1. 3

    https://webauthn.io/ is a demonstration app from Duo Security, which explains the W3C webauthn well.

    1. 4

      Is the form on webauthn.io representative of a typical WebAuthn form? I can’t imagine your typical site visitor knowing what attestation is not what to choose for it or the authentication type fields.

      1. 1

        I believe that https://webauthn.io/ is to demonstrate capabilities to developers - to encourage up take of Webauthn rather than as a demonstrator for an application user.

    1. 1

      Why would someone submit a link that already appeared four year ago? Has there been some interesting new development about it? If so, maybe link to a blog article or whatever discussing that instead. (If there isn’t one, write one!)

      One could argue that lobsters is a kind of news aggregator and anything that appears on the front page should arguably be new, or at least something we haven’t seen before. I’m not sure it’s a good idea to resubmit a link just because it hasn’t been seen for a while. Otherwise I can imagine some users taking this to an extreme and posting a link to their favorite vim plugin every month.

      1. 2

        Lobsters has changed a lot in 4 years. There’s a much bigger audience than there was then.

        I don’t think of Lobsters as a news aggregator. It’s not HN or reddit and it benefits from not being HN or reddit.

        Otherwise I can imagine some users taking this to an extreme and posting a link to their favorite vim plugin every month.

        I think there’s definitely a line somewhere between ‘one person resubmitting something someone else posted 4 years ago’ and ‘one person resubmitting something every month’.

        1. 2

          I think it is good idea to be able to resubmit - as it brings awareness back to the subject. I have come across many good articles on their second submission, as I missed them on first submission.

        1. 2
          • Sell all the things (I feel the correct number of bikes and cars is N+1, but my other half disagrees.)
            • Bought a car, need to sell the old one
            • Bought a new pushbike [last year], need to sell at least one of the old ones.
          1. 2

            the correct number of bikes is at least N+5 (MTB, BMX, Cruiser, Hybrid, Fat…) and that’s without Cyclocross, Road, and Speedway ;~)

          1. 2

            This was also submitted here - but this was a link to https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2019/02/accessibility-webinar/ The Smashing Magazine article.

            1. 4

              While OpenBSD is nice, I always wonder why NetBSD doesn’t get more love. Surely because it’s more portable, it’s subsystems must be really clean? It might not be as secure, but doesn’t this mean things must be predictable as well?

              Sell me OpenBSD over NetBSD friends.

              1. 5

                At a certain point you basically achieve maximum portability for all the machine independent code. New CPU X comes along, and it’s got some new bit patterns for its instructions, but it’s otherwise just another model of something that already exists. The code for ls and tar and nfs is ready to run on any CPU that might possibly exist within the target space (so no 8 bit microcontrollers). The build system supports N different platforms, with N > whatever number you might manually hack around. N + 1 is just another name in an array.

                1. 5

                  Portability has not been the main point of NetBSD for a long time. Now the OS is supposed to be correct, well structured, with sane architecture, etc. For example, the fuzzing/sanitizing work that is being done is not directly targeted at improving portability.

                  1. 3

                    NetBSD wants to run on everything, no matter the cost. OpenBSD wants to run well.

                    1. 2

                      NetBSD has some cool features, but in my experience I’ve found OpenBSD to run on more hardware more easily than NetBSD.

                      OpenBSD’s focus on simplicity and security, help make OpenBSD my preferred OS - but I’m biased - my personal desktop machine has been OpenBSD since 2001…

                    1. 12

                      Why does he keep writing vim as vIM?

                      Also, “dive off the deep end” is a pretty bad way to learn vim. It fetishises the home row over the stuff that actually makes vim fast, like operator motions.

                      I also noticed that, after talking about how unnecessary most plugins are, he immediately recommends NERDtree. Does he know about netrw?

                      1. 3

                        neovim is vim improved so it is sometimes written as vIM to differentiate it from the original vim

                        1. 6

                          He also says

                          neovim is another version of vIM

                          So it looks like he’s using vIM to refer to original vim, too.

                          I’ve never seen neovim written as vIM, just neovim or vIM. TIL!

                          1. 2

                            That one could also have been an after-the-fact :%s/vim/vIM/g.

                        2. 2

                          Maybe that bloated trainwreck YCM does a good job at it, but despite my long love for Vim and friends, I just can’t be arsed doing the different configs for Syntastic and ALE and wtfever just to get C/C++ include paths right.

                          I’m also too dumb, apparently, to get as much out of gdb as any IDE gives for free.

                          And I should probably disclaim that if I did more of that C/C++ type of stuff, I might find a unified way of making things work, because IDEs ain’t perfect either.

                        1. 3

                          This is my current desk set up - I’ve put map links to the Beagle Bone Black, Raspberry Pi 3, X41 and Zaurus that are all running OpenBSD. The main monitor is linked to my Toshiba Portege (also running OpenBSD) which is on the desk behind my main desk.

                          Currently the image is being hosted on the Raspberry Pi 3 that is underneath the monitor.

                          1. 2

                            “and the Raspberry Pi and Beagle Bone Black are not running X”

                            You heard any good things about the Rasp Pi 3 running OpenBSD well?

                            “My seat is a gym ball 8~)”

                            Well, that sounds fun. Might even be a nice, stress reliever or let little movements while still sitting jolt the mind into more action at times. On top of being a chair.

                            1. 1

                              I’ve run OpenBSD on the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B and the Model B+, they work, the Model is better as the ethernet is recognised. The Raspberry Pi 3 does work with OpenBSD but I wouldn’t particularly recommend it.

                              The gym ball is much better for posture than a normal chair, partly as sitting still tends not to happen :~)

                          1. 2

                            this was submitted to lobsters here: https://lobste.rs/s/wbtins/mesh_compacting_memory_management_for_c_c

                            @pushcx is it possible to match on the arxiv number eg 1902.04738 in this case when checking if an item is already submitted?

                            1. 2

                              Thanks for pointing this out. I’ve merged these two submissions. Yeah, that seems possible to add and I’d take a PR to add this to Story.find_similar_by_url, we get enough arxiv submissions that this happens fairly regularly.

                            1. 7

                              That’s mostly technobabble in that quora answer.

                              1. 4

                                I was actually linking the answer by Oliver Emberton, which was on top at the time (#2 right now). Sorry for that.

                                1. 2

                                  I agree… I was hoping for something interesting, not a patent promotion.

                                1. 1

                                  My UHK turned up in June last year after a 3 year wait. I have not received my addon’s yet so I’m not sure how good they will be. However, I have been impressed with it, as a split mechanical keyboard, and would recommend it.

                                  I cannot compare it to an ErgoDox as I’ve never owned one :~(

                                  I have not done any configuration with it, so it is just running the default firmware.

                                  1. 2

                                    The add-ons are listed as No ETA yet on the webshop. How do you find the build quality and feel of the board? My co worker days says he finds it feeling not as he would expect for the price. (cheap, plasticy)

                                    1. 1

                                      my UHK feels robust to me - especially with the palm rests attached. It’s not a cheap keyboard but ergonomic keyboards are usually more expensive. I have used both Microsoft Ergonmic and GoldTouch split keyboards in the past, and my UHK is better than both of those keyboards.

                                  1. 3

                                    thanks for posting this, it lead me to The hardware-assisted virtualization challenge article that was posted earlier. I’ll have to boot a NetBSD machine and have a play!

                                    1. 2

                                      It’s hard to draw any conclusions from the article without knowing more about how the study was done and the actual game play. What were the participants told about the AI? Did they know it was choosing optimal moves? Did they have feedback that the AI was doing better?

                                      Maybe people ignored the AI because they wanted to play for themselves? If the AI was helping them get chores done maybe they’d take its advice more often.

                                      1. 3

                                        Looks like the research will be published by the ACM so I guess you will have to wait to get those answers. In my experience building AI systems I believe the conclusions simply because it’s what I’ve seen. People simply don’t trust AI and I would even bet if they knew it was a person behind the scenes, they would likely ignore the advice too.

                                        Interfaces based on AI will likely look a lot different than just slapping together an interface with advice. Maybe UI with opt-out vs opt-in ability would be better…

                                        1. 3

                                          The detail will be published in March 2019 at https://iui.acm.org/2019/

                                      1. 3

                                        Networking for Systems Administrators by Michael Lucas is a good book for enhancing networking knowledge.

                                        1. 1

                                          The video is available here it’s in Germany, but has an English commentary. The talk was give at 35c3.

                                          1. 8

                                            From the perspective of OpenBSD should be able to pick up pretty much any laptop, and it should work - especially if you are picking up a refurbished laptop. You can check NYC*BSD dmesg database to see what works with what. I used to take booted able usb pendrive with me to check which laptops booted OpenBSD fine.

                                            1. 6

                                              Wow - this sounds like a company that takes its security seriously. Having anomaly rules that actual trigger action, as a result of least privilege and access models, smart approach to security.

                                              1. 2

                                                Not much has changed since 2015 or 2017 if I tidy up my office I might post a picture of my battlestation…

                                                1. 8

                                                  https://imgur.com/a/Cv5KXOE

                                                  Two virtual desktops.

                                                  Despite my perennial curiosity about acme, I think the only thing I’m really into is its color scheme. There’s two kakoune windows with acme colors, and an es session with a little CLI weather app I wrote for myself. The terminal emulator is kitty.

                                                  The second desktop is a couple vimb windows, where I do as much browsing as I can.

                                                  The WM is spectrwm, which has a couple annoying bugs, but thus far the best tiling behavior I’ve found.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    I used to use spectrwm!

                                                    1. 2

                                                      Rock on, dude! It seems pretty unsupported which is a bummer. It makes me think maybe I should go back to i3. Except I don’t remember why I switched from i3 to spectrwm in the first place so I don’t know what I can check on.

                                                    2. 1

                                                      I moved from spectrwm to awesome partly as I was using at work, and partly as it works well on OpenBSD.

                                                    1. 7

                                                      Hardware support

                                                      Accelerated graphics: No; Audio: Audio works as expected though there is a known bug [causing it to] stop working after a period of time; Cameras: No; Hibernation: Maybe; Suspend/Resume: No; Wireless: No

                                                      In short, this laptop seems deeply incompatible with OpenBSD. :)

                                                      1. 4

                                                        I wrote the review (and this comment) form it. Seems pretty compatible to me. :)

                                                        I concede that things are 100%, but they never are right out of the gate. Especially with newer hardware.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          Nice! What about its battery life?

                                                          1. 2

                                                            Battery life is not great. I ran for just over two hours with full use (compiling various things, lots of network activity, streaming music videos on youtube). I fully expect it to be much better once things are properly supported.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Thank you.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Which battery option did you get?

                                                            2. 0

                                                              an xorg.conf with:

                                                              Section "Device"
                                                                 	Identifier "Device0"
                                                              	Driver "intel"
                                                              EndSection
                                                              

                                                              might fix your video output as per this bug report.

                                                          1. 29

                                                            Replace JS for your favorite language:

                                                            https://0.30000000000000004.com/

                                                            JS just happens be everyone’s favorite punching bag nowadays ;)

                                                            1. 10

                                                              Most other languages I know of let you specify that a number is an integer ;)

                                                              EDIT: wow this was a very bad brain fart, and I’m leaving it here as a testament to how quickly people will pile on on Javascript without thinking. Sorry everyone.

                                                              1. 17

                                                                0.1 + 0.2 doesn’t work well for integer math either.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  Multiple them by enough zeros to turn them into integers. Do the math in integer form for integer rules (1 + 2). Reverse the process to get float results.

                                                                  I’ve done that before a long time ago. I can’t remember why I did. Maybe just to dodge floats’ problems during number crunching. I know peoples’ reactions to it were funny.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    I’m going to point out that COBOL handles this tricky calculation “unsurprisingly” by default. We should all switch from JavaScript to COBOL.

                                                                  2. 2

                                                                    Upvoting because the edit is a good example of self-awareness and humility.

                                                                  3. 5

                                                                    the author does state:

                                                                    This behaviour is not unique to JavaScript. It is seen in every programming language where doubles are available, including C, C++, C#, Erlang, Java, Python and Rust.