1. -3

    the biggest thing since bitcoin

    Meaning, “fails at its primary (only) purpose and only useful for running Ponzi schemes, while accelerating climate change?”

    I haven’t read the article; the headline turned me off already.

    1. 4

      You might want to actually give it a shot. Take it from someone who hates these headlines too.

      1. 0

        I’ve read some (what I think will be) more nuanced posts on GPT-3. I guess it’s interesting, but I’m not really invested enough to have formed an opinion on this one (yet).

        1. 8

          No seriously, read the article.

          1. 11

            This article is a great litmus test for people who ignore or flag things based on the headline.

      2. 3

        How does Bitcoin fail at being a peer-to-peer electronic cash system?

        1. 1

          It’s too slow to replace cash. People do the bulk of the transactions off-chain, which kinda defeats the purpose.

          1. 3

            Your main criticism is “it’s too slow”? All digital money is slow. It only looks fast because banks take on the risk of digital money transfers and give you the benefit of the doubt. For “digital cash”, I’d say 10 minutes is pretty good.

            1. 4

              banks take on the risk of digital money transfers and give you the benefit of the doubt

              That’s kind of a killer feature, though.

              1. 3

                If you desperately need that kind of thing, yes. Bitcoin provides benefits traditional money and banking doesn’t, hence it’s existence. There is nothing preventing banking solutions on top of Bitcoin.

                1. 2

                  The primary benefits of Bitcoon are lack of regulation and high volatility due to same, and a secondary benefit of being distributed with no bias towards societal economic utility for the people getting lucky while mining.

              2. 1

                You just got done comparing it to cash, not debit or credit card transactions. Cash is instantaneous. Credit cards have fraud detection, which Bitcoin lacks.

                1. 2

                  How is cash instantaneous acorss the ocean?

                  1. 1

                    I’m not sure why I need to say this but transporting money is not the same as exchanging it

                2. 1

                  Most bank transfers days 2 days anyway

          1. 2

            Yeah, it’s actually way more complicated than you’d imagine due to the filesystem change.

            I’ve written this article for exactly one reason: When I started this task, there was zero information about how to go about this. So this article is what I wished I had available but hadn’t. I’m a bit hesitant posting this here, since it’s so extremely niche (and it only gets more niche with time given the age of OpenWrt 15), but I hope that at least one person stumbling upon it will find it helpful.

            1. 2

              That’s exactly why you should post it. Thank you for documenting it!

            1. 13

              I really appreciate what Netsurf have accomplished: It’s nearly sufficient for my day-to-day browsing. But I do miss my userscripts, extensions, and most of all vi-style keybindings.


              sent from netsurf 3.10, btw :)

              1. 1

                I really wish I could give it try but last time I used it you couldn’t even switch tabs with the keyboard. Have they added keyboard support in recent releases?

                1. 15

                  Hi, thanks for trying our little browser. I did rework the GTK frontend for this release but there may still be missing some keyboard navigation shortcuts.

                  Always happy to receive feature requests in the https://bugs.netsurf-browser.org tracker

                  Please do remember there are only a handful of us developing the browser for seven toolkits across eleven operating systems (https://ci.netsurf-browser.org/jenkins/view/Categorized/job/netsurf/) so if we do not get to it quickly it is not we are not interested, just stretched a bit thin.

                  1. 1

                    Thanks; I’ll give the new version a look. It’s a shame it’s written in C because I might be interested in contributing otherwise. Anyway I wish you the best of luck.

                    1. 9

                      A shame? I think that’s part of the appeal.

                      1. 7

                        Why is it a shame?

                        For C++ and Rust, there’s established browser projects. This one is in C.

                        1. 2

                          I did apt install netsurf on Ubuntu 20.04 and tried to browse a bunch of my old-school sites (nothing fancy by modern standards: https, basic HTTP auth, some redirects here and there: gitea, static pages, etc) and netsurf segfaults on more pages than it is able to open.

                          The authors did great job, but C is not really an option here.

                          1. 2

                            3.9 hasn’t segfaulted on me, not even once.

                            Arch packages.

                            I wouldn’t be surprised if Ubuntu’s packages were just stolen outright from Debian, and forced to run with incompatible linkages. I do not trust derivative distributions.

                          2. -1

                            It’s very difficult to trust a project written in an unsafe language that exists primary to view untrusted content, even when it has millions of dollars behind it. When the only contribution comes from unpaid enthusiasts it’s even more troubling. I can understand a huge company like Google or Microsoft erring on the side of conservative technology but if you’re a ragtag band going up against Goliath you’ve got to make better choices to have a chance at keeping up.

                            Also I just don’t have that much free time, and I prefer to spend it coding in enjoyable languages. I wouldn’t code without a repl unless I was getting paid quite a lot.

                            Edit: not to show any disrespect; I’m just giving my reasons for declining to contribute personally.

                            1. 3

                              The problem is there’s little else that’s widely available (particularly on the marginalized platforms that NetSurf courts) that’s as portable (for better or for worse, we live in Unix and C’s shadow) and performant. Not even Ada (as sibling comment says) can be trusted to be available.

                              1. 4

                                Also include the fact that they target RiscOS, Amiga, Haiku, etc and you’re even more limited, without doing some yak shaving to get language support.

                                That all being said, the project is relatively small. An ambitious programmer with some free time could port it all to Rust, or D, or whatever other safe language for their platform of choice. And, since it’s already C, they could do it incrementally and have a working browser the whole time. Not saying that anyone should, mind you, but it would be pretty neat. :)

                              2. 4

                                It’s very difficult to trust a project written in an unsafe language that exists primary to view untrusted content

                                People do more insane things, like using systems affected by the confused deputy problem, when seL4 exists.

                                I frankly can’t blame netsurf for using a language that’s old, lightweight, well-understood and available for the platforms they target over, say, some immature experimental language that’s barely 5 years old and has very little in terms of successful projects made with it to show.

                                Also I just don’t have that much free time, and I prefer to spend it coding in enjoyable languages. I wouldn’t code without a repl unless I was getting paid quite a lot.

                                You’re right in doing whatever you want with your time, yet nobody has asked you to contribute, either.

                                1. 2

                                  There’s a lighteight, widely supported, safe, and proven language. It’s called Ada. It’s also a part of GCC.

                                  1. 4

                                    Sure. If you want to write a browser in Ada, be my guest. But you’re surely not living in a bubble where you don’t know which language the parent was all about. It isn’t Ada, and there’s already a browser utilizing it, albeit only partially.

                                    Personally, I find the real problem to be the browser acting as TCB. The web standards have got so complex it is impossible in practice to write a safe browser.

                                    On a good design, exploiting a browser should yield no benefit. I would focus on that. Capabilities (such as implemented by seL4, the whitepaper of which is linked above) are a good building block to achieve that.

                    1. 10

                      Sadly, it doesn’t work in combination with my favourite Firefox trick: putting stylesheets in HTTP Link headers. Why do that? because you can style non-html content, like so:

                      nc -l 8080 <<EOF
                      HTTP/1.1 200 Meh, it's OK, I guess
                      content-type: text/plain
                      link: <https://unpkg.com/sakura.css@1.2.0/css/sakura-dark.css>; rel="stylesheet"
                      
                      hello, world!
                      EOF
                      
                      1. 3

                        I didn’t knew you could do that…

                        1. 1

                          Does that work for other browsers? Is this a way to syntax highlight without HTML?

                          1. 1

                            (sorry for the late reply, i’m not usually logged in and only look at the front page)

                            the blog post i read about this mentioned that the old opera (w/ presto engine) supported this as well. there are open bugs for webkit and blink, but neither are interested.

                            when you open a plain text document with firefox, it gets wrapped in a <pre> element, so that’s the only tag you get to interact with. css doesn’t have a feature to access individual words/characters (with the exception of :first-letter and :first-line), so that doesn’t (sadly) work. but you can at least give it some sensible margins, text size and a dark theme ;)

                        1. 5

                          I’ve written some games that use the VT220 mouse escape sequences: minesviiper and solvitaire (they also have vi-bindings, hence the names), so I think I have some experience.

                          The problem I see with using the mouse in a TUI is that there is no feedback from hovering, meaning what is clickable isn’t always obvious. The only place I sometimes use it is in ncmpcpp(1): you can right-click tracks to play, or click the “playing”/“paused” text (that doesn’t look clickable) to toggle playback. Also, not everything is accessible through the mouse (in ncmpcpp, or my games), so you still need to constantly reach for the arrow keys or other hotkeys.

                          For me at least, good vi-style keybindings are making me way more productive.

                          1. 1

                            Terminals that support reporting click events generally also support drag events and hover events, if you ask for them. On the other hand, ncurses only supports click events, so that’s all you get unless you want to roll your own input handling code.

                            1. 1

                              yeah, doesn’t sound like fun doing bespoke hitbox-detection on every mouse move, since there’s no curses support for it. :( given that you can move your mouse cursor over many cells per second, a “differential drawing mode” (like ncurses does) is probably wise, too. and that requires you to design your output routines carefully (i remember it being a pain to retrofit to minesviiper).

                          1. 2

                            “Important safety tip”, but I’m nervous that this is needed at all. “Pulling the plug on your Raspberry Pi before it safely shuts down… is a bad idea! This can result in a corrupt microSD card and file system.” So Raspbian doesn’t use a durable enough filesystem that isn’t corruptible on power failures? 😬

                            1. 2

                              I’d recommend seeing Files by Dan Luu talk. But I probably wouldn’t trust the SD card to handle it properly either.

                              That being said, I use my RPi as a playground for things, so I fearlessly pull the plug 😄

                              1. 2

                                The filesystem on my Rpi is ext4 according to /etc/fstab. I honestly don’t know how resistant that FS is to sudden power interrupts. I’ve been religious about running shutdown -h ever since I installed Debian from floppies on a 386…

                                Edit I’ve read up a bit now (this article was a good resource) and I figure that ext4 should handle power being cut. But the root filesystem is usually a micro-SD card, and who knows how good the “connection” is there.

                                Not to mention there’s a lot of cargo-culting around best practices for the Raspberry Pi… and the linked article wants to sell a hardware project.

                                1. 2

                                  At $work, we use RPis for bespoke monitoring systems (aircon, refridgerators, doors, …) and initially went with the cheap microSD cards that shipped with the 3rd party kits we bought. They all died within the first year of operation (without being subjected to power outages). I suspect that those having problems with corrupted sdcards are in many cases just using cheap cards that would’ve died anyways, and power cuts just increase the chances of sdcard corruption.

                                  1. 1

                                    Thanks for the input! The card I got in my kit was branded “SanDisk” (who knows if it’s genuine though). What card or alternatives are you using now?

                                    1. 3

                                      I don’t remember off-hand (we hadn’t had a single failure in years), but the ones we’re using now are “industrial”/“surveilance camera grade”. the packaging from “Transcend High Endurance” cards look familiar, but no guarantees ;)

                                1. 2

                                  It’s interesting that one of the “blocker bugs” are the missing backgrounds.

                                  I submitted a photo from a trip a few years ago for the supplemental wallpaper to be included with the 32 release and I can see that the voting process is open until end of the month so let’s see what happens! :)

                                  1. 2

                                    Cool. Add the poll link here.

                                    1. 1

                                      The poll is here (my photo is the Calming Sunset one) https://apps.fedoraproject.org/nuancier/elections/

                                      1. 4

                                        Since this link requires logging in (an possibly being a fedora contributor): this is markosaric’s photo: https://apps.fedoraproject.org/nuancier/pictures/fedora_32/markosaric-DSC_0196_2.JPG

                                        1. 1

                                          Just made it my background and immediately removed it. Why? Because it’s slightly off kilter, driving me crazy. The horizon needs to be level.

                                    2. 2

                                      Where does one submit these things? Asking for a friend 😁

                                      1. 2

                                        The submission period is closed now and the voting is ongoing. The website is here https://apps.fedoraproject.org/nuancier/

                                    1. 18

                                      I’ve preordered it back in … jeez, 2017? What makes the Librem5 a major improvement (imo, of course) in comparison to Android or iOS is that it is actually free software and hackable. Those security features (someone called it security-LARPing recently–I think that fits here) always felt like they are to generate more press around it, and looking at how it was covered in the relevant media, it worked.

                                      1. 4

                                        I sadly had to refund my order a few months ago to pay for repairs on my car :(

                                        1. 1

                                          I’ve preordered it back in … jeez, 2017?

                                          Same here. That’s a long time ago. I hope to receive it sometime this year.

                                        1. 13

                                          While not removing YouTube, you could point out that all YouTube channels actually come with RSS feeds. As far as maintaining subscriptions, you can effectively do this and have a logged-in YouTube experience without needing an actual account :)

                                          1. 4

                                            That’s nice to know, how can you access it?

                                            If you combine this with youtube-dl, you get an ad-free, tracking-free experience without ever having to open up a web browser!

                                            1. 6

                                              Also MPV is very good at streaming youtube videos.

                                              1. 6

                                                put this feed into your rss reader: https://www.youtube.com/feeds/videos.xml?channel_id=$channel_id

                                                There’s also a special URL that works with pubsubhubbub/websub: "https://www.youtube.com/xml/feeds/videos.xml?channel_id=$channel_id" (websub endpoint is https://pubsubhubbub.appspot.com/subscribe).

                                                if you replace the string videos with playlist, these URLs also let you “subscribe” to playlists, IIRC.

                                                Also note that the websub feed will also push updates to existing entries (e.g. updated description/title/thumbnail) to you. i’m filtering these by <updated> - <published> <= 60 seconds, which seems to work OK.

                                                1. 3

                                                  If you use Android, you can try NewPipe, an open source frontend for Youtube, with more features (you can download videos, subscribe to channels’ feed rss and more).

                                                  1. 1

                                                    I really with NewPipe was available for iOS. 😞

                                                2. 1

                                                  That’s a great point, I’ll add that to the article. I’ve actually done that in the past, but I always like to see what the YT algorithm has come with on the home page too.

                                                1. 8

                                                  git-bug is an issue tracker using git as database. It’s not a general purpose database, but it has a great document explaining how it stores the data without having to deal with merge conflicts. Maybe you’ll find this document useful.

                                                  1. 4

                                                    very similar: git-dit:

                                                    Git-dit stores issues and associated data directly in commits rather than in blobs within the tree. Similar to threads in a mailing list, issues and comments are modeled as a tree of messages. Each message is stored in one commit.

                                                  1. 7

                                                    Since I’m from a place where English isn’t the main language to communicate in (Austria), many of our jargon isn’t English either: my favourite is (eini-)pfriemeln, a dialect word originally meaning to forcefully push an object through a slightly undersized hole. In our context it means to insert additional rows or columns into a database or system, sometimes even to bodge together a software fix, in a not-100%-satisfactory way.

                                                    Anyone else have other non-English jargon?

                                                    1. 4

                                                      Anyone else have other non-English jargon?

                                                      In a German punny reference to “chips” I like to call RAM units “Knusperriegel”, albeit it’s probably not healthy to eat them.

                                                      1. 5

                                                        I believe Germans (at least some of them), call “dip switches” by the delightful name of “maus klaviers”. (Mouse Pianos)

                                                      2. 1

                                                        I use “frickeln” for “coding in a quick and dirty way”.

                                                      1. 5

                                                        I really don’t understand why disabling JavaScript is met with such hostility by some people. It doesn’t break sites that much (and one can always enable it for specific sites) and in a lot of situations it makes the web browsing experience objectively better!

                                                        1. 4

                                                          I have uMatrix set up so I run 1st party Javascript. Still, I daily encounter websites where this permissiveness results in a completely broken website with blank page. I don’t mind wasting time tweaking settings, using multiple browsers etc. to get to what I need with minimal leakage, but I’m also sure most people would find my behaviour, completely reasonably, unreasonable if not crazy.

                                                          Fashionable web frontend development these days takes Javascript presence for granted. I talked to a bunch of candidates for a developer position recently and not one of the self-identifying front-end developers envisioned building a service without using Javascript as their main tool. JSX and CSS-in-JS are how you sprinkle what used to be foundations into JS, where “the truth” lies. Using Javascript for development of course doesn’t require Javascript to display content, but it’s not exactly surprising that those who already invested themselves in using it as their primary tool generally don’t see a problem of requiring it of others.

                                                          Which is a long way of me saying that hostility is coming from fewer websites working well without it AND too many developers seeing this pushback as a capricious infliction on their work.

                                                          1. 2

                                                            and if some site (i regularly visit) does break, I’m usually writing a small user script for it. mostly, it’s just a few lines: un-lazy-loading images, removing large sticky elements, or in the case of Big Goog’, rewriting outgoing URLs to not track clicks. Though I have to admit that I haven’t yet found a satisfying solution to javascript-based onmouseover menus (on sites I don’t intend to visit often/again), except futzing with the devtools element inspector.

                                                          1. 16

                                                            One thing not considered: what if the cost of content marketing was raised? A ban on medium.com has been discussed before, and that site has become remarkably user-hostile.

                                                            1. 11

                                                              Full support of just banning medium.com or adding a “Medium.com” downvote flag

                                                              1. 4

                                                                Or at the very least adding a ‘medium.com’ tag that folks can use to exclude that garbage from showing on their front pages.

                                                                1. 2

                                                                  The ability to filter out specific domains would be a more general solution, I think.

                                                              2. 7

                                                                This has come up a bunch of times in this thread and the chat room today, almost always serious (I think). We can query the domain medium.com trivially, but not the aliases like, uh blog.loadmill.com. Would someone like to write a Ruby script to loop our domains table and detect them? (You don’t have to write a migration to store this in the database, let’s start with diagnosis.) I don’t know if they’ll all be CNAMEs, As, CloudFlare, or what, so there’s a bit of research to be done here. With such a script we could write queries to find out if Medium is typically the bad stuff and decide if we’d be better off with out it.

                                                                1. 5

                                                                  (not sure if a blanket ban on medium.com is good or bad, but that said:)

                                                                  I couldn’t find any DNS fingerprints (no cname or txt records; a points to AWS). looks like medium blogs send a link: rel=humans HTTP header on all HTTPS pages, though:

                                                                  ~ %  curl -sI https://blog.loadmill.com|grep humans
                                                                  link: <https://medium.com/humans.txt>; rel="humans"
                                                                  

                                                                  here’s it as a oneliner applied to the query you’ve posted (it’s slow, mainly due to non-responding servers):

                                                                  ~ % curl -s https://gist.githubusercontent.com/pushcx/4cd41b0a935ed11e110d5ee2df7b4428/raw/448aa84b1cd0b7f90d6000d99fc1dcdd34545d30/query.txt|grep '^|' |cut -f2 -d' '|while read domain; do curl -skIm10 https://$domain|grep -Fq medium.com/humans.txt && echo $domain; done
                                                                  blog.grandstack.io
                                                                  blog.learngoprogramming.com
                                                                  blog.minio.io
                                                                  notamonadtutorial.com
                                                                  blog.getambassador.io
                                                                  blog.softwaremill.com
                                                                  blog.bitsrc.io
                                                                  blog.0day.rocks
                                                                  mondaynote.com
                                                                  blog.esciencecenter.nl
                                                                  itnext.io
                                                                  blog.plan99.net
                                                                  

                                                                  They also 302-redirect through https://medium.com/m/global-identity?redirectUrl= (probably to track logged in users) when not issuing a HEAD request.


                                                                  i do like the ‘exclude personal home pages from the majority domain ban’ idea.

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    Thanks for finding a signal. I adapted this to check all 19k+ domains that have been submitted to Lobsters; here’s the list of the 193 hosted by Medium. (Caveat: they’re Medium now and may not have been years ago when the site was submitted, and vice-versa).

                                                                    $ time (touch medium.txt; mysql lobsters -e "select domain from domains" | xargs -P 20 -i% bash -c "curl -skIm10 https://% | grep -Fq medium.com/humans.txt && echo % >> medium.txt")
                                                                    
                                                                    real    15m48.738s
                                                                    user    7m30.633s
                                                                    sys     2m38.201s
                                                                    
                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      193 out of 19k+ domains doesn’t sound all that much to be honest. If banning only Medium would drop the amount of low quality content dramatically, then the few domains hosted by Medium does not sound like a large issue. If they are, one could discuss a solution for that at a later date.

                                                                      Even if a ban on Medium is too aggressive, then a tag for Medium could be a solution. Even a tag that lowers the score like the meta tags for example. That would at least discourage blog spam through them as the visibility would be limited somewhat more.

                                                                  2. 4

                                                                    Previous objections have been of the form “medium.com is user-hostile”. My suggestion this time is of a stronger form: if X.com is employing marketers that are taking hostile actions against the community, then is banning X.com enough to make it unattractive to employ marketers?

                                                                    I’m not sure if that’s true, and I guess my post was about 70/30 snark/serious. It might not be good for multi-tenanted domains to get the banhammer because one guy hired some marketroids.

                                                                    I don’t know if I will have a chance to get to writing your diagnostic script, so I’m afraid I can’t promise it for you.

                                                                1. 7

                                                                  Whenever I see a github bugtracker with half a dozen labels on each issue, I can’t help but think that they’ve reinvented Bugzilla’s Components, Bug states and resolutions, Flags, …

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    There are a bunch of obvious useful features missing from github’s issues. GitLab is a bit better and supports sorting by priority at least.

                                                                    It also allows you to define labels at the organisation rather than project level, which is potentially useful.

                                                                    1. 3

                                                                      I have said it before, but for what it is worth: I recommend using actual bug tracking software. Github is a source code repository hosting site. Separation of concerns and all that.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        Github issues are fine for small projects with simple and informal workflows, but I think if you need even a single label, then you need a real bugtracker.

                                                                        Generally, if you find yourself implementing an ad hoc, unenforceable process, it may be time to look for tools that already implement it or allow implementing it in a machine-enforceable fashion.

                                                                        “Beginner-friendly” and similar may be an exception, since they have no effect on the process and are only there to help new contributors pick things to work on.

                                                                  1. 4

                                                                    At $work we use them to monitor everything from datacentre AC units and live streams to medical refridgerators over SNMP.

                                                                    1. 7

                                                                      Not self-hosting is a mistake and helps centralization.

                                                                      1. 20

                                                                        on the other hand, their hoster is (afaict) the main developer of matrix itself. so this means a stable amount of money will be available for matrix development.

                                                                        1. 9

                                                                          …and increases expenses and operational overhead. I have a lot of qualms with Matrix (particularly how much overhead it has), but this at least means they have the choice to self-host later, should they choose.

                                                                          1. 6

                                                                            Considering the many other mistakes they were seriously considering making which would have been dramatically more harmful, this seems like an overly-critical nitpick, even if it’s technically true.

                                                                            1. 5

                                                                              Try to use another server (for example riot.privacytools.io) and DNS block vector.im, matrix.org, modular.im and all subdomains. The experience is half broken.

                                                                              1. 9

                                                                                Is this since we landed all the privacy work a few months ago? (cf https://matrix.org/blog/2019/09/27/privacy-improvements-in-synapse-1-4-and-riot-1-4/) There should categorically be NO dependencies on any of those domains or subdomains if you’re selfhosting (unless you use a widget or integration manager hosted there, but then you’re not self-hosting any more).

                                                                                1. 2

                                                                                  On riot?

                                                                                  I use riot with a self hosted server and the only thing I have to whitelist in umatrix is the domain of my server.

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    Still better than Discord.

                                                                                2. 1

                                                                                  I don’t think this is a problem, since it’s relatively easy for Mozilla as an organization to move to a different matrix hosting provider or start self-hosting if they ever have a problem with the hosting provided by the company developing matrix. This is no more problematic than Mozilla switching from one VPS provider to another for their build infrastructure.

                                                                                  1. 0

                                                                                    I think you underestimate how bad riot software is.

                                                                                1. 9

                                                                                  RFC 3676 is very widely implemented and solves this in the way you want. You’re either looking for that or looking to reinvent it.

                                                                                  I’m curious how you might get vim to insert/preserve those spaces, though.

                                                                                  1. 3

                                                                                    vimrc: autocmd FileType mail setlocal formatoptions+=aw
                                                                                    muttrc: set text_flowed=yes

                                                                                  1. 1

                                                                                    pretty small and no plugins. the most useful parts (that’s not too common) are

                                                                                    " block cursor in normal mode, bar cursor in insert mode, underline cursor in replace mode
                                                                                    let &t_SI = "\<Esc>[6 q"
                                                                                    let &t_SR = "\<Esc>[4 q"
                                                                                    let &t_EI = "\<Esc>[2 q"
                                                                                    
                                                                                    " less intrusive colorcolumn (-> youtu.be/aHm36-na4-4)
                                                                                    call matchadd('ColorColumn', '\%81v.', 100)
                                                                                    

                                                                                    set undofile and friends to persist the undo history across vim-restarts.

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      Pull request opened here. Thanks for all your input!

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        Wait, so, you just go ahead and ignore all the input? What’s the purpose of this pull request when there’s hardly any informed consensus against archive.is and in favour of archive.org here?

                                                                                      1. 11

                                                                                        I agree that DRM does not technically prevent copyright violations, but then again, it was never intended to, and treating its proponents as if they were too dumb stupid to know this is deeply misguided if you’re trying to make a persuasive argument. DRM is and always was an economic tool to make violating copyright law more expensive, particularly in concert with the increased availability of reasonably priced alternatives.

                                                                                        Too, at least in North America, you never owned your “content” – we have always been purchasing a non-exclusive license with various terms attached. Like this or not, it is not a recent invention of Big Content.

                                                                                        1. 6

                                                                                          Saying DRM isn’t so bad, as it just enforces the legal restrictions consumers are already bound to is just wrong. DRM is preventing you from exercising your rights, e.g. fair use in the USA or the right to a private copy (.de wiki) in parts of the EU.

                                                                                          1. 2

                                                                                            I’m not arguing for DRM – I’m just trying to explain why the OP’s stance (media people are too dumb to understand what we techies do) is getting the issue precisely backwards.

                                                                                          2. 4

                                                                                            Being able to purchase something for 100$ to break HDCP and make it ripe for digital copying really throws a monkey wrench into that argument tho.

                                                                                            How can it be an economic tool to make things more expensive when it’s incredibly cheap to defeat with a hardware device?

                                                                                            1. 5

                                                                                              Because there are zero people, to a first approximation, who are going to try and defeat HDCP. Yes, it only takes one person to do this and seed a torrent; but it’s not a binary win/lose – the harder things are to do, the more attractive the .99c download or $15/mo subscription becomes.