                                                                                Nice to see the wave of defectors from OSX back to more open platforms continue!

                                                                                                I agree I’ve always found XCode frustrating to use and obscenely ponderous to set up as well. It’s not so much that it’s a GUI or that it’s complicated, I think you could say the same for VIsual Studio Code or Pycharm both of which I love, it’s that it gets in the way of what I’m trying to do 100% of the time.

                                                                                                And yeah, the MagSafe connector was a thing of beauty. My wife is clinging to her 2012 Macbook Pro for dear life :)

                                                                                                You also didn’t mention keyboard, although I realize I’m more sensitive to that than most. I find it interesting that the keyboard on my $200 Pinebook Pro is several orders of magnitude better than the one on my work issued 2018 Macbook Pro which feels like typing on squishy oatmeal.

                                                                                                1. 7

                                                                                                  Sadly, in my social bubble, I see more people moving from OSX to Windows/WSL than to Linux/BSD.

                                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                                    That doesn’t surprise me at all, and I assume that’s the largest migration direction between the “three” platforms. Most average Joe developers are already using Windows for most of their computing needs (games) and probably only used macOS because they “had to” because work involves either a Linux server or an iOS app.

                                                                                                  2. 6

                                                                                                    I’m not sure where you get the idea that there is a “wave of defectors from OSX”, the post was most likely written to be posted specifically here. I like the community and I don’t want to be that guy but this community is a small, irrelevant echo chamber in terms of world-wide OS adoption.

                                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                                      I totally agree. There HAS been a wave of people leaving the OSX platform for various reasons, but as another poster wrote they’re not all migrating to FLOSS environments.

                                                                                                      A number of them are choosing Windows instead. I myself dual boot and enjoy the best of both worlds :)

                                                                                                      Also, nobody other than Apple actually has hard numbers on this.

                                                                                                    2. 5

                                                                                                      I just bought the 2020 Macbook Pro and the keyboard is from the different planet than 2018’s, I really like it! The price was painful but there are music softwares I need daily that don’t run in Linux so I don’t really have a choice.

                                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                                        Which one? The one with no Esc key? No thanks.

                                                                                                        1. 4

                                                                                                          They brought back the escape key :)

                                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                                            The new one has physical Esc-key.