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    I haven’t used this, but I have used lunr, which promises the same thing. It wasn’t a great experience, and the index quickly grew too big to be a good idea. To be honest I can’t really see a use case for something like this. If your content doesn’t change very often, just use google/bing/whatever to search your site, if you can’t have any server-side moving parts.

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      If your content doesn’t change very often, just use google/bing/whatever to search your site

      This might not be the best way to do for some usecases, like i would not like to wait for an external service to index my pages. Also i don’t have any control over how i want things to be indexed/categorized etc. I’ve been using https://docsearch.algolia.com/ for my personal wiki, it’s been an wonderful experience so far!

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        A good use case is offline documentation.

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          That’s a good idea

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          It would be interesting if you could shard the indexes so that you get good long-term caching. If your site adds contents slowly then you should be able to generate an (relatively large) index of all of it at one snapshot and then a much smaller index of the newer contents. Both can be marked with multi-year caching policies, but the URL for the second one will change every time you add contents to the site. Once the second index is sufficiently large, you add a third, until the aggregate size of the newer ones is sufficiently large that it’s better to download a complete index.

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          some lectures are not on YT, any idea if they’ll be available publicly? :)

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            AIUI only Gernot’s seL4-related lectures are public, the rest are for enrolled students/staff only.

            Still, you get slides for these too.

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            Last December i started using twitter for things other than shitposting, I noticed that everyone be taking notes and sharing stuff. I came across this guy https://twitter.com/visakanv he puts all of his threads on notion (https://www.notion.so/the-best-of-visakanv-s-twitter-threads-1a6ed25cf06e49e388a303903d597b73)

            Overall I was very inspired and I organized all my HN, Lobsters, Reddit, In browser bookmarks etc. and spent more than a week organizing all the links in a way that made sense to me. I used https://docusaurus.io/ for the wiki and then I just keep adding stuff to it now. Best thing is I can just do whatever i want to it as it’s not limited by anything here.

            I just update it locally and whenever I feel like putting things up, I just git push. I am totally loving the flow.

            Just in case you’re interested in my wiki, here’s my favorite page: https://wiki.geekodour.xyz/docs/notes/history :)

            Also I sort of documented my personal note taking strategy( it’s kind of bs tbh, but works for me :) ): https://wiki.geekodour.xyz/docs/notes/guides/notetaking

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              This is so great! I always feel like putting my thoughts out but posting it on twitter or any social media always gives me some bad feeling about what if this hurts someone, what if someone judges me etc. Putting notes in ~/todo.txt l does not always suffice and I can’t check it with my phone. I am planning to modify this a bit to directly write things to my wiki. I really like the minimalist approach. Thanks for sharing this :)

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                I’m working on hosting:

                I have so many domain names lol.

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                  heh, the login page is imposing, yes.

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                    which irc server are you running?

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                    i read three virtues of great programmers and felt good for a while :p

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                      recently i had some issue with understanding one of your post so i asked it in the #os-dev channel. i was surprised when you replied for it. you’re inspiration.

                      all the best!

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                        I remember you :) thanks for the well wishes!

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                        Very much outdated, but very useful as an introduction.

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                          can you share more uptodate links on this?

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                            I don’t know any. I just can tell that all described solutions appeared long time ago. It does not include newer approaches - e.g. forwarding kademlia (used in Swarm).

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                          Back when bsdjobs.com was more than a bunch of links to companies I compiled out a list requirements companies had for kernel hacking roles:

                          • Schedulers
                          • Virtual memory
                          • Numa design
                          • System bandwidth considerations
                          • Understanding of 64bit x86 architecture
                          • Read and write x86 assembly
                          • Analyze, debug and fix kernel crash dumps and defects.
                          • Deep and current understanding of the C programming language
                          • Programming in Intel x86 and/or ARM assembly (64bit preferred)
                          • Understanding of modern CPU design (out of order, superscalar)
                          • Low level debugging experience
                          • Genuine passion for kernel technology and systems engineering
                          • Extensive knowledge of hardware platforms & processor architectures
                          • Familiarity with FreeBSD, Linux, IP, TCP, HTTP, TLS, DNS, and BGP

                          I am going to dig further into this starting with the ARM ARM (Architecture Reference Manual) between the ‘just for fun’ books I plan to read over the winter break.

                          I also plan to learn more about IPv6, there are only about 400 RFCs to read so that should go quickly :D

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                            i think that’s a nice list to follow. commenting to keep this bookmarked :p

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                              That’s my learnlist too :)

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                              the proc file system is great for all kinds of stuff: like determining where a process is in reading a file:

                              https://gitlab.com/snippets/1757653

                              Super useful when you have a process reading a massive file with no indication of progress.

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                                cp /proc/$pid/fd/$fd /tmp/important.conf is a classic sysadmin trick that I’ve actually used precisely one time to great applause (okay, extremely moderate appreciation).

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                                  I recently found that one could actually see all the fd’s a process is using and now I am seeing this it’s so cool. I read a lot about “use strace, use ptrace” when do you actually use these? I work on small C projects and don’t really know when should I be using them.

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                                    A few times recently I’ve wanted to know why a process wasn’t working properly. Looking at my bash history, I have run strace startx and strace openssl s_client -host rout.nz -port 443. If I remember correctly, I wanted to see the log output from startx which wasn’t being written to disk properly, and I wanted to see where openssl was looking for certificates.

                                    Both times I’m pretty sure I ran strace then grepped for things like open(, read(3 and write(3. There are probably better ways of doing this, but they worked for me both times.

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                                    Looks like what I’m looking for but it’s a pity it’s not open source and that it requires an email (and I didn’t see a privacy statement).

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                                    • A period prediction tool using standard linux utilities
                                    • Investigating two bugs on Alpine Linux
                                    • Regular maintenance work as usual

                                    IRL i got socialist literature from my grandparents a while ago, and now hope to find time to read some of the books.

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                                      hello, I am a beginner in os dev. and i wanted to contribute to alpine linux. should i start by trying to fix bugs or should i install it and playground with it initially.

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                                        My involvement with alpine boils down that i’m using it as desktop system and for production servers, and if i find bugs or things that annoy me, i try to work out fixes. Also writing documentation. Rather boring work actually, but afterwards people are glad somebody did it.

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                                        IRL i got socialist literature from my grandparents a while ago, and now hope to find time to read some of the books.

                                        That’s not something you see on a regular basis.

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                                          Yeah, one would usually use AFK. IRL makes it sound like the Internet is outside of reality or something.

                                          I hope to find some time to read a little as well. Young Marx is quite fun.

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                                        I just finished releasing my first browser extension! I wrote typescript for the first time.

                                        Check it out: Twitmarks - Twitter bookmarks for the web https://github.com/geekodour/twitmarks