1. 7

    SQL is something that everyone needs to learn better (including, sadly, the people doing the interviewing). I often see people doing something in two dozen lines of JS or Python (and two or three round-trips to the DB) that could be done in a single, well-written query.

    Otherwise, Python is what everyone uses, JS is what management thinks everyone should use, and Go is the new hotness.

    1. 5

      When I was in charge of a product, we did as much as possible in SQL. For most requests, we would get JSON from Postgres and send it straight to the client. The longest queries we had were about 200 lines (we used CTEs a lot), but I believe that they were shorter than corresponding JavaScript, and we only needed one roundtrip to the database instead of several per request. It worked well.

      I agree that SQL is underrated.

      1. 2

        SQL is something that everyone needs to learn better

        Any books or other resources you would recommend for upping ones (Postgre)SQL game to mastery?

        1. 1

          SQL is something that everyone needs to learn better

          I rarely deal with databases in my current job (I mean, “real” databases, rather than just flat files of data). I can write simple SQL queries, and have done for personal websites, but I don’t know it well. Thank you - that’s clearly something for me to study more.

          […] Go is the new hotness.

          That’s promising. I really enjoyed the small amount of Go I did recently.

        1. 11

          I’d just like to say thank you.

          Your talks and podcast appearances are both informative and entertaining, and you’ve made me interested in low level topics that I’d otherwise not be exposed to (I’m thinking of your trilogy on BSD Now where you talked about epoll weirdness, if I’m remembering correctly).

          I’m not exaggerating when I say that I’m going to watch everything listed here.

          1. 1

            Could you link to (some or all) of these podcast appearances you talk about? I’d love to listen.

            1. 4
              1. 2

                The BSD Now episodes (a subset of @bretthoerner’s link):

                The three episodes are available as one merged episode:

                There are links to audio versions and RSS feeds above the show notes at the bottom of the page.

            1. 5

              I never liked the omission of the full stop at the end of the so called summary, and started adding it many years ago. There are others with similar experience. Let me link to antirez’s blog post to avoid explaining it myself: http://antirez.com/news/90

              1. 1

                Worth noting that the commit messages produced by git (like for merge commits) do not add a period (by default).

                1. 1

                  I often edit merge commits, and when I do I obviously add lacking period.

                2. 1

                  Thanks for the link, I’ll be saving it!

                1. 3

                  I kind of feel like Elixir is a fad which adds complexity - if you want to use erlang, just write erlang.

                  1. 6

                    It’s certainly a fad, just like Ruby and JS. Which is to say something that is going to deliver a ton of business value over the next decade and foster its own pop culture in a feedback loop we’re all accustomed to.

                    As someone who learned a good bit of Erlang 10+ years ago, I was initially worried about added complexity. Especially after being burned by the CoffeeScript nightmare.

                    I started writing Elixir daily at work about 10 months ago. A couple weeks of using Elixir disabused me of that. Elixir is a really seamless implementation and provides valuable support for everyday programming. The only reason I might end up reading Erlang code is if I have a problem with a dependency.

                    If you’re a glutton for punishment you can call Elixir code from Erlang.

                    1. 3

                      Saša Jurić wrote up some excellent points about why elixir. Not saying we all should do it, but there are some advantages, helpful features and superb Erlang interoperability.

                      Another thing that I enjoy about Elixir is the community. Not just the people, but the community is a “melting pot” different communities - Erlang and Ruby mainly but there’s also a good amount of people from Haskell, JavaScript and others. Together ideas meet and new concepts and ideas emerge.

                      1. 3

                        But Erlang is not the same as OTP and BEAM, and Elixir is “just” another language the uses OTP and BEAM. Sure, it’s close to Erlang in some (many even) respects, but it’s not simply a “prettier Erlang”. If anything, it’s a better engineered and much faster Ruby.

                      1. 10

                        We’ve seen two[1] cases[2] of this in Denmark in the last couple of years surrounding systems that kindergartens are using. The second one is currently (still) being investigated, but the first one was rightfully concluded earlier this year with the “hacker” being acquitted.

                        In both cases, it was dads of children in the institution that noticed the bugs when they were rightfully using the system and were ignored when notifying the responsible party about it until they “shouted it so loudly” that they couldn’t be ignored anymore, in which case they were reported to the police for hacking.

                        Links below are in danish, but they can probably be translated if needed.

                        1: https://www.version2.dk/artikel/boernehavehackeren-frifundet-landsretten-1074257

                        2: https://www.version2.dk/artikel/interview-hacker-tiltalt-jeg-totalt-uskyldig-1077581

                        1. 2

                          This paper seems to assume that a user’s WiFi isn’t also pay-per-byte, which is the case for my family.

                          1. 1

                            That sounds like hell.

                            1. 2

                              That’s what happens when you live in a rural location that no internet companies will come out to (they hotspot their cellphones).

                              1. 2

                                Rural areas are awesome. Bad internet service isn’t.

                                1. 1

                                  Agreed 100%. If I could do my job in a rural town I would.

                          1. 23

                            Electron is not flash.

                            JavaScript is flash.

                            Electron is the Adobe Air and that’s far worse than being a modern flash.

                            1. 5

                              Well, with Air you had to have the Air runtime. Electron apps are self contained, right? That makes them at least somewhat better…

                              1. 23

                                You surely mean worse? That means each Electron app potentially packages an old, unpatched runtime with similar complexity to the Chrome browser.

                                1. 12

                                  This is the new world.

                                  Developers actually think JavaScript is “low level” (I’ve seen multiple people call it ‘the new assembly’) because other languages transpile to it.

                                  Electron developers are essentially front-end web developers and/or nodejs developers.

                                  NodeJS developers by-and-large think npm is “good”. NPM’s dependency management were (and maybe still be, I don’t know) a joke. Every package got a copy of all the packages it depends on.

                                  The authors who create NPM packages are just as guilty. Depending on a hard version of a library seems to be very fucking common.

                                  The last time I bothered to check on this stuff, I posted about it: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=11092772

                                  1. 13

                                    NPM’s dependency management were (and maybe still be, I don’t know) a joke.

                                    It still is. I work on a small node.js project at work. I was explaining npm to some Haskell programmers. They were horrified when showed the project’s node_modules directory, which contained:

                                    • 8 copies of esprima, a JavaScript parser
                                    • 11 copies of glob, a glob implementation
                                    • 12 copies of readable-stream, which is an implementation of something that’s also in node.js…

                                    I probably shouldn’t say “copies” because for each there’s at least 4 different versions.

                                    npm’s installation is also non-deterministic. You can install the same dependencies twice and get a different layout of packages in your node_modules directory.

                                    1. 1

                                      npm’s installation is also non-deterministic. You can install the same dependencies twice and get a different layout of packages in your node_modules directory.

                                      That should be fixed with Yarn. It’s just amazing that the JavaScript community took this long to build a solution.

                                      1. 1

                                        There’s also ied, which does a pretty good job.

                                    2. 1

                                      Yeah, npm isn’t so good, that’s why Facebook came up with Yarn, which seems to solve a lot of the shortcomings of npm. We’re transitioning to it at my company and its working great. With npm, we intermittently saw builds fail because of non-deterministic package resolution, which yarn solved.

                                    3. 2

                                      It’s hard to argue with you. You’re right, but I feel there’s maybe a bit of nuance here.

                                      In the case of Air, one vuln definitely takes out all of the Air apps on the system. A vuln in Chrome / Electron, is likely targetting one specific version, or a small range of them. In the event all Electron apps have a slightly different version, you might actually get lucky from time to time!

                                      1. 1

                                        A vuln in Chrome / Electron, is likely targetting one specific version, or a small range of them. In the event all Electron apps have a slightly different version, you might actually get lucky from time to time!

                                        Unfortunately life shows it’s the other way around.

                                        Take the recent Linux remote UDP vulnerability as a perfect depiction of what usually happens.

                                        1. You have a ton of systems, devices shipping a different version of the Linux kernel
                                        2. Not all of them receive security patches
                                        3. Someone finds a flaw and it happens to impact every kernel from 2.6 up to version 4.5

                                        The situation you are depicting would only work if every security flaw was contained to a single version of the bundled runtime - in reality it’s more likely that it will impact a range of versions and bundled software is less likely to receive security updates.

                                        The only thing that changes is having to patch each and every copy of the runtime in case of a security issue instead of patching the single system wide shared runtime.

                                        1. 1

                                          Unfortunately life shows it’s the other way around.

                                          It happens both ways. Some versions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, for instance, weren’t affected by this UDP vulnerability, but your point is taken.

                                          Maybe the thing to agree on is that shipping any software results in some sort of security risk.

                                          1. 1

                                            Maybe the thing to agree on is that shipping any software results in some sort of security risk.

                                            I would lean towards: “any shipped software that is not actively maintained and doesn’t receive security patches”.

                                            1. 1

                                              Between the time the patch is identified, fixed, and release there is a window of non-zero time. An active maintainer can reduce this time, but in many cases, the user isn’t forced to update, nor is this time 0. Even worse is if the vuln is actively exploited before being disclosed.

                                        2. 1

                                          Given that taking over one app lets you control all the others (you’re now running with users privs) I’d have to say this is a worse position.

                                          1. 1

                                            It’s bad anyway you look at it. Maybe the Electron model is worse because the number of different versions possible for the runtime increases the likelihood of one being vulnerable. But maybe, just maybe, the track record of Adobe is so bad that the chances of Air having vulnerabilities far exceeds the likelihood of Chrome having vulnerabilities, even when many different versions are installed on the system?

                                            But, I don’t disagree here!

                                      2. 2

                                        In 2011 AIR shipped an embedded runtime feature, so you could do the “self-contained” route if you wanted to.

                                        1. 2

                                          I was not aware of this!

                                      3. 2

                                        I am reading this while listening to Spotify, whose desktop app is Adobe Air. Tool to task people, all this vitriol is misplaced.

                                        1. 5

                                          Spotify is only good because they have a huge selection of music. Both their iOS and Mac app is the worst app I have installed on either platform, except maybe iTunes.

                                          1. 2

                                            So, if you judge the apps in terms of the native Apple ecosystem, sure, I’m with you. But at least for me there is a sense of Good Enough and spotify for me personally at least is Good Enough. I can play my music, I can browse music my friends are listening to, I can enjoy the myriad playlists Spotify and my friends create. It Is Good Enough.

                                            1. 2

                                              Sure but in that sense, CDs are good enough too. Luckily, most aim for better, not just good enough. If they didn’t, the world wouldn’t improve.

                                              1. 2

                                                Totally agree. However this is a case where in an ideal world, everyone would develop native clients for every platform and life would be grand.

                                                But, in the real world, every development man hour has to be justified to the bean counters, and for my needs, I would much MUCH rather have a Good Enough client that runs on my Mac, my Linux desktop, my phone, my FireTV, etc etc etc than a deliciously smooth native client that’s Windows only and to heck with everyone else :)

                                                1. 1

                                                  Well yeah, but for someone huge like Spotify, Slack, Github and so on, I don’t think it’s justified at all. And I’d rather use something else. Only problem is that apples native music player is even worse in this particular case :p

                                      1. 3

                                        I have a 2014 MBP. Not sure how you would even know this was going to happen, but hopefully it never does.

                                        Is this more of a one-off thing or have there been a lot of reports on that model?

                                        1. 4

                                          My MBP 11,3 has minor battery swelling, which manifests itself in the mouse not clicking correctly.

                                          EDIT: Thank you for the concerns for my safety. I live very far away from the nearest Apple store, and am replacing it with a Dell XPS 15 9560.

                                          1. 7

                                            Please go and fix it, It’s a very, very serious risk. And Apple is very interested in fixing it.

                                            1. 1

                                              Last I checked, Apple didn’t give a shit about pregnant batteries that are out-of-warranty; went to a couple of stores in SV in 2012, and they said my battery is still “safe to use”, even though it no longer fits within the laptop. It didn’t even have the number of recharge cycles that it’s rated for, and makes the trackpad completely unusable, and even the back cover can be hardly closed when the battery is in.

                                              http://apple.stackexchange.com/questions/76797/swollen-pregnant-battery-on-a-macbook-13-aluminium-late-2008

                                              I still have it somewhere. Did they change their policy, or what?

                                            2. 2

                                              This is the only way to tell if the battery is swelling on the newer aluminum models without opening it, I’d look into it if I were you.

                                              1. 2

                                                My battery had swollen so much that it deformed the bottom case and my retina macbook didn’t sit straight on a table anymore. Apple fixed it even though it was out of warranty.

                                              2. 2

                                                My MBP 11,3 has minor battery swelling, which manifests itself in the mouse not clicking correctly.

                                                Swelling occurred on the original battery in my MBP 9,1 (mid-2012) with similar trackpad problems. I replaced the battery myself with one from One World Computing and it continues to work though one edge of trackpad remains raised slightly above the case.

                                                I’m not sure what I’ll replace it with, but Dell and Razor are contenders.

                                                1. 2

                                                  Good, they should.

                                                2. 2

                                                  Years ago I had a plastic MacBook, and my boss had I think a MacBook Pro, which each had trouble clicking at different times because of battery swelling. This puts it in a whole different perspective. Eesh.

                                                3. 2

                                                  If this is caused by the battery swelling, I think your case will swell as well.

                                                  But I’m not certain.

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I haven’t seen anything widespread.

                                                    The proximate cause here was probably all of the air vents being blocked by the bedspread (on the 2015 model they’re spaced around the bottom of the case in a kind-of U shape). Heat a LiON battery up enough, and this is the result.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      I don’t think that’s a defensible position for Apple since that is a widespread use case for laptops and with all the tech packed into MBPs why don’t they have sensors to prevent this sort of thing from happening? Before the forced shutdown is mentioned, that was too little too late and was most likely a CPU threshold being hit, nothing to do with the battery.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        The battery was almost certainly compromised already, causing the overheating. The dropping sounds like it was the final straw.

                                                  1. 16

                                                    Reading the review, it sounds like you can probably go through Google’s cache or an Internet Archive for the affected pages, and find random (private) HTTPS sessions in the public caches.

                                                    I’m finding private messages from major dating sites, full messages from a well-known chat service, online password manager data, frames from adult video sites, hotel bookings. We’re talking full https requests, client IP addresses, full responses, cookies, passwords, keys, data, everything.

                                                    Unbelievable.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      I believe they waited until major search engines had purged this data from the cache, to make this public. So you could, but can’t anymore.

                                                      1. 13

                                                        Google is actively purging data, but at the time of publication there was still secret data readily discoverable. To say nothing of all the other “not major” search engines which can also have caches. Nobody knows who or where this data has been cached.

                                                        1. 4

                                                          Nope. Read Tavis’s summary in the Google report, also there have been reports on Twitter of data being found in search engine caches

                                                          1. 4

                                                            All search engines and other services that caches things like Yandex, Baidu, NSA and lots of others are probably not so eager to purge their caches/loot.

                                                        1. 5

                                                          Looks pretty, but is it horribly resource intensive like all other web-tech based “native” apps?

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Of course it is. That’s the trade off of having the ability to build any ui ever with simple mark-up that’s been around years and built by a coordination of several large corporations.

                                                            1. 6

                                                              Have you measured?

                                                              I assumed the same, but I used it for a day and it idles around at ~40 MB memory, which is about the same as iTerm2 uses.

                                                              Still, hitting command-I to debug why my font settings weren’t applied is gold :).

                                                              1. 8

                                                                Have you measured?

                                                                Yes, I run find / in hyper and gnome-terminal. Hyper didn’t even start strolling the buffer, it just choked.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I can replicate that issue, but it still hasn’t led to a significant increase of memory use for hyper for me, which points to an application issue and not a general issue with the electron runtime like /u/voronoipotato suggests.

                                                                  I’m not a huge fan of electron for different reasons (it being oddly opposed to platform standards and visuals on any platform), but “GTK/Cocoa is just faster/more memory-saving” is slowly becoming a non-true statement.

                                                                  (The tracking issue is https://github.com/zeit/hyper/issues/1169 by the way)

                                                          1. 4

                                                            So I’ve been encouraging people to switch to thinkpads.. but since they’ve gone off trying to replicate the Macbook, what hardware do people recommend?

                                                            The T460 I think is probably going to be my last thinkpad if they stay going this “no FRU” path.

                                                            1. 5

                                                              People have been recommending Dell XPS to me. I held one for a moment, it felt decent.

                                                              1. 5

                                                                The issue for me with the XPS is that they don’t offer a non-touchscreen version with 16gb Ram (stuck at 8gb).

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  The XPS 13 is an excellent piece of hardware, better than any available MacBook.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    Provided you’re comparing to the 13" macbooks.

                                                                    The current selection in 10-11" laptops is disgraceful. I can’t find anything that has enough RAM and won’t tip backwards, other than the macbook air and macbook 2015.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Does it support 16GB of RAM?

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        Yup! And there’s a version that comes from the factory running Ubuntu because it’s part of Dell’s Project Sputnik.

                                                                    2. 2

                                                                      It’s pretty nice, barring some really annoying design decisions:

                                                                      • power button glows really brightly
                                                                      • the laptop-connecting end of the power cord has a blinding white LED all around it
                                                                      • there’s a huge light on the side of the laptop (facing you) that glows with the light of a thousand suns whenever it’s charging
                                                                    3. 4

                                                                      I personally don’t think there has been a great ThinkPad since the T61 (2007). I used mine until late 2013 when I got a MacBook.

                                                                      I wish they kept the legacy going, those were some truly beautiful laptops.

                                                                      1. 4

                                                                        I’ve been really happy with my Surface Book. Wonderful screen, touch is one of those little things that you don’t use much but it makes them better when you do (likewise the pen for signing PDF forms), keyboard feels great to me (but I like a light touch and short travel, others may disagree), first-party dock is immensely practical, battery life is plenty, other specs are good enough.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Do you run Linux on the Surface Book? Did you try to run OpenBSD?

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            No. Was planning to try FreeBSD on it but then I found WSL worked really well for what I needed and I couldn’t be bothered. There’s a community on reddit (SurfaceLinux) and I’ve heard some positive things, but don’t know the details.

                                                                        2. 2

                                                                          HP Spectre 13 came out as my vote of choice recently. Very happy with it. Best keyboard I’ve had in years, and it’s blooming quick too.

                                                                          1. 2

                                                                            I don’t think the problem is the hardware. There is lots of great PC hardware out there. Maybe not comparable on build quality, trackpad, and battery, but hardware that has other things going for it.

                                                                            The problem is that there is no desktop OS that compares to macOS. This is especially true for laptops.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              I use mac os for work and windows 10 at home. I really don’t see any real difference beyond user preference.

                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                What about user experience, intuitive interface and general better design?

                                                                                I don’t use windows but I help a fair lot with their windows machines, and nothing feels smooth, intuitive. The only thing I like is the combined menubar+dock. I loathe the macOS dock.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  I don’t think anything about windows is unintuitive. Windows acts largely like it has forever (aside from the Windows 8 start menu/metro thing). There’s nothing difficult about it. The macOS dock is bad, and I also think the launchpad is terrible. Finder is slower on my 2015 mbp (512gb/16gb/i7) than Cortana/search is on my Windows 10 desktop (512gb/8gb/i5). Not very much, but it’s noticeable. Both of them are SSDs.

                                                                                  General better design is completely subjective. I happen to prefer Windows 10 looks to macos. Different strokes!

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Oh HOLY SHIT YES HOW I DESPISE THE FREAKING SQUISHY APPLE LAPTOP KEYBOARDS!

                                                                            Every time I type on my laptop for extended periods my wrists hurt. Going back to my mechanical keyboard is SUCH a relief :)

                                                                            Why Apple doesn’t feel that keyboards are important is beyond me.

                                                                            1. 4

                                                                              I used a mechanic keyboard at my last gig. I prefer the keyboard on my MBP. Maybe they do too.

                                                                            1. 3

                                                                              Legitimate question, what do most people think they get out of upgrading to a newer MacBook Pro from a moderately recent model (circa 2012/2013), when:

                                                                              1. The processors are not faster in real world use cases
                                                                              2. The dGPU are only marginally faster
                                                                              3. There isn’t more RAM (we’ve been maxed out at 16GB on a MacBook Pro for… around 7/8 years now?)
                                                                              4. There isn’t more SSD storage space (256GB to 1TB have been available on MacBook Pro models for years as well).
                                                                              5. Same retina screen resolution (understandable if you’re upgrading from a non-unibody to a unibody retina–the screen upgrade is definitely worth it!).

                                                                              I’m on a 2012 T430 Thinkpad that performs likely very close to a 2015 MacBook Pro (Intel i7 3630QM, 16GB RAM, 2x SSD).

                                                                              I just bought a HP 2570p (yet another machine from circa 2012), with the intent of upgrading it with 2x SSD, 16GB of RAM and an i7 3720QM to run Qubes OS (thus the 3720QM. I need VT-d!). All of this will cost me less than $600 to do, and gives me the portability (the 2570p is a 12.5" and weights 3.5lb–heavy for the size, but not heavy in the absolute sense) and performance of a 2015~2016 machine for a fraction of the price.

                                                                              1. 4

                                                                                Legitimate question, what do most people think they get out of upgrading to a newer MacBook Pro from a moderately recent model (circa 2012/2013), when: […] I’m on a 2012 T430 Thinkpad that performs likely very close to a 2015 MacBook Pro (Intel i7 3630QM, 16GB RAM, 2x SSD).

                                                                                It’s a matter of preference, but one of the reasons that I buy MacBooks, besides liking the thin/light hardware (I cycle quite a stretch to work every day), is macOS.

                                                                                Sure, I could buy a Thinkpad or HP laptop for half the price, but it would be heavier and it wouldn’t run macOS. That would be a downgrade for my computing needs.

                                                                                1. 3

                                                                                  It’s a completely valid reason indeed. I see many talk about wanting to switch away from Apple hardware, and there is indeed a lot of great hardware out there. The real problem is that there exists no comparable (imo) desktop OS. Especially true for laptops, and running macOS on non-Apple hardware just seems barbaric.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    Sorry, I meant upgrading from a circa 2013 MacBook Pro. The last two paragraphs is just to add context in terms of where I’m coming from.

                                                                                    I personally don’t see much difference between the retina unibody models of the last few years, and while yes the 2016 model is absolutely thinner (and slightly lighter), is that the primary motivation?

                                                                                    I’ve used the 2013 retina model previously and am currently using the 2015 model at work, and I would be hard pressed to say I see or feel a difference at all

                                                                                  2. 2

                                                                                    If you do anything that involves a GPU in some fashion, then upgrading is worthwhile. I tolerate Apple’s anemic GPUs because my workloads typically don’t involve them, and macOS is so good.

                                                                                    Being able to run games like HotS just fine on the laptop screen is really nice, though!

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      This only applies if the fashion in which the GPU is involved is for actual graphics, right? Afaict the cards in the new MBP are not bad as graphics cards, but not that useful for GPGPU, mainly because they aren’t Nvidia, and Cuda seems to have won that space for now.

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        Indeed. But 40Gb Thunderbolt does open the possibility to have fast external GPUs [1]. I am currently doing my CUDA work on a Linux box that I SSH into. But the prospect of running CUDA on an eGPU on my Mac is quite exiting.

                                                                                        [1] http://barefeats.com/tube21.html

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          Intel GPUs are actually pretty good for compute, they’ve been shipping significant performance improvements in recent generations and Skylake is impressive.

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            The main problem is that a lot of libraries use CUDA (and only CUDA) for GPU computing. Hopefully Tensorflow on OpenCL will make some strides.

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              For deep learning specifically the situation will get better in not too long. There are efforts to add OpenCL support for TensorFlow including the first SyCL support that got merged to master in the last week. I don’t know as much about scientific apps though.

                                                                                      2. 2

                                                                                        According to the chart, 802.11ac seems to be the only change. Also, a 2012/2013 machine with AppleCare would be coming out of warranty about now.

                                                                                        I just noticed on that chart that the 2016 model that I briefly had actually downgraded its max WiFi speed from 1.3 Gbit/s on the 2015 model to 867 Mbps. Not that I’d ever reach either of those speeds but boy, Apple sure did cheap out on this new 2016 model.

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        I plan to use it to finally start signing commits in Git and Mercurial.

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          say whaaat?

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            Via GPG, likely. That’s what I’m doing.

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              By why through keybase? Makes no sense to me.

                                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                                Like worr said above, just treating it like another keyserver.

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  Roger.

                                                                                        1. -5

                                                                                          In my opinion, people should stop using proprietary software… Things like these wouldn’t happen in the open source world. I don’t get why people who want their computer to do what they ask them to do use Win/Mac!

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            Because it’s too much work getting a machine that is not a Mac running macOS to do all the things you need them to for, say, work?

                                                                                            I would love to run something open. Maybe Arch Linux or FreeBSD. But I can’t as my main OS. I need a way to properly work with Photoshop and InDesign files in the event that a client only can deliver a design to me in those formats. I need a machine that at least can go 7 hours without being charged. I need a machine that can print, read a PDF, something, something, something, something reliably.

                                                                                            There is just so many things that I rely on for making money, and 7 years of Linux variants and main OS and 10+ years as Linux and BSD server experience has not given me any proof that a Linux or BSD machine can fulfill those needs. Not good enough.

                                                                                            Sure, Gimp can read Photoshop files, but can it do it correctly? Can I edit and save them correctly so they can be opened correctly in Photoshop again? I wouldn’t bet on it.

                                                                                            I would love to not be in the mercy of Apple, but there is just not any way around it as I see it. Maybe if I only did server-related work, but I don’t. I also do web, Mac and iOS stuff.

                                                                                            Oh, and running something open on my desktop/laptop, and then have a iPhone or an Android phone in my pocket? The irony shouldn’t escape anyone.

                                                                                            We need a billionaire who wants to fix this, and don’t want to make any money doing it, so we can get a desktop OS and a pocket-device+OS that is free and at the same level of functionality, UI and UX as what we get from Apple and Microsoft before a lot of people like me can go that route. Unfortunately.

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                                                                                              At various stages I ran Linux, FreeBSD or OpenBSD as my primary desktop OS for many years (intermingled with IRIX and Solaris), including 7 years of Linux on laptops (2000-2007). I was happy running a Windows in a VM for those applications I needed for my dayjob, but the straw that broke the camel’s back was iffy suspend/resume.

                                                                                              I’ve been using Mac laptops since the end of 2007 and I can count the number of failed resumes per year on one hand. Yes, it’s a proprietary OS from a company that seems to be moving away from supporting power user features, but for my use case, it’s the best option out there, for now. I need to get stuff done and a desktop I need to tinker with endlessly doesn’t let me do that.

                                                                                              a billionaire who wants to fix this

                                                                                              For a long time I thought Ubuntu had a real chance, not of “dethroning” Apple or Microsoft, but of providing a credible alternative. But lately it seems as if they’ve lost focus a little and done too much their own way (cf. Mir and some of the mobile options, which I think take focus away from their original goal). But that’s just my 2c.

                                                                                              Going off on a real tangent now, but innovating in the desktop UI space is hard. Apple’s UI is still an iterative improvement on NeXTSTEP and Microsoft’s is the same, but based on Windows 95. Not sure where I’m going here, but it’s disappointing that we don’t seem to have progressed much in 20+ years.

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                                                                                            Aqua on OS X and usually a full-screen iTerm with tmux for serious work ;).

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                                                                                              What version of OS X are you on? I might be wrong, but I don’t think Aqua’s been there for years.

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                                                                                                Aqua is still the name of the default OS X GUI.

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                                                                                                  My bad.

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                                                                                              95%+ audiobooks for me these days. I get in 10-20 hours of listening during a regular week, which amounts to a book or two, depending on the length. I usually jump between 2-4 at a time unless one has grabbed me exceptionally. Most of the time is walking to and from work, taking breaks outside, doing chores, taking a bath, making meals, etc. If I’m alone and just eating for sustenance I’ll put on an audiobook then, too. If I hear something I want to take notes on, I’ll stop whatever I’m doing and listen again while taking notes.

                                                                                              I don’t have room in my apartment to keep more than a shelfful of physical books, and I’m considering buying a Kindle, but haven’t quite felt the need yet.

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                                                                                                Do you feel like audiobooks and “books you read” are the same thing? Asked another way, do they satisfy the same part in you, or do you feel like they are two different things, and if that is so, which do you prefer?

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                                                                                                  If I set aside time to just sit down and read, I’d usually slightly prefer a paperback or ebook, but not the choice I’m making. I’m getting reading in during what would otherwise be downtime, which usually keeps my backlog short enough that I don’t feel a real desire to get extra reading done otherwise. This lets me still read more than most, and also do other things I enjoy with my leisure time.

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                                                                                                I want to learn data science related things for a very simple and stupid reason: The guys who know it seem few and far between, and there’s apparently a lot of demand for them, so I wanna be that guy.

                                                                                                I’m familiar with statistics, but I’d need a refresher on the theory, and I need to learn all the bayesian inference stuff. Also, how do I work my way from there to machine learning, deep learning and more advanced stuff like that? If any of you guys have resources you can point me to, please do. Turns out I really enjoy playing with numbers that way, and also telling people that a delta between two averages that both have huge standard deviations is probably a bad idea if they want to know how much traffic they’ll have on Black Friday.

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                                                                                                  The Data Science awesome list on GitHub might be useful.

                                                                                                  For that matter, there are awesome lists maintained on GitHub for just about anything tech related. I found the one linked above by searching “awesome data science !gh” on DuckDuckGo. the !gh part is called a bang.

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                                                                                                    I found the one linked above by searching “awesome data science !gh” on DuckDuckG

                                                                                                    Damn … I just added 7 awesome-<lists> to my Instapaper. I dont know when I’m gonna have time to get through it all and pick the goods from the not so good, but it all looks so awesome that I want to!

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                                                                                                  First non-trivial code written in the last year… possibly two years, if mentoring junior devs through some iOS, some React, and some Git pains doesn’t count.

                                                                                                  Spent several hours making a music streaming Android app. Bootstrapping from almost zero knowledge, this meant several deep-dives in Activity/Service differences and lifecycles, Media Sessions, locks, network, various types of views, adapters, blah blah blah.

                                                                                                  Android’s complexity is boggling compared to every other stack I’ve used. (MacOS, Win16 & 32, AWT, WxWidgets, GTK2/3, Tk, various embedded toolkits, Web, iOS…) I’d complain in a blog post; but, I’m almost a decade late to the show. I (continue to) blame Java (mentality).

                                                                                                  Regardless: super excited. That rush with each piece of functionality coming online. That ever-growing todo list of polish and bugs. Oh yeah, this is why I love(d) programming.

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                                                                                                    Spent several hours making a music streaming Android app.

                                                                                                    Several hours? Doesn’t sound like that much :p

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                                                                                                      Don’t say that! ? I’m hoping it gets less painful with experience…

                                                                                                      Four hours reading docs. Two hours writing code.

                                                                                                      The official docs are copious but of varying quality. Interesting reading; but, very very very frustrating.

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                                                                                                        Depends if you mean a proof-of-concept thing or finished app. A finished app taking 6 hours I think is unheard of :D

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                                                                                                          Proof-of-concept. I don’t expect any of this code to survive. (Famous last words.)

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                                                                                                    Clones open the door for potential confusion. While copying a file may take up no space, so too deleting a file may free no space. Imagine trying to free space on your system, and needing to hunt down the last clone of a large file to actually get your space back.

                                                                                                    Did anyone else watch Silicon Valley last night?

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                                                                                                      Confusing to a point only a lady named Bernice will get it…