1.  

    any crustaceans heading there? (assuming tickets…)

    1.  

      yup, I will.

      1.  

        yes! It will be my 11th congress

        1.  

          If I manage to get a ticket, yes.

          I really want to iterate, even though it’s a way longer drive for me, Leipzig congress center is way way way better than Hamburg’s. I hope it will stay in Leipzig forever.

          1.  

            I was sloppy and missed the ticket window last year, going to try harder this year (and prebooked hotel) - was pretty satisfied with Hamburg (much less so Berlin - the grumpy tone in some of the various queues the final year there was very discerning) so slightly hyped if Leipzig is even nicer.

            1.  

              I dunno, Leipzig is a bit too large for my taste. I liked the fact that I could easily run into people I know in Berlin and to some extend in Hamburg too, but it is impossible in Leipzig. It lost a bit of the “family gathering” vibe for me..

              1.  

                according to Wikipedia, the Hamburg location had 12´000 visitors and 15´000 for Leipzig. Does not sound like a big difference

                1.  

                  a venue at capacity with 12000 people is something else than a entire fair ground with even more halls to use. The size difference between Hamburg and Leipzig is quite substantial.

            2.  

              If i can get a ticket yes.

              1.  

                yes…

            1. 3

              Is anyone on mac OS using Alacritty as their daily driver? I’m eager to get away from iTerm2 even if just because the increased sanity of my dotfiles because of the YAML configuration format instead of a constantly modified plist!

              1. 5

                I recently switched to Terminal.app (the builtin terminal) from iTerm2 because it’s slow for no reason. I used none of the features of iTerm2 often enough to warrant using it. If you’re seriously considering Alacritty as an alternative, then switching to the default terminal would probably work for you too.

                1. 5

                  100% agree. I’ve gone from iTerm2 → Alacritty → Kitty, and as mentioned in my other comment, I could probably just use Terminal.app now.

                2. 1

                  Been switching a few weeks ago, love it since then. Just note you would need a terminal multiplexer for some features (like tabs, split screen, etc). Also, you could miss the command+click facility to open a link (tracked here). Overall I still find the experience to be better than with the other terminals.

                  1. 1

                    I did for a few months, using tmux. I like it for the most part (especially live-reloading of the config), but switched to kitty [1] about 2 weeks ago and haven’t regretted it. I switched because while Alacritty is (was?) faster than iTerm2, I would experience a lot of slow redraws in tmux, and some other things. I’ve found kitty to be faster. I honestly could probably just use Terminal.app at this point if I could set up some basic shortcuts correctly.

                    [1] https://sw.kovidgoyal.net/kitty/

                    1. 1

                      I have been using iterm2 for years and never had to edit a plist file. What are you doing that requires that constantly?

                      1. 4

                        I’m not editing it. Rather, it seems every time I exit it, something gets written to its plist file, which I’ve symlinked into my versioned dotfiles.

                    1. 10

                      Why do people think MS is doing all this? Do people really think a company worth 860 billion dollars has anything to give away for free? I do not want to go into MS bashing, but believing that a big company like MS is now altruistic and believing in making the world a better place is just naive. MS wants to be seen as cool and hip with the dev. crowd, esp. the young Sillicon Valley crowd, so that they can sell more Azure. They do not care about software freedom or anything like that.

                      1. 12

                        Goals can align. Microsoft might care about software freedom because that improves their business in some way. In this case, their goal is obviously to collect metrics about users. Almost all of the code is open though.

                        1. 3

                          I don’t think thats an obvious goal at all - metrics about users. A perfectly acceptable goal is to regain mindshare among developers. vscode can be seen as a gateway drug to other microsoft services, improving their reputation.

                          1. 2

                            I wonder what metrics from a text editor would be useful to them?

                            1. 10

                              I want metrics from the compilers I work on. It’d be super useful to know what language extensions people have enabled, errors people hit, what they do to fix them, etc. Sounds mundane at first, but it’d allow me to focus on what needs work.

                              1. 8

                                Well, VS Code doesn’t choose your compilers :)

                                either way, I don’t get the paranoia. Performance telemetry, automated crash reports, stats about used configurations – not stuff that violates privacy in any meaningful way. It’s weird that this gets lumped in together in the general paranoia storm with advertisers building a profile of you to sell more crap.

                                1. 8

                                  Issue #49161 VSCode sends search keystrokes to Microsoft even with telemetry disabled

                                  It’s not even paranoia so much as irritation at this point. I know my digital life is leaking like a sieve, and I’d like to plug the holes.

                                  1. 3

                                    Kinda clickbait issue title. Yeah, keystrokes are always a lot more worrying than metrics, but this is settings search. I guess you could Ctrl+F search for something secret (e.g. a password) in a text file, but not in the settings.

                                    1. 12

                                      You know, there was a time when it was big news if a commercial program was caught to “phone home” at all. It didn’t matter what the content was.

                                      (Today, you’d call a ‘commercial program’ a ‘proprietary application’.)

                                      It’s still a big deal today if an open source/community maintained/free software application ‘phones home’, because reasons: untrusted individuals, the value of big data, and principles of privacy.

                                      Now that M$ is in the game, let’s add ‘untrusted corporation’ to that last list.

                                      I don’t care what the nature of the data is–I don’t want to be observed. Especially not as I ply my craft–few activities produce measurable signals from any deeper inside myself, and every one of those is definitely on my personal ‘no, you can’t watch!’ list.

                                      1.  

                                        For me personally, I have no problem adding telemetry to apps I maintain. But I’m sure going to make sure users know about it and can disable it if they want. I think that’s the real issue - consent.

                                      2. 5

                                        That’s having to think way too hard about what they’re intercepting.

                                2. 4

                                  Platform it’s running on, type of code being edited, frequency of use for a given feature. Heuristic data about how people interact with the UI. The list goes on. Note also that none of this need be evil. It could be seen as collecting data looking to improve user experience.

                              2. 3

                                I’d guess they’re after a platform. They want to build a base (using organic growth) that they might later on capitalize on, either by learning from it to invite people to use (proper) Visual Studio or by limiting VSCode’s openness.

                              1. 7

                                spending quality time with the girlfriend, bake a sour-dough bread, some nice big cycling tour and setting up unbound on my vpn raspberry pi.

                                1. 2

                                  Unbound? VPN Raspberry Pi?

                                  1. 2

                                    I run an openvpn on a raspberry pi at home. I currently have a dnsmasq based DNS setup on it (a bit like pi-hole, but self made). I want to replace it with unbound since that is a better caching resolver than dnsmasq.

                                    1. 1

                                      sounds like a neat project. What’s vpn all do, just let you act like you’re on your home network from outside? What do you need to know your home IP to connect?

                                      1. 2

                                        I have a Synology NAS that stores all our photos and I use the notes app as well. I travel a lot, so it is nice to have a vpn when I am using a public wifi. The girlfriend uses it for the same purposes.

                                        For connection I have a bit of a strange setup: my provider is dual stack, but the IPv4 is carrier grade NAT or something, so unreachable from the outside. IPv6 can be routed though. So my trick is that I run socat on a cheap/dumb scaleway instance that forwards IPv6 and IPv4 to my pi on IPv6. That way I can reach it from everywhere and only the scaleway box can talk to it.

                                1. 18

                                  Odd, because I didn’t read the XKCD comic as making fun of security people for saying ‘voting machines won’t work, stay away’ at all. I read it as saying voting machines won’t work and that we should stay away from them. And to that I have to say: I totally agree. Voting works fine as it is: done by humans, counted by humans, entirely on paper with not a computer or network in sight.

                                  1. 4

                                    Elections are really hard regardless if it’s done by computers or not, but we didn’t get to the point where we figured out the computer side of it at all. What’s worse, is that adding computers into the mix was an excuse to go back on well-tested election related rules, such as secret voting. No, we can’t have voting over the internet or via mobile phones or anything like that.

                                    We should really go back to limiting computer involvement in elections to UI, with the papertrail as the official record of votes. Involving computers in the actual process adds such a huge leap of complexity that it excludes most people from ever being able to verify results. Everyone can verify paper ballots.

                                    1. 6

                                      Not really sure why you’d even want computers as UI. The ‘UI’ of a piece of paper you tick a box on really is quite good.

                                      All I can say is that I’m glad that New Zealand has never (as least to my knowledge) involved computers in actual voting. Not even UI. I hope that the complete disaster that was our recent attempt at doing a census online[0] will help dissuade anyone from trying to do elections online as well.

                                      [0]: Somehow they managed to simplify the census, put it online, reduce the number of questions and get fewer responses than before even though it’s still mandatory. What. And in return for significantly reducing the amount of information we get from the census, now they have a mandatory incredibly invasive survey of a randomly selected few percent of the population.

                                      1. 3

                                        The reason for fewer responses may have little to do with technology and more to do with that notorious citizenship question.

                                      2. 1

                                        What’s worse, is that adding computers into the mix was an excuse to go back on well-tested election related rules, such as secret voting. No, we can’t have voting over the internet or via mobile phones or anything like that.

                                        There’s designs and protocols for that. We could even have diverse suppliers on the hardware side to mitigate the oligopoly risks. The question is, “Should we?” I think traditional, in-person methods combined with optical scanning is still the best tradeoff. The remote protocols might still be useful to reduce cost or improve accuracy on some mail-in votes, though.

                                      3. 4

                                        I absolutely agree. Voting should be as simple for voters to understand as possible. Introducing an electronic device makes it auditable only to experts and even they might have a difficult job given the many layers at which things can go wrong (including hardware vulnerabilities).

                                        One of the reasons people are advocating electronic voting is their lower cost. Personally, I think this argument is totally wrong. Cost is a factor but not the most important one - not having elections would be cheaper.

                                        1. 2

                                          And let’s face it, how significant is the cost of having elections really? The 2008 general election in NZ cost about $36 million. Sounds like a lot, but that’s $12 million per year: 1/1719th of the Government’s budget. Spending 0.058% of the budget to ensure we have safe and fair elections is pretty insignificant really, it’s about as much as is spent on Parliament and its services and buildings etc, and about half as much as the Police earn the Government in fines from summary infringement notices (speeding tickets etc).

                                          1. 4

                                            Exactly. Also, lots of good things can be said about software but not that it’s inexpensive.

                                        2. 3

                                          100% agree. I counted votes in the last federal election of Germany and that is some serious work, but totally worth it and very hard to tamper with.

                                        1. 1

                                          I do not like the click-baity title, but I kept it the way it was. There are some interesting extensions listed that I never heard of before.

                                          1. 3

                                            It looks like there are some “interesting” extension nobody else has heard of before.

                                            Like that Web Security addon, which appears to send all your navigation data to their servers over plain http, using some homegrown “crypto” to obfuscate the details. According to their privacy policy, they build a profile for advertising purposes.

                                          1. 7

                                            As far as Tech-newsletters go, I can really recommended the Nixers newsletter. If one reads sites like lobste.rs regularly, it may contain a few things one might have already seen, but especially if you were a bit more busy over the week, it’s a nice summary.

                                            1. 1

                                              I like the fringeness (is that a word?) of it. It feels it is off the mainstream and I often really like the quote of the week. A really well done newsletter!

                                            1. 4

                                              I feel old, because I know about where vim came from even before react and its sponsor “facebook” existed.

                                              1. 0

                                                Yes I do.

                                                1. 6

                                                  okay, I just opened a socket. How do I go from here? /s

                                                  1. 2

                                                    I’d like to see a C++ developer reimplementing Qt to distribute software because he shouldn’t trust Qt.

                                                  1. 3

                                                    I asked an applicant to a job posting I had open to complete a short 30-minute coding exercise when they didn’t have any public code available. Really, they had no Internet presence except for a barebones LinkedIn profile.

                                                    They provided their code test result as a git bundle and specifically called attention to their commit history. I was thoroughly impressed. It was like they’d memorized Deliberate Git, my favorite talk about git etiquette. Their code was great and the story the commit messages told was enlightening. They got an interview.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      They got an interview.

                                                      Typo?

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Why? Singular they is a thing.

                                                        1. 1

                                                          When you don’t know their identity (see what I did?). “Whoever broke in cleaned their tracks”.

                                                          It causes confusion when used in cases like this.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      We used CSV for a project in university. A friend set up a server on his home computer and the three of us could easily collaborate. We were the only ones using any form of source code mgmt in our course, others where mailing each other zip files, I believe. It was pretty okay.

                                                      In my first job I had to work with MKS source integrity, a source code management system invented by aliens or something. Awful, awful, awful. We then switched to SVN, for which i had to write some wrapper scritps to make the import work.. I believe they are now using git everywhere, I surely am using i for all my private and professional projects.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        The problem is, that we have to treat work as an environment where we do not feel like we are surrounded by predators. Sure, you can steal somebodies purse and car keys or even lunch to prove a point, but honestly, I do not see where that leads to. Yes there are bad guys and all that, but things have to stay in balance. Are we all supposed to have firearms on ourselves just in case? That is what this seems to lead to. Be afraid of everybody and trust nobody. What kind of a world is that?

                                                        Also, laptop locks are funny these days where everybody has a Mac and no way to lock them…

                                                        1. 7

                                                          Be afraid of everybody and trust nobody. What kind of a world is that?

                                                          Capitalism?

                                                          1. 2

                                                            “An armed society is a polite society.” -Robert Heinlein, Beyond This Horizon

                                                            The point of the talk is that security starts at the physical world, and that everyone is afraid of “evil hackers” or Russia/China, when they should be concerned about who’s in their facilities.

                                                            An unrecognized face should definitely be questioned, which is why at high security facilities (i.e. an airport), keys and cards are required to get into say, the data room, with an escort. Obviously, visitor badges should be required, and an escort is a good option, also, in order to keep out the bad guys at the physical layer (obviously, this doesn’t include security at every other layer, such as a legacy telephone system voicemail running on NT 4.0 that can be NetMeetinged into and compromised very simply, or someone having a 0-day for a service ran on-site and exposed to the public).

                                                            1. 3

                                                              “An armed society is a polite society.” -Robert Heinlein, Beyond This Horizon

                                                              By that definition the US is the politest place in the world. It clearly is not.

                                                              1. 1

                                                                It may not be, but then again, not everybody in the U.S. owns a firearm.

                                                                1. 10

                                                                  The US does own many more firearms than other notoriously more-polite societies (Japan, say) though.

                                                                  The obvious conclusion here is that there’s no real reason to think that the fun Sci-Fi Writer had any real insight into or facts to support his take on the topics of armed civilians, trust, and what makes for a livable society – at the end of the day it’s just a pithy turn of phrase.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    Im a pro-gun person from a former, murder capital in the South: Memphis, TN. Most of us would laugh at the quote given the number of assholes and thugs we’ve run into in our lives.

                                                                    We do think a high amount of firearms, esp concealed, reduces number or success of physical attacks since many attackers are basically wimps or arent in top shape mentally. Many of us think of it as check against government worst-case scenarios. For many others, it’s a tradition, recreational activity, family bonding, protecting cattle/crops, and/or self reliance for food sources. A few deer can feed a poor family quite a while for the price of some bullets. Grocery stores nowhere near that cheap.

                                                                    It doesn’t make the area more polite, though. Some situations are even scarier when they might have concealed weapons. Hell, some calm people become assholes when they have power of life and death at their fingertip.

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      An armed society is a society that thinks problems should be solved with arms.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        An armed society is one that thinks a corrupt government might be a problem that takes guns to solve. That problem and solution is how America itself was created.

                                                                        Then, they created a Constitution. It said most problems are to be solved by individual citizens within the country’s laws, legislative bodies, executive branch/agencies, and court system. And in pro-gun America, that most problems are resolved using those instead of the guns totally disproves your point in general case. Cops and gun owners rarely shoot people out here. Mostly gangsters doing that.

                                                            1. 2

                                                              Good enough solutions are often good enough.

                                                              1. 0

                                                                worse is better!

                                                              1. 9

                                                                A netflix FreeBSD kernel engineer ways in on Hackernews: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=17346020

                                                                1. 6

                                                                  His reasons for sticking with FreeBSD over DragonflyBSD are also interesting. It looks like there will be an update in near future using code they’ve already written which closes some performance gaps between the two in some configurations.

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  Does anyone know any more about this? I’ve never heard of it and it seems very new, but there is already a BallerinaCon in July? Looks like it’s owned by WSO2 who I’ve never heard of before either.

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    It has been about 3 years in development but we really started talking about it earlier this year. The origins indeed have been in WSO2’s efforts in the integration space (WSO2 is an open-source integration company and had a research project on code-first approach to integration). Ballerina is an open-source project - at this moment has 224 contributors.

                                                                    It is getting a lot of interest in the microservices and cloud-native (CNCF) space because it supports all the modern data formats and protocols (HTTP, WebSockets, gRPC, etc.), has native Docker and Kubernetes integration (build directly into a Docker image and K8S YAMLs), is type-safe, compiled, has parallel programming and distributed constructs baked in, etc.

                                                                    You can see lots of language examples in Ballerina by Example and Ballerina Guides.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      I actually posted this hoping someone would have more info. The language looks interesting and far along to be under the radar.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        The company seems to be based in Sri Lanka. It is nice to see cool tech coming from countries like that.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          The company seems to be based in Sri Lanka. It is nice to see cool tech coming from countries like that.

                                                                          The project has non-WSO2 contributors as well, and WSO2 has also offices in Mountain View, New York, Pao Paolo, London, and Sydney, but indeed Colombo (Sri Lanka) is the biggest office so at the moment my guess would be that Ballerina is 90% from Sri Lanka - which indeed is a fantastic place! :)

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        Now we get to enjoy cross-site-scripting in all desktop apps. Isnt that a wonderful world, we live in? /s

                                                                        1. 34

                                                                          It’s a hipster-free

                                                                          This may just be the most hipster thing I’ve seen since COBOL on Cogs

                                                                          1. 6

                                                                            COBOL on Wheelchair also exists.

                                                                            1. 5

                                                                              do not forget bash on balls: https://github.com/jneen/balls

                                                                            1. 9

                                                                              I have been doing remote work for 5 years and I think the “work room for work” and “don’t work in your pyjamas” rules are overrated. I am doing just fine typing this from my couch while waiting for a build to finish.

                                                                              1. 8

                                                                                For my first two years working remotely I had a dedicated office in my house. I think that helped me to build the discipline and boundaries necessary.

                                                                                6 years in, I can work effectively and with balance in about any situation.

                                                                                1. 5

                                                                                  Same here; I think the rules for “transitioning from office-based work to remote work” are very different from “effective remote work for someone who’s used to it”.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    I found out that when my home office became my work office my new home office was the coffee shop after working hours.

                                                                                  2. 1

                                                                                    I work from home about 2 days a week (at my last job it was 3 to 4). I often didn’t shower until the end of my work day and I’ve never been in a place large enough to have a separate work room.

                                                                                    I do run multiple X servers. Ctrl+Alt+F8 is my work X11 instance and I have a different username for it. My git repos have my work/home laptops as each others remotes so I can push branches back and fourth without touching origin. (I often squash some of those intermediate commits before creating a real origin pull request).

                                                                                    I often find my time at home is way more productive. Open work spaces such and even my fancy noise cancelling headphones can’t drown out some of the chatter around me.

                                                                                  1. 5

                                                                                    this full-throttle tinfoily panic mode of some people right now. “move to hosted gitlab!!1 that will show ‘em!!11”. i’m not anti-gitlab, but hosted gitlab has the same set of problems like github. like, for example, being bought by $EVILCOMPANY

                                                                                    if microsoft now decides there will be no more free repos, it’s ok! they can do with their property however they please (just like before that acquisition github could’ve done). don’t bitch about the free lunch not tasting right. that is the deal if you use resources of others for free.

                                                                                    1. 3

                                                                                      I think for most people, if gitlab took a similar turn, a self-hosted (or pay someone else to host it) OSS version of GitLab would be fine.

                                                                                      People use gitlab.com because it’s hands-off, not because it’s the commercial version for free.

                                                                                      1. 3

                                                                                        It’s not “that will show em” at all. No idea where that is being quoted from.
                                                                                        I can say my statement was, IF the MS acquisition bothered you, and there is enough historical precedent that it may reasonably do so for reasonable people, then note that Gitlab does currently have 1-click repository migration from GitHub. In addition that is is also a possibility that Github may unilaterally sever that capability IF the migration becomes a flood. Ergo if you are going to do it, then do so now and don’t wait.

                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                          it was a purposely overstated made-up-quote (easily spotted by the liberal use of “!!111”).

                                                                                          microsoft is an actor on the market and as a result does things to maximize profits. one only has to take that in account when choosing to use their services. i’m not overly happy with it either, but gitlab is an actor too and plays by the same rules, including the possibility of being acquired. just self host, it’s not even hard, scaleway has prepared images for that for example.

                                                                                          regarding the importing functionality: if they break the mechanisms to do that, i guess many other things won’t work as well, like bots acting on issues, etc. i don’t think they will break the whole ecosystem, as effectively that’s what they’ve paid for. maybe they’ll do that in the extended future, like twitter breaking their api for clients.

                                                                                        2. 2

                                                                                          Imagine what would happen when MSFT after buying GH also gets travisCi , which i believe they will do :)

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            It should also be quite a bit cheaper, afaik they never took VC money.