1. 1

    Looks like there’s a problem with the upload: the video just ends abruptly mid-sentence.

    1. 8

      a quick google-fu reveals this and ofcourse here is the linked presentation. enjoy !

      1. 1

        It doesn’t load at all for me. I just see a grey circle with an exclamation point. The sidebar doesn’t even load.

        1. 1

          the link that i have posted above, does seem to work. may you please give that a try ?

          1. 1

            Yes, your link worked fine.

      1. 2

        Making a pilgrimage to a Chinese supermarket in Birmingham (1.5h on the train) to stock up on supplies this morning, so there will inevitably be some cooking this weekend. I also want to do some work with beets to get my ~/Music into shape for my new mpd server (built a raspberry pi & hifiberry digi+ player last weekend).

        1. 2

          Working on small side project website, mobile, and JSON API and setting up switching over to Doom Emacs config from Spacemacs.

          Aside, if you use Spacemacs, does it eat up your power/battery? I am on macOS and Energy usage in Activity Monitor nearly sits steady 150+ during usage and I get maybe 75 minutes of battery on a 2017 MacBook Pro.

          1. 1

            What on earth is it doing to draw power like that? I run Emacs (just my own config) and even with rcirc and mastodon.el filling a few buffers it typically sits at zero CPU usage.

            1. 1

              You can try doing profiling on your Emacs to see what plugin can take so much CPU: https://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/manual/html_node/elisp/Profiling.html . Usually, it’s not Emacs itself, it’s a plugin that might misbehave.

            1. 5

              I’ve been using Enpass for a couple of years now. I sync my phone/laptop/desktop via Google Drive (handily the Qt desktop version bakes in Drive support so I don’t need to run Google’s full Drive sync client on either my Macbook or desktop).

              I would prefer an open-source solution, but so far haven’t found any ringing alarm bells with Enpass. I like that it has a fingerprint auth option on Android, and that the Qt versions (after initial unlock with long master password) can be set to unlock with a PIN. I realise this isn’t the most secure setup, but it is convenient to use, and that has resulted in me using it for everything.

              1. 1

                I use this because it’s the only one that does Webdav syncing.

                I don’t trust Google or any of the other large cloud provider (1Password only does icloud sync) enough to let them have even an encrypted copy of my passwords. Still, Google won’t buzz off, Chrome continues to insist that it should be my password manager…

              1. 2

                I use a Vortex Race 3 and absolutely love it. It’s compact, like a really good laptop keyboard, with dedicated buttons for everything I want dedicated buttons for (and none of the ones I never/rarely use). The only customisation I have is the usual remapping of caps lock to control. I’ve tried a few switches and settled on MX browns. Pretty vanilla all-round :-)

                1. 3

                  It’s amazing to see how much better he’s gotten at giving talks since then.

                  1. 2

                    It sounds like a small audience, but even so I think he does a good job here: his pacing is good, and he mostly avoids the umm/err problem so many of us have when giving a presentation. I imagine this isn’t too long after he realised he had a talent for this :-)

                  1. 1

                    Finally we can split windows normally :-D

                    1. 12

                      Wow, that’s a lot of bloat, and a great demonstration of why I don’t use Gnome (or KDE).

                      I’m much happier with StumpWM, which just does its job and doesn’t try to integrate with everything.

                      1. 12

                        Unfortunately, if you want Wayland — and I do, as it really has made all my vsync/stuttering/tearing issues go away; Fedora is now as smooth as my mac/windows — your choices are limited. Sway is starting to look good but otherwise there’s not much at the minimal end of the spectrum.

                        If I have to choose between GNOME and KDE, I pick GNOME for the same reasons the author of this piece does. I was hoping the tips would come down to more than “uninstall tracker, evolution daemons et al. and hope for the best”. I’ve done that before on Fedora and ended up wrangling package dependancies in yum. I really wish GNOME/Fedora would take this sort of article to heart and offer a “minimal GNOME” option which is effectively just gnome-shell.

                        1. 3

                          Why is Wayland so poorly implemented? Is it because few distributions have it as default or is it because it’s harder? I see many tilling wm written in 50 different languages and it seems that sway is getting slowly it’s way to a usable wm, but it seems like a slow adoption from my point of view.

                          1. 4

                            It is a slow adoption, I’m not particularly sure why. Most (all?) of the tiling wms for X leverage Xlib or XCB, right? Perhaps it’s just needed some time for a similarly mature compositor lib to appear for Wayland (indeed, Sway is replacing their initial use of wlc with wlroots which may end up being that).

                            As for why Wayland in general isn’t more prevalent, I’d guess compatibility. X is just so well established that replacing it is inherently a lot of work in the “last mile”. Fedora/GNOME/Wayland works great for me with my in-kernel open AMD driver. Maybe it’s not as good for Intel iGPUs? Maybe it’s not so good on Nvidia systems? Maybe it doesn’t work at all on arm SoC things? I have no idea, but I can easily understand distros holding off on making it default.

                            1. 3

                              Maybe it’s not so good on Nvidia systems?

                              Exactly, the proprietary driver does not support GBM, they’ve been pushing their own thing (EGLStreams) that compositors don’t want.

                              Maybe it’s not as good for Intel iGPUs? Maybe it doesn’t work at all on arm SoC things?

                              Everything works great with any open drivers, including VC4 for the RPi.

                              1. 2

                                Maybe it’s not as good for Intel iGPUs?

                                Just a data point: I’ve got a new thinkpad recently, installed linux on it, together with gnome3. Only yesterday I’ve discovered it was running on wayland the whole time, with no apparent problems what-so-ever. And that includes working with a dock with two further displays attached, and steam games. Even the touch panel on the screen works without any further config.

                            2. 1

                              Unfortunately, if you want Wayland — and I do, as it really has made all my vsync/stuttering/tearing issues go away; Fedora is now as smooth as my mac/windows

                              And effortless support for multiple displays with different DPIs, plus better isolation of applications. I completely agree, when I switched to Wayland on Fedora 25 or 26, it was the first time I felt in a long time that the Linux desktop is on par again with macOS and Windows (minus some gnome-shell bugs that seem to have been mostly fixed now).

                              At some point, I might switch to Sway. But with Sway 0.15, X.org applications are still scaled up and blurry on a HiDPI screen (whereas they work fine in GNOME). I’ll give it another go once Sway 1.0 is out.

                              1. 1

                                not much at the minimal end of the spectrum

                                Weston! :)

                                My fork even has fractional scaling (Mac/GNOME style downscaling) and FreeBSD support.

                                1. 1

                                  There’s a Wayland for FreeBSD? I thought Wayland had a lot of Linux specific stuff in it?

                                  1. 3

                                    Sure, there is some, but who said you can’t reimplement that stuff?

                                    • libwayland, the reference implementation of client and server libraries, uses epoll. We have an epoll implementation on top of kqueue.
                                    • Most compositors use libinput to read from input devices, and libinput:
                                      • reads from evdev devices (via libevdev but that’s a really thin lib). We have evdev support in many drivers, including Synaptics (with TrackPoint support).
                                      • uses libudev for device lookup and hotplug. We have a partial libudev implementation on top of devd.
                                    • For GPU acceleration, compositors need a modern DRM/KMS/GBM stack with PRIME and whatnot. We have that.
                                    • Compositors also need some way of managing a virtual terminal (vt), this is the fun part (not).
                                      • direct vt manipulation / setuid wrapper (weston-launch) is pretty trivial to modify to support FreeBSD, that’s how Weston and Sway work right now
                                      • I’m building a generic weston-launch clone: loginw
                                      • ConsoleKit2 should work?? I think we might get KDE Plasma’s kwin_wayland to work on this??
                                      • there were some projects aimed at reimplementing logind for BSD, but they didn’t go anywhere…
                                    1. 1

                                      For GPU acceleration, compositors need a modern DRM/KMS/GBM stack with PRIME and whatnot. We have that.

                                      Do NVidia’s drivers use the same stack, or are they incompatible with the Wayland port? I’d give Wayland a try, but it seems hard to find a starting point… I’m running CURRENT with custom Poudriere-built packages, so patches or non-standard options aren’t a problem, I just can’t find any info on how to start.

                                      1. 2

                                        No, proprietary nvidia drivers are not compatible. Nvidia still does not want to support GBM, so even on Linux, support is limited (you can only use compositors that implemented EGLStreams, like… sway 0.x I think?) Plus, I’m not sure about the mode setting situation (nvidia started using actual proper KMS on Linux recently I think?? But did they do it on FreeBSD?)

                                        It should be easy to import Nouveau to drm-next though, someone just has to do it :)

                                        Also, you can get it to work without hardware acceleration (there is an scfb patch for Weston), but I think software rendering is unacceptable.

                                2. 1

                                  I tried to give Wayland a try twice, on both my media PC and a new Laptop. It’s still really not there yet. I use i3 on X11 and Sway is really buggy, lacks a lot of backwards compatibility stubs (notification tray icons are a big one) and just doesn’t quite match i3 yet. Weston, the reference window manager, had a lot of similar problems when using it with my media PC.

                                  I want to move on to Wayland, and I might give that other i3 drop-in for Wayland a try in the future, but right now it’s still not there yet.

                              1. 3

                                htop is nice, until you got so used to it that you find a system without it frustrating and unintuitive.

                                IMO, top is to htom like vi to vim: feel free to use it, but keep in mind that it has more features that one needs. Knowing the basics the “simpler” tools isn’t that bad.

                                1. 1

                                  One of the things I find myself doing most often with htop is viewing a filtered list of processes. I can sort of get the same with top with something like top -p $(pgrep -d ',' "foo|bar"), but that only shows processes that existed when you start the command, and doesn’t pick up new ones (it also doesn’t work on BSD where the -pid switch doesn’t take comma-delimited lists like Linux’s -p does).

                                  I guess I’m just missing it, but how are we supposed to view a live-filtered list in top (same as <F4> in htop)?

                                1. 1

                                  Is Fedora used much any more?

                                  1. 2

                                    Nope. Never heard of such distro.

                                    1. 2

                                      I still use it :-) Anecdotally (other users spotted “in the wild”) I think I’d even say usage is increasing in the last few years.

                                    1. 1

                                      Is this just a frontend for graphviz?

                                      1. 4

                                        No, it’s its own system. I used it for a while for flowcharts and sequence diagrams at work, and it does the job okay. The main benefit over graphviz is that it’s way easier to learn and can be embedded in markdown more easily. But if you want anything more complicated than a flow, or you want any control over the weights, you’re stuck with graphviz.

                                        1. 1

                                          Thanks. Might be useful for some but I’ll stick with orgmode where you can embed graphviz, ditaa and a whole bunch of others.

                                        2. 1

                                          It’s using d3 underneath for drawing, rather than Graphviz. Looks like someone liked the idea of PlantUML but wanted to build it in javascript (without Graphviz).

                                        1. 2

                                          Yay! Still want to un-Python2 my Arch machine, but sadly calibre won’t be ported to Python 3.

                                          1. 1

                                            I was curious so I searched; statement from a few months ago:

                                            No, I will simply maintain python 2 myself, far less work and I already do it for the windows python.

                                            I’m going to laugh if in ten years my machine still has a python 2 interpreter, stubbornly maintained by Kovid :-)

                                          1. 19

                                            The best way to combat this is to not answer the questions for password reset at all. Use a password manager, and when a company asks something like “what was the name of your favorite teacher” give an answer like “zod the destroyer 7899” and never mention or tell anyone about this. Even if someone knows your favorite teacher, it won’t help them.

                                            1. 3

                                              I generate all the answers with my password manager too - and don’t re-use them between systems. It’s a bit of a pain to generate them but they’re not often asked for and I don’t want to have to inform my mother her maiden name is part of a data breach.

                                              1. 3

                                                Unfortunately you do need to be a bit careful with this. It’s possible (however dumb) that these answers are stored in plaintext and then presented to the user either as-is (multiple choice) or partially obscured (complete this name).

                                                If an attacker is trying to get through the reset process and are confronted with “What’s your mother’s maiden name? a) Jones, b) Smith or c) F32djsb/.$%” they might have better than 1-in-3 odds :-)

                                                1. 2

                                                  I’m partial to being born somewhere like: Earth Sol System Orion Minor Galactic Arm Milky Way Galaxy

                                                  And my favorite pet sometimes has ended up being something like: Leeloominai ekatariba tchai ekbat de sebat

                                                  And favorite colors being Steve.

                                                  I just plug all that crap into my password manager so that all my random “copy something from an open webpage” answers don’t go away.

                                                  1. 1

                                                    I do this (except the answers are randomly generated) and it turns out it mostly doesn’t matter. I’ve had to call services that use them and talk to customer service representatives. They’ve asked me the questions, along with other identifying information, and I told them that I didn’t know the answer. All I said was that it was probably random junk. They just ignored it and continued to deal with my problem.

                                                    What’s even more interesting is that rep on the phone would admonish me for forgetting the answer, telling me that they ask these things for my own security. It didn’t seem to register, even after I mentioned it, that it obviously doesn’t since I just bypassed them.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      A number of sites now do “identity verification” through (I believe) the credit agencies, where they’ll ask you questions about previous addresses based on the records those agencies have–not based on answers you provided yourself at any point.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Yeah but that costs money and it still doesn’t fix the problem because your previous addresses can be know by the attacker.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          Right, my point was that it’s not enough to use fake answers to security questions, because the real answers (at least regarding previous addresses) are still useful to attackers against these identity verification systems.

                                                        2. 1

                                                          Not that you nor I can do anything about it here and now, but that practice should be heavily discouraged. The whole point of security questions is to answer stuff only I know. Which also makes 90% of the currently available choices (“Mother’s maiden name”, “First pet”, etc.) really poor choices. Allow me to make my own question and answer, and it should improve handily for some people, whereas people who fall back to the default questions are no worse off.

                                                      1. 5

                                                        I’d appreciate it if any NixOS users here could offer a little advice: I’ve played a little with Nix, and read about NixOS, and I’m interested in switching because there are enough things that tempt me:

                                                        • Defining my workstation setup in a single, easily understood, interpretable file (I sort-of-but-not-really have this now with an org doc that contains notes + shell commands to be run on a new Fedora install).
                                                        • Nix shell for ad-hoc (and not!) envs for work stuff (honestly, this alone might be the killer feature).
                                                        • The apparent ease of writing my own nix packages.

                                                        However, I’ve become used to the following and I don’t want to lose them:

                                                        • Up-to-date kernels. I use the AMD opensource drivers and they’re a work-in-progress (I see the brand new Impala release has 4.14, the previous release was 4.9; my “old” Fedora 27 install already has 4.15).
                                                        • Wayland, for all its foibles, has fixed my screen tearing woes and in its up-to-date Fedora/GNOME incarnation works very well for me. I don’t want to go back to X.
                                                        • Things working; Fedora is boring in a good way, I can get on with my work with very little fiddling.

                                                        Is NixOS for me? Would a combination of Fedora + Nix perhaps serve me better?

                                                        1. 4
                                                          • boot.kernelPackages = pkgs.linuxPackages_4_15; has worked for me in both 17.09 and 18.03
                                                          • Not sure about wayland support, I think you need to start gnome-session with wayland manually? Anyways here is the tracking issue.
                                                          • Things just work and stay working for me after I got my configuration.nix set up - not a lot of maintenance needed imo.
                                                          1. 3

                                                            This is exactly what I was looking for, thank you.

                                                        1. 7

                                                          Sad to see these go.

                                                          I’ve been using wee-slack for a few weeks now, and it looks like I will have to get used to it.

                                                          1. 4

                                                            I never had access to the IRC gateway (admins at work refused to turn it on) so this has been a life-saver since I started my job. It works much better than I was expecting.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Conversely, while my workplace has the IRC gateway enabled, I can’t use wee-slack because I don’t have perms to install their Slack integration :-/

                                                            2. 3

                                                              Like other folks have said, I’ve also been dreading this. There’s not a lot of chat rooms that are worth the RAM and UI of Slack. Thanks very much for this link. I’ve been considering a move from irssi to weechat for a few years (my twitter client is unmaintained and I don’t enjoy the Perl), maybe this will be the final push to get me to shave this yak.

                                                              1. 4

                                                                I moved from irssi to weechat under duress myself. After an OS upgrade bold ceased working for me and was not able to fix it! I find weechat better designed: I’ve used it as an example of convergent evolution in tooling, by comparing irssi and weechat to screen and tmux: both irssi and screen feel haphazard whereas weechat and tmux have a more layered, bottom-up design.

                                                                All in all I’m happy to have moved to weechat. I must admit however I still keep an irssi running for the things I haven’t managed to port yet. It’s one of the rougher migrations I’ve had.

                                                            1. 8

                                                              Sort of an aside discussion, but the author’s choice to distribute the code as a Docker image: is that becoming a thing now?

                                                              I’m notorious among my peers for installing and trying everything under the sun, and usually having to blow out and reinstall my computer about once a year (usually coinciding with Apple’s release of an updated MacOS). Maybe I’m late to the party, but Docker images are a much cleaner way of distributing projects in a working environment, are they not?

                                                              1. 13

                                                                This feels like the kind of thing I’d be grumpy about if I were any older; software distribution is one of our oldest and therefore most-studied problems. Java tried to solve it with a universal runtime. Package managers try to solve it with an army of maintainers who manage dependencies. Giving up on all that and bundling the entirety of latex and all its dependencies (one of the intermediate images is 3 point 23 fucking gigs!) just to distribute a 279 line style file and make it easier to use feels… kind of excessive?

                                                                That said, I’m not old and grumpy and this is awesome. I kind of hope that this becomes a thing, it’s easy to install and easy to remove (and know that you’ve left no traces on your system) and this image will presumably be usable for a very long time.

                                                                EDIT: I wrote the above comment while I was waiting for the image to finish downloading. It’s now finished and the final image takes up 5.63GB of my disk space. I don’t mind for this one-off package but would certainly mind if this method of distribution started catching on. Maybe we should just all use nix?

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  I wrote the above comment while I was waiting for the image to finish downloading. It’s now finished and the final image takes up 5.63GB of my disk space. I don’t mind for this one-off package but would certainly mind if this method of distribution started catching on. Maybe we should just all use nix?

                                                                  Docker has some mechanisms for sharing significant parts of those images… at least if they’re created from the same base. The problem obviously is that people are free to do whatever, so that sharing is far from optimal.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Agreed, I assumed this was going to be something like a 200 python script with maybe 2 or 3 dependencies.

                                                                  2. 4

                                                                    A docker image is the new curl|sh install method.

                                                                    Basically ignore any concerns about security, updates, ‘I want this shit now Ma.’

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      A random docker image is less likely to fuck up your home dir, though.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        I’ve spent a lot more time working with the shell than Docker. I find this Docker image a lot easier to understand and verify than various things I’ve been told to curl | sh.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          Couldn’t you just download and verify a script with curl -o filename.sh http://domain.name/filename.sh? How does a random Docker image end up being easier to verify? With a script you can just read through it, and verify what it does. With a Docker image you basically have to trust an image from 2014 of an entire operating system.

                                                                          This honestly looks like one of the worst candidates for a Docker image. You have a tiny plaintext file which is all this is installing, and you are being told to download a multi gigabyte blob. I can understand why some people recommend using Docker for development, and running things and places you might not have control of the entire system, it here just seems unnecessary here.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            I don’t see how it’s installing just a style. It’s installing TeX, which is a big hairy package.

                                                                            When I pull down the install for rustup, I end up with a 360 line shell script, which isn’t super easy to verify. For haskell’s stack, it’s 720. I swear I’ve seen 1500 before.

                                                                        2. 1

                                                                          Agree re security (you could get hacked) but at least it won’t accidentally wipe your hard drive while trying to uninstall (as has happened a few timed I’m aware of).

                                                                        3. 3

                                                                          In this case especially, as the instructions to install and configure are pretty painful:

                                                                          https://github.com/Jubobs/gitdags

                                                                          Oh, there are none. But there is this:

                                                                          http://chrisfreeman.github.io/gitdags_install.html

                                                                          As an aside, the Docker image has a couple of features I’m quite proud of (in a small way).

                                                                          1. The default command of the container outputs help text.

                                                                          2. If the convert_images.sh script spots a Makefile, it runs it, eg:

                                                                          https://github.com/ianmiell/gitdags/blob/master/examples/Makefile

                                                                          which reduces build time significantly if you have a lot of images.

                                                                          1. 4

                                                                            Just scrolling through that second link gives me anxiety; oh my god this is going to go wrong in fifty different ways. Getting it all together in a configured package (docker image) was pretty smart.

                                                                            1. 3

                                                                              I don’t know… Looking at the second link, the install instructions are actually fairly simple if you have TeX and the dependencies installed. Even if you don’t, like it’s just a LaTeX distribution, the tikz package, and the xcolor-solarized package.

                                                                              In which case the instructions are only:

                                                                              $ cd ${LATEX_ROOT}/texmf/tex/latex && git clone https://github.com/Jubobs/gitdags.git
                                                                              $ kpsewhich gitdags.sty   # Check to see if gitdags.sty can be seen by TeX
                                                                              

                                                                              I feel like an entire Docker container is a little overkill. Might be an OK way to try the software, especially if you don’t have a TeX distribution installed, but it wouldn’t be a good way to actually use it.

                                                                              1. 1

                                                                                From the link:

                                                                                ‘First, do NOT use apt-get to install. The best is to install TexLive from the Tex Users Groug (TUG).’

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  Yeah like I said, the instructions are fairly simple if you have a TeX distribution Installed. If that version does happened to be from a distribution, I’m sure it works anyways - he did say the best way.

                                                                                  If you don’t happen to have TeX installed, it’s not that complicated to install it from manually from TUG anyways.

                                                                                2. 1

                                                                                  Looking at the second link, the install instructions are actually fairly simple if you have TeX and the dependencies installed

                                                                                  Yeah, I already have TeX on my system, so I don’t really see what the problem is.

                                                                                3. 1

                                                                                  The default command of the container outputs help text.

                                                                                  I haven’t seen that before; for a “packaging” container (rather than an “app deployment” container) it’s a nice touch I’ll be copying, thanks :-)

                                                                                4. 2

                                                                                  I’ve used this very package with nix on OS X, I think a docker image is… a bit over the top personally. It wasn’t that bad to install and setup compared to any other latex package.

                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                  This seems really cool. I’d love to have email more under my own control. I also need 100% uptime for email though, so it’s hard to contemplate moving from some large hosted service like Gmail.

                                                                                  1. 4

                                                                                    If email is that important to you (100% uptime requirement), then what’s your backup plan for a situation where Google locks your account for whatever reason?

                                                                                    1. 1

                                                                                      Yeah, that’s true. I mean I do have copies of all my email locally, so at least I wouldn’t lose access to old email, but it doesn’t help for new email in that eventuality.

                                                                                    2. 3

                                                                                      Email does have the nifty feature that (legit) mail servers will keep retrying SMTP connections to you if you’re down for a bit, so you don’t really need 100% uptime.

                                                                                      Source: ran a mail server for my business for years on a single EC2 instance; sometimes it went down, but it was never a real problem.

                                                                                      1. 1

                                                                                        True. I rely on email enough that I’m wary of changing a (more or less) working system. But I could always transition piece by piece.

                                                                                      2. 3

                                                                                        If you need 100% delivery, then you can just list multiple MX records. If your primary MX goes down (ISP outage, whatever), then your mail will just get delivered to the backup. My DNS registrar / provider offers backup MX service, and I have them configured to just forward everything to gmail. So when my self hosted email is unavailable, email starts showing up via gmail until the primary MX is back online. Provides peace of mind when the power goes out or my ISP has outages, or we’re moving house and everything is torn apart.

                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                          That’s a good system that seems worth looking into.

                                                                                        2. 2

                                                                                          Note that email resending works. If your server is unreachable, the sending mail server will actually try the secondary MX server, and if both are down, it will retry half an hour later, then a few more times up to 24 hours later, 48 hours if you are lucky. The sender will usually receive a noification if the initial attempts fail (and a second one when the sending server gives up)

                                                                                          On the other hand, if your GMail spam filter randomly decides without a good reason that a reply to your email is too dangerous even to put into the spam folder, neither you nor the sender will be notified.

                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                            And I have had that issue with GMail, both as a sender and a receiver, of mail inexplicably going missing. Not frequently, but it occurs.

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          I’ve heard a great deal of buzz and praise for this editor. I’ve got a couple decades’ experience with my current editor – is it good enough to warrant considering a switch?

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            What do you love about your current editor?

                                                                                            What do you dislike about it?

                                                                                            What are the things your editor needs to provide that you aren’t willing to compromise on?

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              It probably isn’t, but it’s maybe worth playing around with, just to see how it compares. It’s definitely the best behaved Electron app I’ve ever seen. It doesn’t compete with the Emacs operating system configurations, but it does compete for things like Textmate, Sublime, and the other smaller code-editors. It has VI bindings(via a plugin) that’s actually pretty good(and can use neovim under the hood!). I still don’t understand Microsoft’s motivation for writing this thing, but it’s nice that they dedicate a talented team to it.

                                                                                              It’s very much still a work in progress, but it’s definitely usable.

                                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                                Here’s the story of how it was created[1]. It’s a nice, technical interview. However, the most important thing about this editor is that it marked an interesting shift in Microsoft’s culture. It appears that is the single most widely used open source product originating by MS.

                                                                                                https://changelog.com/podcast/277

                                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                                  Thanks for linking that show up.

                                                                                              2. 2

                                                                                                It’s worth a try. It’s pretty good. I went from vim to vscode mostly due to windows support issues. I often switch between operating systems, so having a portable editor matters.

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                                                                                                  It’s pretty decent editor to try it out. I’ve personally given up because it’s just too slow :| The only scenario in which I tolerate slowness, is a heavy-weight IDE (e.g., IntelliJ family). For simple editing I’d rather check out sublime (it’s not gratis, but it’s pretty fast).

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                                                                                                    It doesn’t have to be a hard switch, I for example switch between vim and vs-code depending on the language and task. And if there is some Java or Kotlin to code then I will use Intellij Idea, simply because it feels like the best tool for the job. See your text editors more like a tool in your toolbelt, you won’t drive in a screw with a hammer, won’t you? I see the text editors I use more like a tool in my toolbelt.

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                                                                                                      I do a similar thing. I’ve found emacs unbearable for java (the best solution I’ve seen is eclim which literally runs eclipse in the background), so I use intellij for that.

                                                                                                      For python, emacs isn’t quite as bad as it is with java, but I’ve found pycharm to be much better.

                                                                                                      Emacs really wins out with pretty much anything else, especially C/++ and lisps.

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                                                                                                        VS Code has a very nice python module (i.e. good autocomplete and debugger), the author of which has been hired by MS to work on it full time. Not quite PyCharm-level yet but worth checking out if you’re using Code for other stuff.

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                                                                                                    While I have personally not used it, is this not something orgmode (emacs) does?

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                                                                                                      Org could be one component of a solution for this, but on its own it lacks: a way to edit via mobile/other devices, any means of uploading images, a blessed rendering path (there are many ways to render/export org files into something for display).

                                                                                                      For instance, one solution might be to use Org’s “publish” feature. You could render to HTML, push that to some web host somewhere with rsync (that handles viewing on other/mobile devices). For editing you could sync your org source files (and any org-rendered images via things like plantuml, as well as static images) with something like syncthing/git/Dropbox/Box/iCloud/OneDrive etc. in combination with a non-Emacs editing app like Beorg (iOS) or Orgzly (Android).

                                                                                                      That would be a workable and powerful system, but I think we have to admit it’s not as simple to use as just clicking “edit” in a wiki page from something like dokuwiki/mediawiki :-)

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                                                                                                        I’ve found I don’t do any significant note editing on the phone - just capture.

                                                                                                        So I use Google Photos + Orgzly + Syncthing + emacs. It used to be MobileOrg, and I started with org ~2005, so these files got bones.

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                                                                                                          I have been looking for something like beorg for a long time. Thanks!!

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                                                                                                          I love orgmode and use it on and off but last I looked sharing it was read-only and meant exporting the static document or running something (node, ruby) that parses the format on the fly.

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                                                                                                          Relatedly, if you have linked a Twitter account on your settings page, you will be added to this Twitter list in a few minutes.

                                                                                                          If Mastadon has a similar feature, I’d take a PR for it.

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                                                                                                            Groups equivalents (bangs) are available on gnu-social but are sadly not yet implemented on Mastodon.

                                                                                                            Related github issue

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                                                                                                              Lists are being implemented though.

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                                                                                                                I agree with Gorgron. Hashtags should be enough. Subscribing to hashtags would be the next logical step.

                                                                                                                For everybody in here: Use the #lobsters hashtag ;)

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                                                                                                                  Hashtags don’t really seem usable for this particular case; it’s not as if the people in the Twitter list pushcx made of lobsters users are going to tag every single tweet of theirs with the #lobsters hashtag.

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                                                                                                                    I honestly don’t see the use in being able to see who uses what websites… is there a more compelling use case for groups/lists?

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                                                                                                                      Lists are useful on Twitter because I can follow people I know or am interested in generally, and add other more specific accounts to a list. Because I don’t follow them they don’t show up in my main timeline, but I can (for instance) switch to viewing a list-as-timeline for my hometown list (mostly local news + some local businesses) or my “China journos” list (for when I want to see what’s happening with China news). I don’t want to see this content all the time, and I do want it silo’d; thus lists are useful (to me).

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                                                                                                                        it sounds like you’re using two different notions of list. the ability to view posts from only a certain set of people makes sense, but i don’t see why this couldn’t be implemented in a fashion similar to email clients (which can support any arbitrary filtering you like).

                                                                                                                        as for the ability to find people on mastodon who you also know on lobsters, implementing lists as a separate feature on mastodon seems like a poor solution. it still requires lobsters users to add themselves to the list, and there’s the unresolved problem of mapping lobsters id’s to mastodon id’s. the most sensible solution seems to be what people on lobsters already do: list your handles on other sites from your lobsters profile.

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                                                                                                                      Mass-subscribing and mass-unsubscribing is not a good use case either? Well, I never understood why Twitter lets you subscribe to other peoples lists. Cloning lists would be useful, because then I can mass-subscribe and adapt it to my needs.

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                                                                                                                      Subscribing to hashtags would be the next logical step.

                                                                                                                      Just discovered that this is kind of possible already: Search for the hashtag, then “pin” the column with its settings top right.