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    This is great, I want one. Just a small comment based on my personal experience however: As someone who spends unhealthy amounts of time using the computer, finger grease build up is a serious issue. Not having key caps could get a bit gross after a while, not to mention a combination of grease and dust could(?) interfere with the switching mechanism.

    I am not saying drop everything and focus solely on cleanability, just don’t forget it as a factor. Having said that the generic market keyboards mostly suck at this too.

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      Wiping down the switches is probably OK. But as an inventor there’s like 0 chance of any given iteration of this thing lasting longer than 6 months so I expect to be swapping them out for newer revisions pretty regular. I bought (checks notes) 3 different commercial split ergo keyboards this year. :-) The switches are mostly sealed and I’ve personally never had a switch fail for any reason and I worked IT in a college computer lab. It’s not enough of a risk for me to factor it into this project which already has a dozen difficult constraints to address. Eventually I’d like the swiches to be hot swap anyway so they could be removed and soaked in isopropyl alcohol if they got greasy.

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      I really appreciate that people create these devices and that they are so passionate about them. Personally, however, I have never been interested in stuff like this because I tend to use my computer from many different positions, and in many different locations, throughout an average day. So despite actually owning a fairly nice mechanical keyboard, I almost always end up using the laptop’s built-in keyboard.

      On the one hand, I’m sure it’s not great on my wrists; but on the other hand, sitting / standing in many different positions is, at least according to my massage therapist, the best thing I could possibly do for the rest of my body.

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        This kind of use case is why I have always wanted to try a bluetooth one-handed chorded keyboard. A keyboard that I can keep in a pocket and use while walking around sounds great but they’ve always been a bit more expensive than I want to pay for something with a steep learning curve that I might not end up being able to devote enough time to that I learn to use it properly.

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          Same here, there was an article a couple of days ago about someone building their own one of those too. The cost of chorded keyboards is way out of whack with what they really are, in reality they should be cheaper than normal keyboards, which my supermarket sells for like $15. They require less physical material to build and there is nothing special about the construction.

          I think the problem is just that they haven’t caught on enough to make mass production viable. I think an open hardware effort crowdfunded on sites like lobste.rs could have a lot of success though.

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            I’ve seen a kickstarter/similar for a one-handed mobile keyboard, connected using bluetooth. I even had a colleague who had bought it but never used it.

            But I can’t find any name or reference to this keyboard anymore. :(

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              If you’re into DIY, there’s an old project description at: https://chordite.com/

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              OP here. Yeah I still use a laptop keyboard occasionally. I used to love working at coffee shops pre-covid but for me it’s mostly about limiting those sessions to short bursts then my hands are OK. I use kmonad to make the laptop built-in keyboard do some of the fancy QMK tricks like layers and mod-taps. You are right that variety is a key aspect.

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              Defining and refining my keymap for my custom keeb. Purchasing domain names but for a real project that is happening!

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                In the same line of tools, there’s Ranger and NNN, not forgetting the venerable Midnight Commander.

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                  Don’t forget broot. I do think this xplr is pretty nice. File preview would be the biggest missing feature for me at the moment.

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                  +100 hammerspoon is awesome. I have essentially equivalent mirrored configs of hammerspoon for macos and awesomewm for linux. The hammerspoon API is a much cleaner design and more use-case driven whereas the awesomewm lua API spends a lot of concentration points on ability to customize every dang pixel without providing easy ways to do common things.

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                    This looks really good. I like my current setup with git and stow at present, but this appears to solve a couple of pain points. They’re not big pain points, and haven’t bothered me enough to do more than make notes about them. But now that I know there’s a thing that handles differences between machines a little more easily, and lets me keep the dots that matter even when I need to spend a couple weeks on Windows, I’m going to need to give it a try next time I feel the urge to tinker with my system.

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                      git+stow was what I used before finding chezmoi. I highly recommend considering the migration. Because of differences between, say, work configurations and home, I had very complex stow mechanics where I had to layer in chunks of config, and as such had a series of scripts to run stow for me… chezmoi unified those and made them explicit in templates. Totally worth it.

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                        Yes, I’m in this same camp where my approach is workable at the moment but chezmoi has potential to be a worthwhile improvement. Refactoring my dotfiles is a procrastination/recovery technique I use so next major life change it’ll probably happen.

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                      Feedly is still very useful and minimally annoying for me. Eventually I’ll probably switch to something terminal based but I haven’t prioritized researching the options.

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                        • Building a custom bed
                        • Trying to adapt to steep tenting on my keyboardio model 01 keeb
                        • Reading “Designing Data Intensive Applications” finally
                        • Trying to solidify my golang fundamentals
                        • Sewing next iteration of my custom EDC zipper bag
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                          I’ve been using Dvorak for years and for vim & similiar (emacs evil, tridactyl, etc) I just use normal hjkl. j and k are next to each other on Dvorak, which is easy enough and I tend to use w,b, f/t, incremental search, or semantic jumping methods more than h/l movements anyway.

                          I do also have a layer on my keyboard with arrow keys, which I have on what would be ijkl on QWERTY (i.e. right-side WASD).

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                            As a Dvorak user I’ve found that, while it wasn’t designed with computers in mind, it’s actually still very convenient for computer/programming use (egs. dash/underscore is on the home row, +/= is also easier to access, brackets make sense since they’re put next to parentheses (next to 9/0), and so on). j/k is no exception, as they’re conveniently right next to each other on the left hand (c/v in QWERTY). h/l are also opposite each other on the right hand in the same orientation as they are in QWERTY (h/l in Dvorak = j/p in QWERTY). I find having j/k on the left hand is actually really convenient, because I can scroll (eg. a webpage with Vimium) while keeping my right hand on my mouse.

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                              I do the exact same thing, i.e. nothing. Having the hl and jk pairs on opposite hands feels good; j and k being next to each other in the right order helps, and h is on the left of l so there’s no feeling of it being backward in any sense.

                              I also have cursor keys on the QWERTY ijkl/Dvorak chtn on separate layer when I need them! Seems like we’re using a very similar layout. :)

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                                Add one more to the list. Type hjkl in their normal positions in the dvorak layout.

                                But I also have a keyboard nav layer with arrow keys arranged in a T shape that almost nothing else uses but I think is ideal:

                                left    up     right
                                        down
                                

                                I like this because it keeps my pinkie free for a hyper modifier and I find curling a finger downward easier than stretching up.

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                              Did anyone have luck with an ortho-linear keyboard, that isn’t … tiny?

                              E. g. Planck is 4 x 12, Preonic is 5 x 12, … while I could easily fill a 5 x 15 layout or a 6 x 16 layout, or even a 7 x 13, or a 7 x 14.

                              I’d love to try an ortho-linear, but having to give up tons of columns (and 1 to 2 rows) is simply not something I’m interested in.

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                                Do you count the ergodox in this group or are you looking only for non-split boards? ErgoDox has columnar stagger (mild) and plenty of rows and columns.

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                                I use org-mode for exocortex. I recently switched from workflowy. For notes I write in markdown and use a simple date-based filesystem naming structure. (Edit to expand) I keep these in git repos (one personal I call “exocortex” and one for work). I sync them across machines with simple but highly-dialed shell scripts and aliases. I supplement this with Audio Recorder from F-Droid on android as my quick voice-memo inbox system. As part of my morning routine I transcribe audio memos into my exocortex. For taking notes I have a function key I can hit that pops up a quick dialog to append a simple 1-liner note without interruping my flow. I also have a hotkey that pops up a semi-transparent vim session at the end of today’s notes file if I want to take notes on a meeting, etc. I have several simple but highly-dialed supporting scripts to read through a full journal, search a journal, append from scripts, etc.

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                                  I am super excited about this. Can’t wait to try it out and I really hope it works well. My experience with using programs others have written in haskell has been they consistently are high-quality and correct, so I’m optimistic about this.

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                                    Indeed, my experience with Haskell is also extremely pleasant. If you use Wayland and like compositors, I can definitely recommend hikari or sway, which are absolutely excellent.

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                                      I got it working on linux for some basic, but previously impossible, home row mod-tap combinations and so far so good!

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                                      • ~/.config most of my dotfiles stuff
                                      • ~/archive holds one directory per year with stuff I want to keep archived but am not actively using
                                      • ~/bin in my PATH. Holds custom scripts with no filename extensions
                                      • ~/books PDFs of books
                                      • ~/clients client work
                                      • ~/music mp3s
                                      • ~/screens screenshots get dropped here with timestamp and description in the filename
                                      • ~/voice-memos syncs audio recordings from my phone voice memo app via syncthing
                                      • assorted dotfiles I don’t control and don’t fight
                                        • The important ones are included in my home dir git repo
                                        • The unimportant ones are ignored from git
                                      • assorted OS default directories I don’t control and don’t usually fight
                                        • I do use ~/Downloads but I symlink it is ~/downloads too
                                        • I don’t use the macos ones mostly ~/Photos ~/Music etc
                                      • My home directory is a git repo. Details on my setup are on my github
                                      1. 1

                                        fzf hands down. I never run it directly, but I have it baked into a ~/bin/fuzzy-filter script and many of my shell aliases so it’s a key part of my workflow especially for dealing with situations where you end up with “choose from a list of things with partially memorable names and partial suffixes of uuids or other nonesense”. Like if I want to exec into a running docker container I can drun foo and if there’s only one container who’s name matches foo, the command runs immediately with that container’s name. If there’s more then one match though, fzf pops up a fuzzy filterable list so I type some more to pick the correct container, then the command proceeds with that container name.

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                                          Grats on cooling the rate of posting while sticking around! :)

                                          tig is my favorite replacement for git’s builtins for almost anything related to viewing repository status

                                          asdf is my preferred language runtime manager, especially when paired with per-project .tool-versions files.

                                          sl is a fun thing to install on servers to remind people to type carefully

                                          Honestly, collecting a bunch of little bash scripts to scratch your own itches though is kinda where I’m at these days. I have a cute little snippet for quickly logging notes to myself:

                                          #! /bin/bash
                                          set -eou pipefail
                                          WORK_NOTE_PATH="$HOME/.work_notes"
                                          printf "\n---\n# $(date -u +"%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%SZ")\n\n" >>"$WORK_NOTE_PATH"
                                          vim + "$WORK_NOTE_PATH"
                                          

                                          Easy modification (used elsewhere) is to take the arguments to that script and add them in addition to the date in the notes file.

                                          Another variant is used to quickly generate dated and slugged notes for meeting minutes.

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                                            Oh wow, I use something similar to your notes script to gather timestamped meeting agenda ideas, but using it to create timestamped meeting minutes is a fantastic idea. (I have ADHD, which comes with something they call time blindness, so timestamps really help me reconstruct how time passed.)

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                                              I have basically this same script, which works great from an open terminal window, but I also have a hammerspoon key binding that works globally that I can type which will:

                                              • switch to iTerm
                                              • open a new window with a specific profile I have tweaked for this (it’s partially transparent)
                                              • run my journal command which does basically the same thing yours does so I’m at the end of the day’s journal file in vim insert mode

                                              It’s really handy for note taking during video calls and other activities where the terminal window can’t be the primary thing going on.

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                                                I came to say this as well. I’m very fond of zola.

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                                                I just joined a maker space so getting an orientation on the table saw then doing some woodworking (working on a bed headboard thingy). Plus a custom gear mount for my van dashboard and maybe some 3D prints if there’s time.

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                                                  https://peterlyons.com It’s a static site generated with zola

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                                                    I blogged about my work journaling setup last year. I use the same system for a personal journal. Simple markdown files organized by ISO3339 date (properly sortable). The scripts have been tweaked but are still essentially the same. Key for me is super-low friction to add a quick note so I have hotkeys mapped and use yad to prompt for input and can easily take the content of the clipboard as input too.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      I guess you have a typo in there: I wondered what important ISO date format I had been missing since I didn’t know ISO3339, but it turned out to be about “Tractors and machinery for agriculture and forestry” :-)

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Oops I mean RFC 3339 not ISO 3339 https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3339