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    Do you by any chance have a MOBI (Or even EPUB) format? Would be nicer to read it from an e-reader.

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        Awesome, thanks!

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        Unfortunately not! I just can’t seem to find a way to properly generate it from markdown, including the code samples with the nice syntax highlighting. I probably didn’t try enough, I’m sure there’s a simple way out there.

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          pandoc can do this, but it’s not especially simple.

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            Thanks, will check it out :)

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              That would be awesome

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              Why shouldn’t it be simple? Shouldn’t pandoc input1.md input2.md ... final.md -t epub3 -o book.epub. More epub options are listed in the man page, such as for specifying custom fonts, stylesheets and cover images.

              Then, producing a mobi file is trivial using kindlegen or calibre.

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                It’s not simple because about six seconds later I want to start tinkering with the code highlighting and maybe bump up that one margin and should that footnote have a slightly different font and…

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                  If you can edit .zip files and save it’s internal files, it’s quite simple to play around with the embedded stylesheet, since it’s just regular CSS.

                  But one should also say that Ebooks shouldn’t be overcustomized, IMO, but kept simple for the sake of compatibility and an ease of reading.

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              I can help you with this if you upload the book source on github, i have a template for generating epub from markdown here if you are interested.

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            Quick notes: needs an editor’s eyes on it, as there are typos every few pages or awkward wordings. Even before the table of contents we run into one: “…with tons of hands-down tutorials…”

            It’s very opinionated and makes bold assertions like “VS Code is the most popular IDE” and so forth. I understand the need to present a full development stack for folks following along in the book, but it’s literally halfway through the book before you’re done with that and only the remaining 50% is presenting components and other fundamental Vue concepts. I’d cite page numbers but you’ve omitted them. You begin by saying it’s optional to use all these tools and can get started without them but then you have readers follow along installing all of them next before introducing more Vue.js concepts. Isn’t that backwards from what you say at the outset; why not progress from the bottom up?

            The formatting could also use a hand; the page sizes are small and have lots of margin, so the many screenshots and code blocks have run amok a bit, spanning pages and not always easy to follow.

            Overall, beginners would be fast-tracked into writing a basic Vue.js webapp but have little understanding of the tools, why they were chosen, if there are alternatives, or if they could live without some of them. To wit, the title could have easily been The Vue with Yarn, Webpack, Vue Devtools Extension, VS Code, Vetur, Emmet, ESLint, CodeSandbox, Vuex, and Others Handbook for MacOS in Mid-2018.

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              Thanks a lot for your detailed feedback! I really appreciate it and helps me improve for the next time I decide to do something similar!

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              I don’t need this tutorial (already familiar with VS Code) but upvote for providing a tutorial in text form and not doing a youtube video!

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                (I just saw the comment!) Thank you very much! I am going through the process of making a course and every time I look at popular online courses I stumble upon video courses. Not sure why that is, but I am building a text-based course, and I hope this will not “break the status quo” but rather be an acceptable course as well, because it’s not video it does not mean it’s less “important” or “value-filled”. It’s the concepts and content organization that should matter. I’ll find out.

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                The imperative and declarative versions are, in two cases, semantically different.

                Execute something on every element with map: the for-loop doesn’t do anything with the return value from performSomething, whereas map puts the results into an array. Consider using forEach instead of map. e.g. array.forEach(performSomething)

                Finding a single element in the array: the use of a return in the for-loop causes an early exit, whereas filter will iterate through the entire array.

                Iterate over an array to count a property of each item: I can only nit-pick and say the declarative implementation as-written is more verbose than the imperative one. Please consider: items.reduce((result, item) => result + item.content.value, 0)

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                  Finding a single element in the array: the use of a return in the for-loop causes an early exit, whereas filter will iterate through the entire array.

                  There’s also Array.prototype.find().

                  With regards to this improvement:

                  items.reduce((result, item) => result + item.content.value, 0)

                  If you want to get (probably too) fancy with destructuring, you could do:

                  items.reduce((result, { content: { value } }) => result + value, 0)

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                    items.reduce((result, { content: { value } }) => result + value, 0)

                    That’s clever, thanks I will include this example!

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                      There’s also Array.prototype.find().

                      Is Array.prototype.find() ES5?

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                        I’m still not sure what aligns to ES5 or ES6, but as per https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/find:

                        This method has been added to the ECMAScript 2015 specification and may not be available in all JavaScript implementations yet.

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                          ES6 and ES2015 are two names for the same thing. ES5 would be ES2009 under the new naming scheme.

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                      Good points, thanks for the feedback, I’m editing the post to incorporate it

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                      Considering the pros of defer, there seems to be very little usage for async.

                      if you specify both, async takes precedence on modern browsers, while older browsers that support defer but not async will fallback to defer.

                      So why would you use async at all? And why do newer browsers even bother to support it?

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                        There are some (admittedly edge case) scenarios where async is still desirable. For example on the BBC News homepage if we loaded our scripts with defer, a bunch of non-defer third-party scripts would execute first and make the page feel slow. We used async instead, so that parsing isn’t blocked while the script is being fetched but it is blocked once the script is available so we can enhance the page and make it feel complete without having to wait for other scripts to execute first.

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                          Thanks for writing this, I found very little information online on when to use async is a better choice, I added a bit more information to consider this scenario 👍🏼

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                        I used to switch editor every couple months because I could not find my sweet spot. VS Code has conquered my heart 8 months ago and I love it, and it works blazing fast even on my old MBP!

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                          This is cool.

                          If you’ve been coding for 10 years professionally, you’ve done it for longer than 80% of all developers. Means only 1 on 5 has more experience (time-wise) than you

                          If you’ve been coding for 6 years professionally, you have more or as much experience as half of all the world developers.

                          If you’re 35 like me, you’re older than 75% of all developers 👴🏼

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                            For some values of “all”.

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                              Restricted to the context of the survey respondents of course

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                            I’m going to write several developer-related topics for my blog, mostly JavaScript and Web APIs stuff 😀 focusing on keeping things simple

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                              I’ve just started a side project with lots of ideas to leverage it. Right now, just focused on writing content but plenty of different directions it can take in the future, as an authority site, with services or products. Still in the “in love with the idea” phase, counting the days until I start to see the pitfalls, as usual!

                              I’m working on my “miracle morning”, that is: getting up at 6AM every day, and write a blog post by 8AM, then walk the dog and prepare for the “day job”. I used to get up at 8AM in the last 10 years, and waking up earlier is a nice productivity feeling. It’s still morning and I feel I did a lot already, which helps mitigate the always present feeling of not being productive enough.

                              Spring is here, so nice walks with the dog and vegetables in the garden are starting to raise, looking forward eating my self-grown food this summer, as usual.

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                                What time do you go to bed in order to get up at 6 already? I would really like to do something similar, but I just don’t have the energy to stand up once the alarm goes off and I remind myself that I could just as well sleep for another hour or two.

                                What kind of vegetables do you grow? We just bought tomatoes, but mostly grow herbs, where the majority is basil.

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                                  At 11PM. I try to keep a fixed schedule, 7 hours of sleep should be plenty. Key to me was moving the phone in a place I must walk to turn off. And do the bed as soon as I move away from it. And force me to stay up. I know that if I let me 1 day without this habit, I’ll use that as an excuse. I simply decided I have to. And working from home it’s easy to just sleep in. I just decide what I want to write about the day before, so I already know what I have to do and I don’t just stare at my coffee.

                                  In the garden this year I got tomatoes, potatoes, then zucchini, many types of salads, eggplant, strawberries, raspberries, cucumbers, pepperoni, chili pepper, pop-corn, peas, pumpkins and other small plants. It’s not a lot, just for personal use, but hopefully we’ll get a lot of tomatoes and zucchini this year I can give away to friends and family, as I planted a bit too many :) as last year a thunderstorm destroyed 50% of the ones I had.

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                                    That sounds good enough, although it’s hard to pull through with the bed time on the weekends (for me at least). Also, I do sleep through my alarm clock, it actually works better having the phone in the bed with me as I go to sleep, since otherwise my alarm will wake up other people but not me. I guess it differs from person to person. Still an interesting approach!

                                    That’s quite a lot of vegetables, do they not take much care? I’m kind of jealous, I’d love to grow more but at the same time I do not want to invest much time into the topic since the gardening aspect isn’t all that interesting.

                                    Thanks for your reply ?

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                                      Most of those plants need very little maintenance once they are planted, you just go and pick up the result. And I found there’s nothing better than listening to a couple podcasts while taking care of removing the weeds, so gardening is not really “losing” time and I get away from my computer for a while :)

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                                I’m working on a video course (for Pluralsight) about dealing with temporal data in PostgreSQL. It’s hard going but these things always are, and the topic is fascinating to me. There’s a lot of research and I’m learning interesting things about Postgres in the process.

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                                  I made a Udemy video course a couple years ago, I think one of the hardest things I did, as organizing, scripting, filming all by myself was not an easy task, considering I never did a similar thing, but I read somewhere that the best way to teach something is just right after you learn it. And I found also a big boost to learn new things I would have never found out otherwise.

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                                    I actually found that it’s easier to write a book. It may be longer in terms of word count (a typical course for me would be 30K-40K words which is roughly 120-150 book pages) but it’s just writing, whereas a course is writing + recording + editing, with the additional constraints of having to match the video to the narration.

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                                    I absolutely love PostgeSQL’s Range datatype for timeseries stuff.

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                                      Yes, range support is awesome but one drawback of using ranges for periods is that it’s not going to be forward compatible with SQL:2011 temporal features (if/when those get implemented), because the standard is based on a pair of columns denoting the start and end of a period.