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    • Miniflux (RSS)
    • Jira (Kanban style project management (side projects, house renovation, etc.))
    • Gitea (Git)
    • Drone (CI)
    • NetData (System monitoring)
    • OpenVPN
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      Jira, as in Atlassian’s?

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        Yeah, you can buy a license for $10 and self-host it. it’s a bit of a memory hog running on the JVM though. Unfortunately the alternatives I tried didn’t quite fit my use-case for house renovation project management.

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      Although it’s simple enough to be added as an alias, I’d recommend using the function. The function re-evaluates date each time its run, while the alias only evaluates it when your bashrc or zshrc is evaluated.

      You can define your alias using single quotes and it’d have the same effect.

      alias lb='vim ~/logbook/$(date "+%Y-%m-%d").md'
      
      1. 27

        I was accepted to the Recurse Center and am arranging the logistics of moving to NYC from mid-September to mid-December. If anyone in NYC would like to meet up, message me. I plan to study category theory, dependent types, and, if I can find a study buddy, tools like Coq and TLA+.

        Codewise, I’m tinkering ahead on my current Haskell practice program, a solitaire solver. I’m also making demo Rails apps for my two factor authentication Rails gem.

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          Check out @hwayne’s tutorial on learntla.com since it’s on a practical subset. Also, Alloy Analyzer has long been used to do something similar for structural analysis of programs with ease of use vs Coq etc.

          http://learntla.com/

          http://alloy.mit.edu/alloy/

          Hopefully, you master it all. TLA+ and Alloy just knock out lots of low-hanging fruit with relatively few people quiting due to difficulty like what happens with big-time provers.

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            Great news, looking forward to the blog posts! Is there something similar to Recurse Center in Europe?

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              There was “Hacker Retreat” in Berlin that was explicitly inspired by Recurse Center, but it disappeared in October or November 2015. I’m not aware of others, but I haven’t looked.

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              Glad to have more RC people here. Enjoy!

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                This is wonderful news! Looking forward to hearing all about it :).

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                  Congrats again, we’re looking forward to having you :)

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                  Takes a while to get used to but this has helped me several times: https://github.com/adrieng/xrandr-nightmode I’m not running it every night though.

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                    • Learning Japanese
                    • Running (goal is to be able to run 100k races one day)
                    • Bouldering
                    • Reading (When In French at the moment)
                    • Code a bit, here and there
                    1. 2

                      At first I thought it’s a typo, 100k instead of 10k then I Googled and it seems to be a thing, and an impressive one on that.

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                        It is definitely a thing and I’m still as impressed as you! I’m sure it’s terrible for your body, but damn… It’s an amazing feat.

                        1. 2

                          I’d think it’s probably not all that terrible if you can do it with great form and/or minimal footwear. It definitely wears you out for a matter of weeks, but I’d guess it doesn’t have to be too damaging in the long run.

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                      Tehran, Iran.

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                        Elsewhere in this thread I was talking about how having Iranian internet probably blocked you off from many parts of the rest of the internet. I have also heard that a lot of Iranians know how to use proxies and VPNs. What is your experience?

                        1. 6

                          Yes, we’re well versed in bypassing them, mostly just an inconvenience. The real problem is limited bandwidth, which has been partly due to—recently lifted—sanctions.

                          1. 3

                            I worked on a project a few years ago, creating a system to organize artifacts and articles from the Qajar period. It was fascinating working with the clients (a Professor and her grad students) as they would go back and forth from Boston to Tehran, and how much more complicated it was working on the site w/ them while they were there. In Boston – skype calls, screenshares, they whole nine yards, in Tehran, I’d be lucky to get an email.

                            Not to mention the complicated an disheartening process of making sure all the icons on the site didn’t come across as too politically subversive.

                            All this to say, even my secondhand experience with the level of crap you have to deal with tells me “inconvenience” is an understatement. Here’s hoping the lift those restrictions someday soon.

                            1. 2

                              You’re right, but as I said the real problem is the capped bandwidth and the added latency—to an already slow connection—of solutions used to bypass the restrictions. Bypassing restrictions is the easy part, but actually using the produce, not so much: a very slow with high latency Internet connection. You should get used to waiting several minutes for GMail or Twitter’s web interfaces to become responsive.

                            2. 2

                              Is this every Iranian? It’s an open secret how to get around internet restrictions? Or just a few technically savvy people? Do grandpa and grandma know how to bypass internet blocks?

                              1. 2

                                You’re right and my judgment is, probably, clouded with selection bias; but I think most of the young generation know how to bypass it because the censorship has been part of the Internet since the day they’ve started using it. And they usually take care of their grandpa and grandmas.

                        1. 1

                          Honest question, I’m new to Haskell. I remember reading several comparisons of parser combinator libraries in Haskell and the general census has been use attoparsec when performance matters, and trifecta when error messages matter. I presume data (de)serialization is one of those areas that performance does matter?

                          1. 2

                            It’s a bit weird to me that it uses parsec. I would expect/want attoparsec here.

                            1. 1

                              I think it uses aeson for parsing json. It looks like it uses parsec for parsing the IDL.

                              1. 1

                                Oh! I see. It doesn’t have aeson listed as its own dep, but users would need one.

                          1. 4

                            From Twitter:

                            E-reader friendly now too!

                            What does this mean, exactly? Is there an extra non-margin PDF, or is there actually an epub version available now?

                            1. 4

                              I too hope to see an epub at a certain point. The ereader PDF has some code that overflows in the late chapters. It is much better for tablet reading however.

                              I’ve read this morning the Monad chapter and the functor/applicative/monad in the wild. They are really top class (as the rest of the book)! I look forward to buy also the paper version when it’s ready!

                              1. 3

                                I too hope to see an epub at a certain point.

                                We’ve tested an epub render, it mangled the content horribly. I’d rather just fix the PDF via the LaTeX.

                                Glad you’re liking it so far :)

                                1. 2

                                  Boo, epub would really be a lot nicer for reading on a tablet beside the laptop. Curious what got mangled.

                                  1. 3

                                    The e-reader version of the PDF I made vastly exceeded my expectations. I poked around it a fair bit on my kindle and it was very nice, IMO. Other readers that tested it on various devices gave it a thumbs up as well.

                                    epub on my kindle was horrendous and the gaping maw of labor required to fix it by hand isn’t going to happen. I’d have to charge a lot more for the book to cover that and people already complain about the $59.

                              2. 2

                                The former.

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                                  Ooh goody, I’ve been mostly reading it on my kobo so this is good. The book really has been great so far, things like the structure, you can find exercices sprinkled throughout the chapters instead of all globbed at the end, I usually have trouble getting into a books exercices because of this. They’re even little goodies at the end of chapters in the form of links to recommended extra reading.

                                1. 2

                                  I use http://www.fpx.de/fp/Software/Gorilla/, and its cross-platform.