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    Flying to California for a week of camping and hanging out with old friends on the beach and in the trees.

    Speaking of which, any book recommendations? Genre or subject is irrelevant so long as the book is good. I just loaded Hallucinations by Sacks onto my ereader but that will probably not last the week.

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        Thanks for the suggestions! I’ve never read Simmons, but I’ll check this out. And Vonnegut is always fun.

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          Thanks, added to the list.

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            This seems pretty interesting. Thanks!

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            The Three Body Problem Trilogy. My favorite Sci-Fi series.

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              I’ll download it and add to the list. Thanks!

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            I’m learning to knit!

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              My mom runs a “knitting circle” up in Northern Canada, I don’t know why but it always surprises me the mix of people that show up. Young and old, male and female alike, all walks of life. She used to have a little shop that was wall to wall wool and accessories and all that. Was just crazy the wool she had. The only problem is that I’ve been waiting like 16 years for her to knit me a sweater because every time she starts knitting one someone offers a bunch of money for it when it’s done…

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                Welcome to the hobby! What are you starting out making? And if you haven’t found it already, I highly recommend ravelry for finding projects for the amount of yarn you have and your skill level.

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                  I’ve been wanting to do that! There’s a yarn store across the street from my apartment, and I feel I’m missing an opportunity…

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                    That must be very attractive to the (older) ladies. Good job :)

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                      Hey now don’t be ageist :) The fiber arts attract people of all stripes.

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                        That’s exactly it, I can already make my own cordage and crochet - I just wanna level up.

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                        I fundamentally disagree with this comment, it can appeal to anyone of any gender.

                        I recognize that you aren’t saying that, but you’re saying it explicitly should appeal to one gender more than another.

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                      If they want you to do consulting as part of your interview, they can pay.

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                        This is how I feel as well. I emailed them saying basically this: that I would be happy to prepare the presentation for my standard consulting rate. We’ll see what they say.

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                          This is what we do in our hiring process. We give the candidate 3 options:

                          • Pair-program/discuss a side-project of their own
                          • Pair-program/discuss our codebase (which is open-source)
                          • Pair-program an exercise like exercism.io (with follow-up discussion) We still didn’t decide on paying the other two, but we pay for the work they do on our project.
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                            This sounds fun, please interview me lol

                            Honestly, I have found that companies that offer a slew of offerings like this are usually have some of the best workplace cultures.

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                              I definitely feel like we do. The tech team is remote and it’s still early-days in building team culture (company is around 18 months old), so we have a lot of challenges ahead.

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                                Good luck!

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                          Nice! How do you feel about Tox in relation to Signal?

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                            I feel if something is mission critical I would use Signal or if you’re looking for something to work out of the box. Signal is a lot more mature than the Tox project in both the development of the core protocal but in the amount of users. Tox is something you should give a look to if you’re looking to work on a project while using it!

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                            At work: some react.js rubbish. Just churning out components

                            Personal:

                            • I’m working on finishing up Practical Packet Analysis.

                            • Continuing my self-lead learning of GNU Radio and Radio-wave “stuff”

                            • I’ve finally made the decision and I’m going back to school full time in January. Thankfully my parents will be able to provide me with some housing (gotta love being in your 20s). So, I guess I’m putting in my two weeks soon and hopefully some more experienced people in my life will be able to give me some knowledge on that process

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                              If you’re learning interesting things about GNU Radio, please take good notes, write blog posts, and consider publishing an ebook. There’s not a lot of on-ramps into that topic but it’s super-interesting and increasing in importance as wireless protocols get more popular.

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                                Will do! Right now I’m just kind of stumbling around trying to achieve some small goals! I’ve only sunk ~40 hours into it as of now.

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                                Seconding pushcx’s recommendation to publish notes on radio stuff. I’m looking into it as well, and would love to see more of that sort of content on Lobste.rs!

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                                  Giving your notice can be stressful, but it’s not anything to be worried about, in the long run. If you have flexibility in timing, you might think you can hold off until for a propitious moment, but the the best approach is just to tell your boss right away – the more time they have, the better they can prepare. As long as nobody blows up when you give notice, your reputation won’t suffer. Good luck.

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                                    Yeah, I’m not too stressed but more anxious since it will be my first time quitting a job. Thankfully they will have plenty of time and my timing will align with the ending of a project.

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                                  Looks like this is the PR thread that started this.

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                                    I dont think the person who sent the PR did anything wrong. Guy was just ready to blow.

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                                      Hi, I’m [the] “Guy”. Yup, certainly was ready to blow. Emails like this every weekend asking when I’m going to merge their patches is what sent me over the edge. I’ve had enough, and so I’m throwing in the towel.

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                                      I hope he doesn’t start getting more comments like this. Guy gives away free work for like almost 5 years (based on git commit logs), and some random person (with an amazon wishlist as their github homepage link no less!) comes out of the woodwork to inform him how he should feel. eye roll

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                                        I think that comment is pretty fair and the maintainer was kind of a jackass in implying guy was ruining his weekends asking how he can improve the quality of his own freely donated labor.

                                        I do find it hard not to hate any post that begins with “sigh” though.

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                                          Yeah, the sigh and the second sentence (“It looks like..”) were what chapped my caboose I think. The rest of it was pretty reasonable.

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                                          The “random person” is Rui Paulo. He is a FreeBSD core commiter for longer than 5 years!

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                                            Must have been a high quality entropy device then. :P

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                                        We do not support the use of this project in applications that violate privacy and security. We are using this to help cognitively impaired users to sense and understand the world around them.

                                        Shame they didn’t put such a stipulation on their license.

                                        What, people think that this kind of opressiontech just magically appears? If you work on these things, you’re going to contribute to the problem. We need to take more responsibility for our code.

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                                          How do you propose they go about enforcing this via their license?

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                                            The boundaries of what face-recognition means to privacy are definitely still being figured out - it’s a conversation society has been reluctant to have. Personally, I’m immensely happy to see it, for a personal reason: I often feel like I’m at a privacy disadvantage because almost anyone who’s ever met me has filed my face in their brain’s database, but prosopagnosia prevents me from doing the same for theirs. And the researcher’s statement seems to recognize the importance of that use-case, which I don’t usually see acknowledged as a thing worth caring about.

                                            Note that this is a single CMU researcher implementing a published algorithm; I don’t think this particular software release is enabling anything that wasn’t reasonably possible already, and clearly an engineer working alone isn’t in a position to formulate the guiding principles for a privacy area nobody’s feelings are clear on. And then it’s a very long way from those guiding principles to something legally meaningful. I definitely believe this conversation needs to happen, and perhaps efforts like this will motivate it.

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                                              I’m not sure that the privacy disadvantage here is well-solved by removing other people’s privacy. :(

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                                                I do agree with that.

                                                I mean, there are plenty of commercial vendors of face-recognition software designed with features that aid surveillance. I’m sure they’re already benefiting from the upstream research. And then there’s photo tagging on social networks; those companies have the resources to do this without help. These things are happening with or without open-source efforts.

                                                I’ve never seen even a single piece of software that uses face-recognition for accessibility purposes, which is the only use-case where an open-source implementation is likely to make a difference to what gets written.

                                                1. 1

                                                  The other outcome though, getting everyone to stop using Facebook and Google+ is never going to happen unfortunately.
                                                  I wonder if there have been legal cases for people trying to be untagged in photos. Probably. “Right to be untagged”?

                                              2. 4

                                                Well, Crockford has a “Do No Evil” sort of clause in the JSON license ( http://www.json.org/license.html ).

                                                IBM one day called him up and asked for a specific relicensing of it without that clause–so he dutifully elided it for them only.

                                                One can imagine something similar happening here.

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                                                  IBM being uniquely permitted to do evil because of a quirk of software licensing sounds like a premise for a hokey cyberthriller!

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                                                      I’m not a lawyer and couldn’t possibly comment on whether such vague wording will accomplish anything close to its intent. :)

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                                                  I mostly listen to the DEF CON radio on SomaFM it’s pretty great.

                                                  I actually stopped using Spotify, I don’t see the need for it. I also didn’t like the permissions update.

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                                                    Right now I’m looking into getting my amateur radio license technician class. But this weekend I’m going to a hackathon and will be making a DIY smart fridge kit.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      I was thinking about that the other day. A simple version could be a largish tablet (10"+?) with magnets stuck to the back just sitting on the fridge. It could default to either a shopping list (Todo or sketch application) or calendar app. Kind of expensive unless you happen to have an old one lying around (I didn’t :( ) and you would need some pretty strong magnets. And you might need charging every week or so? You could have a charger plugged in on the top of the fridge and dangle it down for a few hours each week when you need to charge it?

                                                    1. 6

                                                      Just re-enrolled for college. I’ve been working full time for a year now at a VoIP company and put four months into a startup that failed to launch after the other co-founder quit (I worked on the startup part time). Pretty excited, I think my life will be a bit easier once I get a degree. I’ve had interviews with good companies but my lack of formal knowledge always leads to me being embarrassed and second guessing myself in the interviews.

                                                      Other than that I’m trying to find vulnerabilities in my friend’s smart TV.

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                                                        Work: Getting prepped to help out our Java team here at work. Being a JS architect was fun but unfortunately our companies' focus is changing it and requires the project I was working on to be shelved, this is due to the lack of developers we have. I got some spiel about how people think I’m a quick and efficient dev, but sometimes you just have to think if people are BS-ing you.

                                                        Personal: I’m looking to get into SICP now that I have some free time again. I love FP and potentially would like to work on some projects with it. I’ve used Haskell before and loved it! I feel like LISP is used more than Haskell/ML languages though and could potentially lead to me having more opportunities knowing LISP (clojure and scheme are the goals).

                                                        As someone looking to get into compilers where is a good starting point?

                                                        1. 4

                                                          Sympathies about the work thing. It sounds like you already know plenty of languages and Java will be no different; try not to stress about condescending explanations from higher-ups, it doesn’t lead anywhere good.

                                                          Looking to get into compilers…

                                                          I learned from the dragon book, but I don’t think it’s actually that great didactically, and today there are better ones. Still, it was updated nine years ago, which is not very long as that field goes: http://www.amazon.com/Compilers-Principles-Techniques-Tools-2nd/dp/0321486811/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1428946675&sr=8-1&keywords=dragon+book+aho+sethi+ullman

                                                          Andrew Appel has one which I find quite pleasant to read, although I haven’t worked through it. As the title suggests, you will get a lot more out of this if you already know ML, although knowing Haskell is close enough: http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Compiler-Implementation-Andrew-Appel/dp/0521607647/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1428946726&sr=8-4&keywords=appel+compilers

                                                          Depending on how strongly interested you are in functional programming with static types specifically, you may find some books on type theory to be useful. Note that whether this is relevant depends on what language you want to compile! Benjamin Pierce has two books which are essentially the standard intro surveys to this area: http://www.amazon.com/Types-Programming-Languages-Benjamin-Pierce/dp/0262162091/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1428946869&sr=8-1&keywords=benjamin+pierce http://www.amazon.com/Types-Programming-Languages-Benjamin-Pierce/dp/0262162091/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1428946869&sr=8-1&keywords=benjamin+pierce

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                                                            Thank you for your input!

                                                            I’ve herd very good things about the dragon book, a lot of people I interact with have used it.

                                                            I’m definitely interested in the second book you listed and will probably end up getting it!

                                                            I already own: http://www.amazon.com/Engineering-Compiler-Second-Keith-Cooper/dp/012088478X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1429031359&sr=8-1&keywords=engineering+a+compiler, but have no progress with it yet (this is slated to start around summer time).

                                                          2. 2

                                                            the comments here have a good collection of links: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=398569

                                                            i’m a big fan of ghuloum’s “an incremental approach to compiler construction” paper personally: http://scheme2006.cs.uchicago.edu/11-ghuloum.pdf - if i ever get around to writing a compiler i’ll almost certainly start by following the approach he outlines.

                                                            i also have a lot of respect for james hague’s opinions on stuff; here’s what he has to suggest: http://prog21.dadgum.com/30.html

                                                            and finally, though it deals with interpretation, shriram krishnamurthi’s “programming languages: application and interpretation” is well worth reading: http://cs.brown.edu/courses/cs173/2012/book/

                                                            (as a very opinionated aside, you should look into either some dialect of ML or racket as an implementation language)

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Got to this thread a bit late… oops!

                                                            At work I’m working on getting into Functional Reactive Programming with JavaScript. I’ll be implementing Bacon.js into our standing project. Right now we have too many events firing, functions being called more than they need to and just returning empty since they don’t need to be utilized, etc. I’m hoping implementing FRx will help make the code more maintainable for the other developers and help me learn about more methods of development (which it is proving to do).

                                                            At home I’m trying to relax more, I’m going through that stage right before you turn 21 where you feel young but you’re also reminiscing over life and thus you feel old but you know you aren’t. It’s hard to balance relaxing with progressing rapidly, since I love to learn and try to be actively making things as often as possible.

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                                                              will the /hypertext redirect still in the future? I run a scraper of lobste.rs and the BBS front page kind of brought it down for a bit :(

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                                                                Why are you scraping stuff? There is a JSON interface at https://lobste.rs/hottest.json (and other similar URLs with a .json extension) which was never changed.

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                                                                Mine is the quadtree. I remember “first” learning about them at a hackathon. Someone implemented a quadtree within WebGL for a simple cube game and I thought it was the wildest thing. Since then I’ve spent more time learning about them and even implemented a few in production at my current posting. Quadtrees, like most data structures, are situational though so I don’t always get the joy of playing with them. I also like that the same principles can be taken and applied to an octree for three dimensional space.

                                                                1. 6

                                                                  Heh! Mine is the R* tree, which, like the quadtree, is a spatial index, but it uses adaptive regions that may overlap, in contrast to the quadtree’s exhaustive partition. This gives it some stronger guarantees about worst-case performance, at the cost of a bunch of complexity such as rebalancing the tree dynamically.

                                                                  Today there’s a nice Wikipedia page about it, but there wasn’t when I first learned (I’m not sure how long ago it was). It was one of my first experiences with implementing an algorithm directly from the papers about it, so I remember it fondly. :)

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                                                                    R* tree is mine as well for very similar reasons :)

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  Working on architecting a new project for my day job, planning my trip to Denmark, and writing a “myanimelist.com” for movies. Probably going to submit a PR to LightTable to enable node in -debug.

                                                                  1. 2

                                                                    I’m working on invitable an invitation queue to help clean up the hackathon hackers facebook group (S/O to my fellow hackathoners). We experienced some trivial problems (someone pushed four different versions of jQuery) but that’s okay because I want it to be a learning experience for those less knowledgeable than me because I don’t know everything either!

                                                                    At work I’m working on implementing some trivial API calls, and hopefully that will be it.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      I don’t understand how anyone would agree with the fact that all our information should be insecure, or open to someone else to help catch criminals, who may not even be in the wrong (I guess someone who is like alleged). While I understand the importance of stopping criminals maybe we should live in a preventative society instead of a reactive (in terms of handling crime).

                                                                      1. 4

                                                                        This week I’m working on learning Haskell via implementing a web application in it. I will be creating a Twitter clone using the Scotty framework. I’ve figured out DB inserts, but now I am stuck on DB selects. I did some Stack Overflowing and it appears that I need to do some monad magic.

                                                                        As far as work is concerned I’ll be switching to the API team for a bit because they’re moving quite slow, which is frankly annoying because I strongly dislike java :(

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                                                                          Waiting for, receiving, and then setting up my new MacBook Air in anticipation of an upcoming hackathon.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            $work I’ve finished the base line web app for data transparency. Learning angular was a bit hard, but I’m glad I did it. I’m now working on adding other widgets to make the interface more friendly such as a boostrapped date-picker, pdf viewer of the current page, and enabling text notifications for the progress of a file.