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    At maidsafe we’ve switched from C/C++ for our entire code base (aside from some JS for the UI) two years back and we no regrets. We are building the SAFE Network, a privacy-first open source peer-to-peer storage and communication network. For that low level, complex networking and routing. For this area performance is matters (an earlier version was in Python), but doing a lot of highly sensitive crypto Rust offers a totally different degree of certainty of the programs compiled and portability and prevents us from doing an entire class of mistakes.

    Furhter more, as an underlying library the we are currently restructuring the system to compile native libraries for all major desktop and mobile platforms and through the FFI interface can easily integrate that library into a lot of language through minimal bindings (Python, Javascript, Java, etc..). Last, but not least, we even use Rust as the “mock” language within our RFCs because its type syntax is so expressive and nice to read that it is more precise to put in actual Structs and actual code than trying to describe what should happen. Neither of those would have been that easy to do wasn’t it for Rust and its amazing ecosystem and platform.

    We are also looking forward to the WebAssembly target, hopefully allowing us to provide a the full library to be run within the browser and use rust as the primary language to write entire web-apps. Did I mention we are looking for more contributors for the Rust code base and also hire Rust developers ;) ?

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      Sad, but until something like safenetwork.org is massively adopted and we finally move away from hosting any user information centrally, I doubt this will be the last breach…

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        Why would you use this over safenetwork.org ?

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          It always fascinates that these “but we still need to fix the server problem” presentations and posts always do such a good research and mention so many technologies but somehow don’t see the elephant in the room: maidsafe open source SAFE network fixes these problems in their underlying technology and architecture already…

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            Obligatory mention: Are we web yet?

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              Handle with care, the resource is out of date. There are email crates and there are pull requests for that on GitHub.

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                I had actually wondered that as not much seemed to have changed since last viewing it. Thanks for the heads up.

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                  It is now hosted under AreWeWebYet.org – see the relaunch announcement: http://www.arewewebyet.org/news/2016/02/16/we-are-back-baby/

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              Interesting idea, one of the comments says what I was thinking is the biggest issue:

              The ideal software project has perfect documentation, and is trivial to use. If you achieve this goal, you have just undermined the market for support, because your software needs no support.

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                Can we agree that redis, MongoDB and Postgres have excellent documentation? For all practical intents and purposes these project come as close to the ideal software project has perfect documentation as it will ever be. Yet RedisLabs (the company behind Redis), Mongo INC (the company behind Mongo) and EnterpiseDB (biggest Postgresql Consultant and Development Sponsor) all offer paid Support. If that quote was true, what are they selling? Or more over, what are companies buying? There is no ideal software project, that no one needs support for (other than the one program never written and never used). Stop making those arguments.

                Quite the opposite, I’d argue: for the raise in popularity of these project, increasingly greater documentation was mission critical – they wouldn’t have been ever become popular without it. Software companies know that: When you write good documentation, more people will be able to use the software, making the software more popular, increasing the chances that people use it in production and for critical services that they are willing to spend bucks on having support and services for. With good documentation, you aren’t eating away from your support-market-pie, you are making the pie bigger.

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                If anyone is interested in learning (various aspects of) HTTP in hands-on session, we are organsing a free (for all) workshop this Saturday in SF. Join it here