Threads for galdor

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    I’m working on a small service to handle CSP (Content Security Policy) reports. They seem to be tricky enough that lots of people ignore them, so I thought there was an opportunity to do something useful. It also means I am probably going to have to start contacting people to see who might be interested and get some feedback.

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      In the same vein, if are using Emacs, Forge (https://github.com/magit/forge) extends the incredibly well designed Magit to work with GitHub, including reviews. Documentation is quite good too: https://github.com/magit/forge.

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        Just a nitpick, but forge itself doesn’t support (most) code-review-like functionality; that’s actually handled by external packages that are usually used alongside forge, e.g. code-review.el.

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        For myself:

        • Working on my personal server. I’m trying to delegate services as much as possible: maintaining your own infrastructure is fun, but it takes time. I already have moved DNS to a provider, and I am slowly migrating multiple email accounts and Dovecot/Fetchmail to a single Google Workspace account (at least it is my own domain).
        • Improving my Gnus (Emacs) configuration to deal with the way Gmail handles IMAP labels.
        • Probably starting a new Satisfactory base now than Update 6 is out.

        For work:

        • Finishing the Docker runner for my job scheduling platform (it currently only support local execution and Kubernetes).
        • Start writing some documentation.
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          I love hearing about folks personal servers. I think I’m like you - i use it as my test bed and playground for things i want to learn. What is your favorite thing you host locally?

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            Not who you’re replying to, but I’d probably list gitea as my favorite thing I host locally. It’s small, lightweight and an amazing little service.

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              And if you don’t care about collaboration features in the web ui, cgit is a very light and straightforward option.

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                I used to use bare repos on an ssh server, but switched to gitea because it can be configured to create a repo on push. This allows me to easily create new repos from any machine with access.

                Now I use it as an authentication store for some services. Gitea can be an oauth provider and is much simpler than many of the alternatives to run.

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              I host all my private Git repositories (because I can and because all Git operations are way faster than with GitHub, which is satisfying when pushing). I also have NGINX for my website, a private IRC server (ngircd) for a few friends, a mail setup with Fetchmail/Dovecot and Influx/Grafana (mostly for the fun of it).

              Everything is running on FreeBSD and managed with a deployment system written in pure POSIX sh.

              While it sometimes means a couple hours spent upgrading the system or fixing some kinks, it is satisfying. I have learned a lot about software and ops that way.

              Note to any developer out there: running your own server will change the way you design software. Running in production is not easy.

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                Note to any developer out there: running your own server will change the way you design software. Running in production is not easy.

                This is a weird statement. Change how?

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                  When you run a server, you have to deal with software not working properly, because it happens all the time. Thus you learn how important it is to write precise and meaningful error messages with the right context. You learn how software should behave consistently, and how this behaviour should be documented.

                  Having to deal with software in production is a good wakeup call for all developers.

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                    I’ve been keeping a personal server for years (website, VCS, file synchronisation, file sharing, chat servers/client/bots, central place for all my note keeping, all sorts of Internet processing), but I don’t share your experience. Things go wrong very rarely, mostly during development. The worst problem I’ve had was with the laptop killing its battery circuitry and then randomly shutting down, resolved by retiring the machine.

                    If anything, I’ve learnt to use #!/bin/sh -e and actually keep logfiles–cron mails error output automatically, systemd needs to be nudged into doing that. Knowing that something’s wrong at all is what’s important.

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                Also not who you’re replying to, but I love hosting Snipe-It locally to track all the machines flowing in and out of my repair lab (plus my own machine and parts collection).

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                I always felt like the right balance for DNS was: run BIND, but only as a “hidden master”; let some third party service AXFR from you and handle all of the public requests.

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                  That’s what I do for my domains. It works well.

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                Yawn another sans-serif.

                Sure, Go Mono is the one true serif monospaced typeface, but it would be nice to see some competition.

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                  I’ve used and liked Verily Serif Mono as well

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                    The Triplicate font by Matthew Butterick is both monospace and a true serif.

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                      JetBrains Mono NL is an excellent alternative.

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                      I am seriously impressed by the quality of this font. Very regular, very readable; I would put it at the same level as PragmataPro for coding.

                      Vertical alignment is correct for arrows (<, -, >, =…). It is possible to choose among multiple styles of zero characters. I have not seen any line height issues in Emacs and in XTerm.

                      Unicode coverage could be better, but this typeface is brand new, so I guess it will improve.

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                        Thanks for the kind words, this is how it looks on iTerm: Berkeley Mono iTerm screenshot.

                        I will get better over time with new glyphs and features. We’re planning for a condensed version next.

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                          Honestly, you may want to try Input. You can modify it a bit to suit your tastes. I use it simply because it seems to make it very easy to distinguish between curly braces, brackets, and parentheses at very small font sizes, at least better than any others I’ve seen. there’s free licenses in addition to commercial ones so I don’t feel much guilt plugging it.

                          Love it.

                          https://input.djr.com/preview/?size=17&language=clike&theme=default&family=InputSans&width=200&weight=200&line-height=0.9&a=0&g=0&i=serif&l=serifs_round&zero=slash&asterisk=0&braces=0&preset=default&customize=please