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    The article doesn’t explain what Busy Beaver is. Of course there’s a Wikipedia page, but I’m coming around to the idea (with apologies to any algorithmic Wikipedia page authors out there) that Wikipedia is the worst place in the known universe to go if you want to actually understand a concept in computer science.

    I found this video rather helpful.

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      This essay from the same author in 1999 is a good introduction: https://www.scottaaronson.com/writings/bignumbers.html.

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      My first contribution was to a Rails plugin called nested_form by Ryan Bates, the creator of Railscasts. I was learning about a lot of new technologies at the time including git, Ruby and Rails. Ryan quickly accepted the pull request which made my day!

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        I have had an almost identical experience, at various points storing bookmarks on del.icio.us, Xmarks and Pocket and keeping starred items on YouTube, Reddit, etc. Today I keep a Git managed folder of Markdown files most of which contain annotated lists: bookmarks, movies, books, papers, places I’ve been, things I want to buy, etc. It’s more of a personal diary than something I would like to share publically.

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          I’ve tried that, and what didn’t work for me as recall. I could remember the approximate topic of a link but without fuzzy search (much like Google, contextual), I gave up.

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          I would also add Math from Three to Seven: The Story of a Mathematical Circle for Preschoolers to the list. It’s a great resource for the teacher/parent rather than the child on how to run a Math circle. I’m only a few chapters in but I’ve found it to be a great source of ideas and inspiration for engaging a 6 year old and a 3 year old. Unfortunately our circle is small.

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            I’m reading Daniel J. Solove’s “A Taxonomy of Privacy” (https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=667622).