1. 7

    From the FAQ: “Why is the pound a measure of mass, not force (or currency?)”

    Well, in the United States, the pound has been officially defined to be a unit of mass since at least 1893 (by the Office of Standard Weights and Measures, and later by its successor, the National Bureau of Standards (NBS), which was formed in 1901. The National Bureau of Standards was renamed the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in 1988.) It has had its current value since 1959, defined as exactly 0.45359237 kilograms (also a unit of mass,) both by official notice in the Federal Register, giving it the effect of official U.S. policy, and as an official refinement by the National Bureau of Standards.

    I had no idea!

    1. 12

      The entire data file is a wonderful read.

      // In other words, if you use the Hz in the way it’s currently defined by the SI, as equivalent to 1 radian/s, you can point to the SI definitions and prove that you follow their definitions precisely. And your physics teacher will still fail you and your clients will think you’re completely incompetent because 1 Hz = 2 pi radians/s. And it has for centuries. You are both simultaneously both right and both wrong.
      You cannot win. You are perfectly right. You are perfectly wrong. You look dumb and unreasonable. The person arguing the opposite looks dumb and unreasonable.

      // Hz == YOU CANNOT WIN

      1. 2

        It really is. As a history fan, I particularly like that it has antiquated units like amphora and talents. Great stuff!

      2. 1

        I had no idea!

        Huh. Me either, because this is apparently another thing that my high school Physics teacher was completely wrong about.