Threads for geier

  1. 17

    then it can help you make your code more concise and readable.

    # Reuse result of "func" without splitting the code into multiple lines
    result = [y := func(x), y**2, y**3]
    

    I don’t get it. Is this just to avoid writing one extra line, like this?

    y = func(x)
    result = [y, y**2, y**3]
    
    1. 12

      The article explicitly addresses this objection:

      You might say, “I can just add y = func(x) before the list declaration and I don’t need the walrus!”, you can, but that’s one extra, unnecessary line of code and at first glance - without knowing that func(x) is super slow - it might not be clear why the extra y variable needs to exist.

      The walrus version makes it clear the y only belongs to that statement, whereas the “one extra line” version pollutes the local scope, and makes your intention less clear. For short functions this won’t matter much, but the argument is sound.

      1. 5

        with y = func(x):

        1. 5
          for i in range(3):
              print(i)
          print(i)  # prints 2
          

          Local scope gets polluted all the damn time in Python. I’m not saying that’s desirable, but it is part of the language, and that’s a worse argument then most.

          y with the walrus, as written in the article, pollutes local scope anyway, by the by, as the result of func(x). No intentionality is lost and you’ve done literally the same damn thing.

          Do what you can’t do and you’ve got my attention. (For my earlier post, using it within an any, at least, takes advantage of short-circuiting (though implicit!))

          1. 1

            y with the walrus, as written in the article, pollutes local scope anyway, by the by

            You are correct, I should have tested myself before saying that. So yeah, the benefits look much weaker than I had supposed.

        2. 10

          Yeah, I find the walrus operator redundant in almost every case I’ve seen it used. If I’m feeling generous, I’ll give partial credit for the loop-and-a-half and the short-circuiting any behavior— but it was wrong to add to the language and I’ve banned it from any Python I’m in charge of.

          Edit: Also, the accumulator pattern as written is horrendous. Use fold (or, yes, itertools, fine) as McCarthy intended

          1. 9

            You can make the same argument with only minor modification of the examples against many things that now are considered not just acceptable but idiomatic Python.

            For example, you always could just add the extra line to manually close a file handle instead of doing with open(some_file) as file_handle – so should we ban the with statement?

            You could always implement coroutines with a bit more manual work via generators and the yield statement – should we ban async and await”?

            You could always add the extra lines to construct an exception object with more context – should we ban raise from?

            Hopefully you see the pattern here. Why is this bit of syntax suddenly such a clear hard line for some people when all the previous bits of syntax weren’t?

            1. 12

              I once had a coworker that felt that functions were an unnecessary abstraction created by architecture astronauts. Everything people did with functions could be accomplished with GOTO. In languages without a GOTO statement, a “professional” programmer would write a giant while loop containing a series of if statements. Those if statements then compared with a line_number variable to see if the current line of code should be executed. The line_number was incremented at the end of the loop. You could then implement GOTO simply by assigning a new value to line_number. He argued that the resulting code was much more readable than having everything broken up into functions, since you could always see what the code was doing.

              1. 3

                “If the language won’t let us set the CPU’s IP register, we’ll just make our own in memory!”

                Yikes.

              2. 1

                with is a dedicated statement. It does 2 things ok, but only them, no more. You can’t add complexity by writing it in another complex structure like a list-comprehension. The walrus can be put everywhere, it’s vastly different IMHO.

            2. 4

              I also find that in result = [y, y**2, y**3] it’s much clearer to parse what’s going on at a quick glance, while you need to think more when coming up on the walrus.

              Even clearer might be result = [y**1, y**2, y**3].

            1. 4

              Are rounder dock items really one of the most exciting features of a new major Mac OS version update?

              1. 5

                When addressing someone, we’re advised, “know your audience”. When reading something addressed to millions of people, know when you’re an outlier among the audience. Yeah, most users are going to think the look and feel is the most significant change.

                1. 1

                  I do sometimes look at a conversation about operating systems and wonder if I should join in, but very often the discussion is about the difference in appearance in screenshots. And this is amongst software developers.

                  It’s a bit disappointing when I want to geek out about filesystems, context switches, scheduling, user vs kernel mode drivers - and learn something. That’s one reason I check the news on lobste.rs more than anywhere else.

                  1. 1

                    I see what you mean. Do you feel like an end user facing marketing article like this one is an off-topic link?

                    1. 2

                      Here, yes, but I don’t mind too much. I can just ignore it. So long as there are also more technical articles posted I’m happy!

                2. 4

                  For the regular user it will be the first change they will see. Also the overall design of the whole system changed, so this may be pretty important for the users. On the developer side there are other changes, like for example removal of files for dynamically loaded libraries. Now these will be loaded from system cache.

                  1. 3

                    This tweet should win a prize for “best at saying what we’re all thinking”.

                    1. 2

                      And it’s not even a good design. I’ve been using it since early dev previews. Even after getting used to it, I still don’t like it. It has uneven spacing, inconsistent border radii. It feels like if it was a 3rd party amateur iPad-themed skin for macOS (reminds me when I used to skin WinXP to look like a Mac).

                      It has real usability failures — gray items in the semitransparent alerts can be totally invisible depending on what background you have. Sheets were replaced with alerts centered in the window (far away from the toolbar), and with centered text. It makes alerts’ long text descriptions look like a mess, so applications will stop explaining the details. The control center 1:1 copy from iOS feels bizarre when operated with a mouse. Toolbars are low contrast and lots of buttons are borderless or with very very faint borders.

                    1. 3

                      I use the neo2-keyboard layout, which has a layer that maps the arrow-keys to the (qwerty) wasd-keys. I think this is better than using hjkl, because i don’t have to move my hands of the home-row and it works in every program that allows arrow-key-navigation (including vi).

                      1. 1

                        Same here. Cannot recommend neo2 enough (at least for German speakers).

                      1. 2

                        At least for German speakers (writers?) I can’t recommend the neo2 keyboard layout enough, which does contain the arrow keys on level 4 (one modifier) in a very similar position, togeher with all the other control characters (enter, escape, tab, page up/down, start, end, etc.).

                        1. 2

                          I really like some aspects of fossil, like the integrated issue tracker and wiki, but I really dislike not to be able be to squash commits.

                          1. 1

                            I also squash commits in my dev branches before merge[1] but it’s an easy philosophy to accept: the local history is permanent. That said, when I was using fossil I had a work flow of creating a temporary dev copy for each feature with all the mess and then a second “real” one that I would rsync the completed changes to and commit. The “real” one had a nice neat version of development.

                            [1] Does anyone really need to see “and again”, “nope, typo”, “and fix the test”, “bump”, “wtf didn’t that work” and such from integration and what not?

                            1. 1

                              [1] Does anyone really need to see “and again”, “nope, typo”, “and fix the test”, “bump”, “wtf didn’t that work” and such from integration and what not?

                              There’s the germ of an idea rattling around in my head that the answer to this question should be correlated with the answer to the question “should I record for posterity literally every single keystroke made in my text editor?”

                              1. 1

                                In my opinion, this relates to version control - in my opinion - being not complex enough. For example, you could have the best of both by having a notion of a “patch bundle” that wraps a couple of smaller changes.

                                1. 1

                                  When I squash commits it’s not just about keeping the commit log tidy. Some mistakes or “wip” comments I really don’t want the world to see (though I’m fine with having them in a feature branch which I delete later).

                          1. 6

                            I think the score should be removed and only the averaging N.NN per story/comment part should remain.

                            The “by karma” page should become “by average karma”, etc. …There may be some value in a 2D view of that where the second axis is post/comment count…

                            Unfortunately I fear the changes I propose will destroy my ranking.. not that it’s a popularity contest or anything… :~(

                            1. 5

                              The average has its own issues, e.g. it incentivizes not commenting on older or less active threads, even if you have something constructive to say, since they will receive fewer votes. If you switch focus to that, I suspect you’ll increase clustering of activity even more.

                              (Also it’s easy to go from post count and average to total karma, if people feel so inclined, and post count feels like the least nonconstructive user stat to display.)

                              1. 1

                                I agree. There’s also less votes for corroboration since they’re seen as unwanted me too’s rather than a useful part of data collection. Dissent can get many negatives even though it can be positive. There’s also the clickbait effect where focusing on certain topics can get higher votes.

                                The average has been least useful metric I’ve noticed. And one more thing from statistic’s class: it’s not supposed to be applied to individuals at all. At least I was taught it’s about identifying and analyzing trends across a group or whatever. So, we’d be looking at the values over time of a bunch of Lobsters comparing them and who knows why we’d do that. tldr An individual metric using a technique not for individuals.

                                Note: I did intro to statistic but not much else. Weak area for me. Just had well-studied folks tell me this a few times. Statistics experts feel free to chime in.

                              2. 5

                                I’m honestly way more obsessed with my average score than my total score. Reasonably or not I see it as a measure of the “average quality” of my posts and comments.

                                1. 4

                                  I’d vote for median instead of mean, it is a better indicator if a user consistently makes upvoted contributions or if they just submitted a hugely popular post one time.

                                1. 2

                                  Works as intended for me on Intel Pentium and Xeons with FreeBSD.

                                  Feature request: also show frequencies (min, max, current).

                                  1. 1

                                    Both OpenBSD and FreeBSD’ sysctl(3) interface lack mib code to get frequencies. CPUID instruction can’t take effect. So I need to consider other methods, thanks for your feedback!

                                  1. 4

                                    I’d like to apologize for the rude question, but why not just use the command line all the time?

                                    1. 3

                                      Two examples: navigating logs to look at a lot of commit diffs, and doing partial commits (add -p) to straighten out the history. Both a lot easier with a GUI like gitx or even an editor-based UI like magit.

                                      For basic add-commit-pull-rebase-push, though, sure.

                                      1. 2

                                        For git add -p, there’s a very nice TUI interface called crecord (adapted from mercurial) that you might like: https://github.com/andrewshadura/git-crecord

                                        1. 1

                                          navigating logs to look at a lot of commit diffs

                                          This has to be the only thing I haven’t mastered to do comfortably yet with cli. On emergencies I resort to gitk.

                                          1. 1

                                            I often use tig for this on the cli, but as I don’t know too many commands, I sometimes fall back to gitg.

                                      1. 8

                                        Another GitHub aspect I dislike is that it turns into a “social coding” platform, where people “share much more than code”. It feels like a social network, and I do not want a git + facebook mix.

                                        1. 7

                                          Wow, I’ve not seen anything like it becoming facebookey. Do you have some examples on this?

                                          1. 13
                                            • automatic feed of what other users liked (on the home page while connected),
                                            • on-site notifications,
                                            • “like buttons” for projects (stars),
                                            • “react with emoji” buttons on comments,
                                            • emojis everywhere
                                            • rich user profile pages
                                            • follow users, projects

                                            It seems it only lacks the private messaging. There are already in-github-issue blogs.

                                            1. 13

                                              I actually like the stars, which I use for bookmarking. I regularly get the latest releases of starred repositories with a script.

                                              Not a fan of emojis though.

                                              1. 3

                                                Those darn subset of unicode!

                                                1. 1

                                                  Thank you, this is useful. :)

                                                2. 13

                                                  I consciously don’t reply to all, as much of it - IMHO - is very much up to taste.

                                                  automatic feed of what other users liked (on the home page while connected),

                                                  I know quite a few people using that for discovery.

                                                  on-site notifications,

                                                  I like them, because they don’t drop down my inbox. I use both them and the (really well implemented) emails.

                                                  “react with emoji” buttons on comments,

                                                  They are literally a wanted feature. Before having them, issues were full of people posting “+1”, “no”, etc., which trashed everyones email inbox.

                                                  It seems it only lacks the private messaging. There are already in-github-issue blogs.

                                                  Fun fact: they used to have that. It was killed off in… 2010something?

                                                  1. 3

                                                    much of it - IMHO - is very much up to taste

                                                    Yes. :-)

                                                    Most of these features happen to be convenient.

                                                    Maybe blurring the line with social networks is a side effect of trying to make collaboration better…

                                                    IIRC, they added emojis reaction to messages to prevent people putting “+1”-only messages to tell they are really eager to see a new feature implemented.

                                                    GitHub is a good answer to what people ask, and I am OK with what people ask for. I do not ask the same thing (just GIT server + gitweb or alike) but still have an account as I find all I need with GitHub, and it is required to comment on issues.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      It was killed off in… 2010something?

                                                      Pretty close: April 2012. No-one wanted another inbox to check.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        Ah, the fork queue… good old times.

                                                    2. 2

                                                      Those things don’t annoy me, I actually like to know if someone follows me, it’s good for my ego. I don’t have any crazy big projects though, may after a certain point the notifications become too frequent? I’m sure you can turn them off or ignore them though?

                                                      1. 2

                                                        turn them off or ignore them

                                                        Yes, exactly. So this is no big trouble fortunately. I can mostly ignore the platform and work as if I got commits through e-mail an a mailing list.

                                                1. 25

                                                  One big advantage of LaTeX (and other markup languages) the author misses: it’s plain text. In my experience, plain text makes collaborating much easier because it works nicely with version control, diffs, etc.

                                                  Also the ecosystem around LaTeX is great, I wouldn’t want to miss latexdiff and I’m not aware of anything like it for libreoffice documents.

                                                  Note, that I really hate some aspects of working with LaTeX, most of all the awful error messages.

                                                  1. 6

                                                    It’s not clear to me that the author misses that point. In fact, the author specifically calls it out:

                                                    LaTeX is a poor writing and editing medium because it is a poor reading medium, and it is a poor reading medium because it consists not of plain text but of plain text littered with bits of code such as \ldots and \parencite.

                                                    Then, later, the author specifically suggests Org-mode and Markdown (plain text formats that can export to LaTeX) as good alternatives.

                                                    1. 8

                                                      One big advantage of LaTeX (and other markup languages) the author misses: it’s plain text. In my experience, plain text makes collaborating much easier because it works nicely with version control, diffs, etc.

                                                      Counter-point: That’s because you’re only collaborating when using Unix tooling which, surprise, works best with plain text. When using say, Google Docs, or Word on SharePoint/OneDrive, the collaboration tools become much richer, with multiple cursors and such.

                                                      1. 21

                                                        Counter-counter-point: those tools are highly siloed and locked-down. A Google Docs user and a Office365 user cannot collaborate on anything. Plain text is a universal common demoninator, so LaTeX and collaboration therewith is accessible to users of Windows, Mac OS, Linux, Android/iOS (if you can actually manage to type anything on a godawful soft keyboard), BSD, MS-DOS, version 7 UNIX…

                                                        1. 13

                                                          Just piling on this…working on academic projects where the code and the papers live together, it’s very handy to have the same versioning system handling both. And LaTeX makes it much easier to call out to source code.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      Does frontend now universally mean web? (or at least webtechnologies?) I’m still somewhat surprised by that assertion.

                                                      1. 1

                                                        I don’t think it’s exclusive. I’m a web programmer so “frontend” for me generally means web.

                                                      1. 29

                                                        Arguably the only reason we’re getting self-driving cars is because we’ve gotten far enough in AI to be able to do training of neural nets and roadmapping quickly.

                                                        The only reason we could do that is because of the massively parallel and cheap processing power of GPUs.

                                                        And the reason we have cheap GPUs that are so good?

                                                        Twenty years ago, the market decided that it was important to help people blow up monsters on their computers.

                                                        Multics was a big project to do “useful things with software”, Unix was a couple of dudes goofing around on a PDP-7, and Linux was a crank Finn basically trolling his OS professor by writing yet-another ’nix clone.

                                                        Moot made 4chan while on SA to make an American Futaba.

                                                        These really important things weren’t centrally planned, they weren’t intended to be “useful”, they were just labors of love and whimsy.

                                                        I can only support foppery and whim when doing things with software.

                                                        1. 17

                                                          I’m not sure if 4chan belongs in that list.

                                                          1. 10

                                                            I said it was important, not that it was good.

                                                            Besides, do you have any idea how much Linux learning is a direct result of, say, stupid threads on /g/ over the years? How many people have tried woodworking after hanging out on /diy/? How many game systems and stories started off in /tg/, in turn giving solace and amusement to thousands?

                                                            And that’s without even going into the political or cultural stuff.

                                                            1. 9

                                                              Hah, I would agree it’s a “one of these things is not like the other”, but you can’t deny its importance and impact to today’s society. It was a dinky project he started in order to talk with his friends about anime, and it evolved to something so huge, for better or worse. I’d argue 4chan was one of the driving forces that made memes so popular and mainstream.

                                                            2. 6

                                                              Not to detract too far from your point, but regarding:

                                                              Arguably the only reason we’re getting self-driving cars is because we’ve gotten far enough in AI to be able to do training of neural nets and roadmapping quickly.

                                                              Apple’s pulled out. Maybe. And über needed to steal someone’s research. Maybe.

                                                              Perhaps the only reason we’re getting self-driving cars is because Google fleeced advertisers for years – perhaps unwittingly as a company, but at least some people inside the firm definitely knowingly and fraudulently.

                                                              Digital Advertising is a kind of bubble, and while some people thought the ride would never end, others clearly have been investing in infrastructure.

                                                              I don’t have a problem with that: Convincing advertisers to fund infrastructure in exchange for product placement is probably the best we can do we just need to make sure there’s enough people taking the right kind of advantage of the opportunity that things like adtech are really offering.

                                                              I think there are other bubbles where we can bleed-off infrastructure improvements: Gaming might be one too.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                Given the insane working conditions at the big game companies, I’m not sure I’d describe them as involving “foppery or whim”. Still, I can’t argue with idea that doing things for fun is worthwhile.

                                                                But the unexpected side-effect argument can be broadened, as others have said, e.g. much of distributed systems infrastructure we have today is built on ideas that came out of Google and their massive data processing needs.

                                                                I still think working directly on things you think are useful is probably better way to achieve something useful, rather than hoping for side effects.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Arguably the only reason we’re getting self-driving cars is because we’ve gotten far enough in AI to be able to do training of neural nets and roadmapping quickly.

                                                                  I think it more accurate to say we’re getting self-driving cars because of the huge potential profits that could be realized from the undertaking, not specifically because of advances in AI.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Has anyone here ever used/contributed to it?

                                                                  For me it the answer is no and no, while I read about it once or twice, probably when it was introduced, I totally forgot about it afterwards and never even visited it by accident.

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    Sounds like a lot of work to update your book to a non-turing complete language…

                                                                    1. 5

                                                                      It’s strange for me to get a professional audio and at the same time settle for an integrated GPU.

                                                                      A tape for backups is a nice idea. I have to check it out, because it seems really cheap.

                                                                      1. 19

                                                                        They don’t have a GPU at all.

                                                                        There’s lots of strange choices here:

                                                                        • Gigantic gaming case
                                                                        • Even back in England a UPS would be pretty useless
                                                                        • Xeon but no ECC
                                                                        • I’m not convinced NVMe drives are practical yet - most software is not built for such fast disks which just moves the bottleneck to decompression. In particular, games are made primarily for consoles, and PS4/xbone come with HDDs
                                                                        • A DAC that’s probably worse than the one on the mobo
                                                                        • A hardware mixer for no reason
                                                                        • Expensive video input and microphone
                                                                        • No Noctua fans :)
                                                                        1. 12
                                                                          • 1080P monitor! While I personally love multimonitor setups, I get the author’s objection, but you can do so much better than the U2417HJ. Dell’s P2715Q is 4K, edit: 60Hz, IPS, 27 inch, rotates to portrait for those long source files, and is reasonably priced.
                                                                          1. 11
                                                                            • UPSes are never useless; every storage medium everywhere prefers a steady stream of clean power to an abrupt spiked shutoff. Always have a UPS on desktop machines (or carry it around yourself in the form of a laptop).
                                                                            • it turns out that games (and everything else) are bottlenecked by bandwidth and latency from the file system; SSDs, and NVMe in particular, are the best investment you can make for any computing purpose in 2017
                                                                            • almost any external DAC is going to be better than the one on the motherboard, because motherboards are a boiling stew of high frequency, erratic electrical signals and high power lines
                                                                            1. 3

                                                                              almost any external DAC is going to be better than the one on the motherboard, because motherboards are a boiling stew of high frequency, erratic electrical signals and high power lines

                                                                              Better perhaps, but does it make a difference in practice? I remember when the cheap integrated audio 15 years ago would whine loud whenever you move the mouse or stress the CPU. I think we have improved a lot since then. The noise rejecting circuits in modern op-amps can be pretty darn nice, and I think they might be using some shielding too. On my new board, the audio chip is stashed away in the lower left corner, pretty much as far away from everything as you can get.

                                                                              I can hear my mouse and SSDs whine, and my monitor buzz, but there is no sign of such noise on the audio output, which is connected to an external six channel phone amp, with sennheiser hd 650, hd 800, akg k701 and k812.

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                I get buzz and whine on my onboard DAC; I suspect it’s down to how much a particular motherboard company cares. Interesting to hear that decent onboard DAC is possible, though. Who’s your vendor?

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  My new board is some ASUS Crosshair whatever, AM4, for the Ryzen CPUs. That said, I’ve been using Shuttle mini PCs for a few years now (DS437 and DS57U7) and the output sounds ok to me. I don’t recall having noisy outputs on my laptops either (ASUS and Lenovo).

                                                                              2. 2

                                                                                Yeah, UPS’s wouldve helped me during numerous power outages and distortions back whdn I thought they were unnecessary. I always recommend them. Especially given problems tend to happen at worst moment.

                                                                              3. 5

                                                                                I do zero gaming, no bitcoin mining, and mostly use boring apps and the command line, so a GPU didn’t seem useful for me. But willing to change my mind if you think I’m wrong there.

                                                                                The case is actually smaller than it looks in the picture, it’s a “mini tower” that fits the Micro-ATX mobo form factor.

                                                                                The crazy audio stuff was presented a little bit out of context, I want to use my computer in conjunction with a cd player and ham radio, and possibly GSM phone bridge, and mix them all together.

                                                                                Nice fan suggestion.

                                                                                1. 7

                                                                                  This set up will not work. The integrated graphics capabilities of that mobo relies on the processor having an integrated graphics chipset. Which yours does not. Alot of the choices for this build do not make much sense. If you haven’t purchased this yet I’d highly suggest rethinking your hardware/software choices as they really don’t line up with an optimal-developer machine.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    Nope, haven’t bought anything yet. Can you suggest what hardware might be better?

                                                                                    1. 12

                                                                                      There are a couple oddities. The choice of a Xeon processor is odd because none of the typical features are being used. Reasons to get a Xeon: ECC ram, multiprocessor/dual socket mobo, getting an 8+ core intel proc, or running a dedicated server. If you aren’t utilizing these get a consumer grade i7 as you’re paying extra for features you aren’t using. If you are adamant on not getting a dedicated gpu, make sure the processor you’re getting as an integrated GPU as they sit on-core not on the mobo. I’d suggest an Iris pro capable processor if you want a more capable one or a 7700k. 1080p is pretty dated at this point, a 4k ips 60hz monitor would be better. For your external PSU, I’d suggest an APC as they have better support and typically are more reliable. The case is a bit expensive for what it is, there are cheaper/better/same looking cases out there. For the ram I’d look at a set with 14 ns for cas lat. I don’t really understand what you’re going for with the mic/mixer/cam setup. I’d get a c920 webcam + an o2 odac and what ever pair of audiophile headphones you want. I’m pretty sure you can grab a cheap sdr scanner off ebay for 20ish bucks. Tape back up is kind of odd, personally I’d go with an on prem NAS/ bluray discs for cold storage. Generating and storing secret keys… I wouldn’t worry that much about that. Most companies don’t even put that much effort into key storage. It’s odd that so much effort was put into getting a minimal desktop set up but that the base system is Debian … It would be easier to do an arch install and add what you need.

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        This is great, concrete advice, thanks. One question: for the ECC memory would you recommend registered or unregistered?

                                                                                      2. 3

                                                                                        well, what exactly are you trying to do? What are your ‘boring apps’ and what do you do on the command line? The answer is going to be very different between a video/music editor (which you’re sort of seeming to want to set up like?) and a distributed systems researcher, or between either of those things and an enterprise java coder.

                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                          Build Haskell apps (lots of compiling), edit videos, use software defined radio, have people connect remotely for pair programming. Then mostly a bunch of low intensity tasks like writing and email.

                                                                                          1. 4

                                                                                            You could probably save a great deal of money and time by buying a cheap prebuilt or a laptop, then. That’s squarely in the common case. Something like the Dell XPS13 laptop is famous and widespread enough that linux works quite well, there’s a tremendous amount of community support, and you get a UPS, video, and portability ‘for free’.

                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                              Check out Field Programmable, RF Arrays if you’re into SDR. They’re cool.

                                                                                              1. 2

                                                                                                Several good, open-hardware designs on crowdsupply: https://www.crowdsupply.com/search?q=sdr

                                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                                  Good to see one was funded that…

                                                                                                  https://www.crowdsupply.com/lime-micro/limesdr

                                                                                                  …comes straight from FPRF inventor who have EE expertise to deliver it. Might help with prototyping mesh, radio networks.

                                                                                      3. 4

                                                                                        If I’m not mistaken, you won’t get any image on that monitor, the Xeon 1240 has no integrated GPU and I don’t think that motherboard has one either, even though the page you linked made it sound like it has one. The Xeon 1245 would get you an integrated GPU though.

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          A GPU is starting to make sense even if you only use the web browser as it will take advantage of it to more quickly render webpages.

                                                                                      4. 2

                                                                                        Not sure how good audio board support is across operating systems, but video driver support is definitly on the weak side. If you want to start experimenting with different os you might want to skip the video card.

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        Quite a bit simpler than the equivalent instructions for FreeBSD I’ve seen floating around.

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                                                                                          I haven’t seen any instructions recently, but from a recently-ish install of FreeBSD 11 I remember it took even less steps, e.g., no need to set up a package repository, there is a graphical wifi selector.

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                                                                                            For comparison, the FreeBSD guide I’m talking about.

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                                                                                              Leave no feature unused!

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                                                                                          I tried fish shell for some time and really wanted to like it. In the end, I went back to (my tweaked out) zsh for several reasons:

                                                                                          • while fish’s defaults are much nicer than zsh’s, I still needed to configure a lot of things to my liking
                                                                                          • autocompletion doesn’t work for functions/aliases, e. g., I have gl as a function/alias for git pull, and then fish cannot autocomplete, abbreviations work, but I that irritates me
                                                                                          • history search doesn’t work as I expect, if I type the beginning of a command I have typed before, fish lets me autocomplete it (ctrl f), but skips it when pressing arrow up (I have patched that behavior out, but having to install my own fork on every new computer I use is too tedious for me)

                                                                                          I still recommend fish to people who don’t use the shell much anyway, and have a much better experience with default fish than default bash or zsh.

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                                                                                            So you made an alias gl and that is so long you need to autocomplete it? or am i missing something?

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                                                                                              You’re missing that git pull takes options, a repository, and a refspec.

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                                                                                                This. Fish does complete gl itself just fine, just not git pull’s arguments.

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                                                                                                I think they mean the options to git pull, which is the command gl calls.

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                                                                                                In particular, I’ve found this zsh plugin to work very well for history search in my setup.

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                                                                                                  No fzf for you? I love it.

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                                                                                                Oh, I’m a gonna love Jedi completion. I hate having to assign a dummy variable to a list/dict element just for auto completion.

                                                                                                Also:

                                                                                                The size of the IPython codebase has decreased by about 1500 lines of Python code relative to the last release. Of course, that’s not solely due to the removal of Python 2 support, but a non-negligible amount is. And this reduction is even more remarkable in light of completely new features that required adding hundreds of lines of code. A large number of conditionals are gone, making the code more straightforward, easier to read, and simpler to maintain. Across the codebase we saw improvements in code compactness just from removing utility functions that existed only to provide identical behavior across Python 2 and Python 3. Even then, parts of the codebase remain affected by “Python 2 code”, so the potential gains are even greater. We will continue our quest to remove things as we go, and, as usual, contributions are welcome.

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                                                                                                  Fully agree, great feature!

                                                                                                  Now only pdb++ needs to support that or ipdb needs to work in pytest (if ipdb has the jedi completion build in already).

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                                                                                                  I’ve been using qutebrowser occasionally and can recommend it, the only thing that makes me come back to a more and more buggy vimperator is uMatrix and, ironically, mouse gestures.

                                                                                                  Even though I’m not really interested in the new configuration system, I’ll pledge when I’m home to keep up the momentum of the project.

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                                                                                                    uMatrix (see the related issue) is something I plan to tackle once there’s a plugin API. It’s definitely something I want too, I have it installed in Chromium (but rarely use Chromium). The new config is a first step in that direction, which will at least allow to block e.g. javascript for a given domain.

                                                                                                    Mouse gestures would probably be possible to do as a plugin as well then, but I’m not going to be the one to write that plugin :D

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                                                                                                    Two caveats I’d add to that graph, “Median Hours to Solve Problem” is…..

                                                                                                    • That should be “solve problem correctly”.
                                                                                                    • Most problems are problems with existing code (bugs, enhancements etc.)

                                                                                                    So Perl wins “Median Hours to Solve Problem”

                                                                                                    Having programmed in Perl, Ruby and D… I suspect Perl loses with my caveats… and D, as the library ecosystem matures, is starting to win.

                                                                                                    And interestingly enough quite often wins in terms of speed too.

                                                                                                    ie. Programmer productivity and speed are trade-offs you have to make.

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                                                                                                      I’d argue a solution isn’t a solution if it’s incorrect.

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                                                                                                        Oh I agree with you…..

                                                                                                        ….the rest of the software industry doesn’t.

                                                                                                        But personally, I agree.

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                                                                                                        So Perl wins “Median Hours to Solve Problem”

                                                                                                        Wait, what? That goes to Common LISP. Almost all the benefits I learned about PERL over two decades ago when I tried it were already in LISP’s. The ecosystem benefit still isn’t there outside Clojure. The good LISP’s have FFI’s, though. :)