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    I have been using Linux and BSD as my only desktop since the mid 90s without much hassle at all. I must be very lucky.

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      Some other helpful links for FreeBSD Boot Environments that I’ve found over time.

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        I wish the normal upgrade process automatically created a new BE for the pre-upgrade state. Nexenta’s version of apt did this and had an apt rollback command. If that works reliably then you can always upgrade to the new shiny whatever, secure in the knowledge that you can revert if it broke things. You can do the same with FreeBSD, but it’s a lot more manual steps.

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          Yes it would be great if at least freebsd-update(8) had a -B flag (example) to do the upgrade within new BE.

          At least the additional steps are very few and not that hard.

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            I would be willing to do this, if no one else plans on doing it. Any devs here to comment?

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              Adding support for that to freebsd-update(8) may be an interesting project. It might be a better idea to add this functionality as a separate program instead, because it could be that freebsd-update will be gone in FreeBSD 14 or FreeBSD 15 because of pkg base.

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            For those building from source, there is beinstall(8) available, which automates installation and boot environment management.

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              Pity beinstall(8) is only for compiling the sources.

              Its not an issue on a 16-core AMD Ryzen but its PITA on a 2-core low power laptop CPU :)

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          I can’t even manage to get a USB Type C to plug in the first time, and I know it goes in either way. :)

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            I’m using org mode these days, but it’s really nice to see what VimWiki has accomplished. Good job!

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              Not going to attempt to remember what years I used what, but here we go.

              • Slackware 4.0 - first distro
              • Gentoo - early stages, became a dev for a few years.
              • FreeBSD
              • Debian
              • Arch
              • FreeBSD - mostly for my servers at the start, it’s been my daily driver on my desktop too for the last several years.

              I don’t think I’ll ever go back to using Linux at this point. I really have bought into the BSD style of having a full operating system out of the box. I’m so sick of removing bloat from linux distros only to have to install stuff that should be defaults but are not. Plus come on, who doesn’t want native zfs these days.

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                I use DOOM Emacs, after a lot of deliberation. I’d used a vanilla Emacs config for the good course of 4 years before realizing that DOOM did everything I was already doing, and doing it faster.

                My config is literate, and tangled automatically by DOOM’s doom command-line utility. You can find the entire config here if you’re interested.

                Also, if you’re planning on using any form of language server via LSP mode, I’d recommend building the Emacs 27 pre-release: its native JSON parser makes it far faster.

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                  I also migrated from my own bespoke literate Emacs configuration to doom. It’s feature rich and fast. It feels like I switched from Linux from Scratch to a regular distribution.

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                    I too did the great migration from vanilla Emacs to Doom recently, and wrote about it: https://blog.jethro.dev/posts/migrating_to_doom_emacs/

                    I don’t really miss my old config, but haven’t fully gotten used to the keybindings in Doom.

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                      +1 to DOOM. I switched from Vim to Emacs in maybe ‘15 for the Clojure support (CIDER is a must-have) and maintained my own config because I didn’t see anything attractive I wanted to adopt at the time. I recently decided that my homebrewed config was far too slow and a pain to maintain and made the switch to DOOM which has been almost entirely win. I’ve ported a few bits here and there forwards, but overall with evil-mode turned off I find even stock base DOOM excellent.

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                        Ok, DOOM is fast, but your config could be just as fast. I mean, I managed to pull of those those startup times and loadings (with margin of error of few or tens of mili seconds which are tolerable).

                        People just don’t read documentation of use-package. (or aren’t using it at all which is even worse) I made my config lazy in mathematical sense, don’t load anything unless I start using it. Rest are minor tweakings and tricks but you get the idea. With a bit of work your config could be just as fast. If you must have vim configs than it’s fine, I’ll choose DOOM over spacemacs any time of the day.

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                          Yeah I’m another doom emacs convert. I started off working with a literate emacs config. It was painfully slow no matter what I did. Doom starts almost as fast as vim, even faster once the daemon is running.

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                          Doom Eternal & Doom64, Some Rust Programming, got a new project in the works. I also should be moving a couple of my personal VMs away from OVH. That is a story in itself. Screw OVH.

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                            It’s been go for the last few years, but more recently i’m leaning into Rust.

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                              I have a server at ovh I host my group of nerdy friends stuff.

                              • RocketChat (we all talk here)
                              • WWW like blogs, filebin, tt-rss
                              • Minecraft Server
                              • Seedbox
                              • Gitlab

                              At home the only thing I have is NAS and Plex running on a older dell server. I would gladly host more stuff at home but my upload speed from my ISP sucks.

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                                I use RSS every day, it’s still used on almost every site. Total BS.

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                                  I been a fan of https://dnsimple.com/ for years.

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                                      I’m hard pressed to even find a peertube video with peers, besides whats advertised on the front page. Makes it hard to watch what is listed. Or am I missing how this works?

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                                        Python: It helps a lot of non-programmers learn to program. Man, that was hard.

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                                          We use ssh certs where I work and they have worked really nicely for our use case. The only issue with them is PuTTY does not support them.

                                          https://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/wishlist/ssh2-openssh-certkeys.html

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                                            Honest question, is there a point for putty for the windows admins out there at this point with OpenSSH in powershell?

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                                              I don’t know, I run linux. I just know a few years ago it was a small hiccup in adopting signed ssh keys. Personally I would push people to just use openssh, but I assume windows users love their GUIs.

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                                                How long has OpenSSH in PowerShell been halfway usable?

                                                Can I have different color schemes, for one thing? How about typefaces?

                                                I’ve been using PuTTy for close to 2 decades now. It’s quirky, sure, but it’s what I’m used to…

                                                1. 3

                                                  I found that wsl + ssh-agent-wsl are just what I need. There are a few terminal emulator apps that are reasonably usable: wsltty, windows terminal (amazingly enough) and terminus or extraterm (both electron apps).

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                                                    I’m not a windows admin,but I know you can theme powershell via the terminal. When I do have to use windows I install a terminal called alacritty and run openssh from there.

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                                                      I’ve tried a couple of other terminal emulators for Windows but keep coming back to PuTTy…

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                                                Ghostscript has really improved over the years. I went back to that recently.

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                                                  GitLab have had CI/CD for ages and it works great, I get that git hub ci is also nice but it feels overly hyped? Does it bring something that other providers lack?

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                                                    I don’t get how OP can write such a post and not mention GitLab. Reminds me of Apple’s habit of adopting old tech (e.g. NFC) and calling it “innovative”.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      This reads a lot like a paid advertisement. Fail to consider alternatives that have existed for years? Check. Do not mention anything bad/negative? Check.

                                                    2. 5

                                                      Yeah, doesn’t look to me like there’s anything that Gitlab hasn’t been doing for a while already. I guess I can understand the hype though, a few months I set up Gitlab CI for one of the project I’m working on at my current job and to somebody who’s never done this before it looks cool and exciting.

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                                                        Something that surprised me was the ability to schedule workflows to run regularly – it eliminated a cronjob from a VPS and keeps the schedule with the code.

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                                                          You can do this in gitlab-ci too.

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                                                            Neat! I had no idea.

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                                                      Does this include the new amdgpu support?

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                                                        I’m just sitting here enjoying my jails running smoothly :) Sorry had to say it.

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                                                          The choice to use alt as mod key and therefor to overwriting commonly used keybindings seems very counter productive.

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                                                            Considering that most people who even would want to use this, will compile this by themselves, replacing Mod1Mask with something else shouldn’t be that difficult. These things are made to be hacked with after all.

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                                                              XMonad does this too; I think they pick a bad default specifically in order to make people install the Haskell compiler and learn enough to change it.

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                                                                Didn’t know it was intentional in the case of Xmonad. That’s probably also the reason I never got into it too, since it’s not only haskell but an entire DSL you’d have to learn.

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                                                                  It’s only speculation, but it’s hard to find any other explanation for such a bad default.

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                                                              I’m probably in the minority, but changing my mod key to alt is the first thing I do when I configure my window manager. I just have a easier time to hit alt.

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                                                                This drives me insane.

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                                                                  I use dwm which also uses alt keys and I don’t recall it ever being a problem. Programs I use seem to prefer ctrl keys.

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                                                                    most shells and gnu readline have alt+w and alt+b moving by words by default, alt+hjkl are commonly used too, but they seem to do different things in different shells.

                                                                    edit: and I forgot about the the common pattern of GUI applications using alt to access the file, edit… etc menu by underlining the character that is bound: https://i.imgur.com/DyNr4kd.png