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    I’m going to work on my blog, I think – I’m redesigning it right now!

    I also might make some bread

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      Neither https://acdw.net/ nor https://www.acdw.net/ seem to resolve for me, have you taken your blog down while you redesign it? I got the link off your lobste.rs profile

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      I’m working on some more posts for my blog as part of 100DaysToOffload, catching up with some friends, and playing some video games.

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        Can anyone share what’s the difference between Netlify and Vercel?

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          They seem roughly equivalent to me. There’s probably a few features than one has over the other, but that comes down to nuance, and if there’s something specific you need to do.

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          I’m not surprised Kubernetes was slow, it seems comically overkill for a static site.

          Though my static website, which I’ve put no effort into optimising beyond setting some cache headers, also gets a score of 100 from Google PageSpeed Insights, and is just running on a single VPS (and in fact does better on some of the metrics). Is the advantage of Vercel that you don’t even need the VPS?

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            For me is it serverless aproach (no pain with VPS administration) and CDN (Edge network)

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              I was only using Kubernetes as impetus to learn more about it, and have fun with it, rather than for performance. It is definitely overkill for a static site!

              There’s a few advantages to Vercel:

              • Your static site gets replicated to the edge network, so should load quickly regardless of location
              • If you want to host serverless functions, you can do that pretty easily
              • Astonishingly fast build times
              • Zero configuration, you just point it to a GitHub repository, and if you’re using any of the major static site generators, it should just work it out and build it
              • It’s mostly free, there’s limits but I’ve never hit them. Rather than paying $5/m for a VPS, you pay nothing
            1. 2

              A couple of static blog-like sites, a wiki, a Scuttlebutt pub, an IRC server + web client, a code-server instance, and a small file drop.

              Everything actually runs on a server at home, connected to a Vultr VPS with WireGuard and proxied via nginx or haproxy depending on whether the thing talks HTTP or something over TCP. The VPS also holds a wildcard cert so I can put all the web apps on dedicated domains so basic web security primitives in the browser work.

              SSH ProxyJump gives me a shell on my home machine when I’m out and about, Every host runs firewalld and tallow, public IP or not.

              I’m spinning up osquery and remote log shipping for a smidge more security during or after the inevitable break in right now. I also have vague plans for a Consul setup to get away from my hand-rolled proxy configs and host IPs, but given the small number of apps and backend hosts it hasn’t been essential.

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                Do you use your Vultr VPS for privacy or for NAT-punching?

                I’ve thought about putting a VPS in front of my home infrastructure, but I haven’t had any issues using dynamic DNS or otherwise exposing it publicly.

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                  Both! I definitely like having an IP address unassociated with my home infrastructure attached to public DNS, and likewise find it easier to punch through the dual-NAT (ISP gateway and my home network router/firewall) in front of my machines via a dedicated WG link. It also makes port mapping for new services trivial, since anything exposed on the WireGuard interface of my home server(s) is automatically routable from the public VPS.

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                I came across Vercel a couple of times. I’m interested in CDN as a service providers, but it makes me kind of sad to see that Vercel doesn’t support IPv6 at all. In my opinion supporting IPv6 is a must for any new service in the networking segment.

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                  Netlify offers similar features to Vercel, and it looks like they do support IPv6, although it is opt-in.

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                  I picked up Dune over the holiday period, but it feels pretty slow going so far, although I’ve heard such great things I’m going to push through.

                  Otherwise, I’ve also been going through programming Phoenix 1.4, to get more up to speed with Phoenix and start writing more Elixir in my spare time.

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                    Dune is fantastic, though it pays to remember the era in which it was written.

                    I will say though, and with sadness, that the sequels were just…not good (obviously that’s subjective but a lot of people seem to agree).

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                      I thought Dune Messiah felt like the actual ending to Dune. Like the publishers cut it out of the first one and then turned it into another book after Dune got popular. It was much less action and a lot more internal philosophizing though.

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                      I started reading Dune a month ago but abandoned it midway through because it was not interesting. I know, I know… I would highly recommend Children Of Time by Adrian Chaikovsky.

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                        I read Children of Time and it’s sequel Children of Ruin, and I absolutely loved every minute of it, I couldn’t get enough!

                        Are there any other books that you enjoyed as much?

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                        Dune’s on my list of books to read next.

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                          Just read Dune too. And I’ve been working on my Phoenix skills as well. Almost done with Programming Ecto and it surprisingly has made me feel much more confident with Phoenix than the Phoenix book. Understanding the data portion of applications always seems to make things click for me.

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                            I re-read Dune and Heretics of Dune (the first book in the series I read) and Dune is the real deal. It’s essential (English-language) SF!

                            http://gerikson.com/blog/books/read/Dune-and-Heretics.html

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                            Here’s mine: https://hugo.md/

                            It’s gone through a few iterations. I’m using Hugo with the Hello Friend theme, with a few modifications to add support for webmentions, and handle system theme changes.

                            I typically take existing themes and tweak them because I feel like I don’t have the free time to rebuild it entirely, but maybe this thread is good inspiration to make some time.

                            It’s hosted on DigitalOcean Kubernetes, despite being a static site, I still like to make curl -L hugo.md available, although someone did mention that Netlify can handle routing based on user agent as well.

                            Be gentle! 😅

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                              Not sure where it’s hosted, but it’s kinda slow? (I’m in Germany). Definitely feels more like “underperforming CMS with database” than static site. But when it’s done loading, no complaints :)

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                                Thanks for the feedback! That’s probably because it’s hosted in Singapore, but this is probably a good reason to move to Netlify, or host it on a CDN.

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                                How do you host a static site on k8s? Do you self host the k8s?

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                                  How do you host a static site on k8s?

                                  I’m not sure what the typical workflow is, but at the moment I just run nginx in a Docker container serving the static site. If I were running more, I’d probably have a dedicated nginx container with storage backing for each site, or just proxy traffic to a storage service (some S3-compatible API).

                                  Here’s the Dockerfile if you want to take a look: https://github.com/hugomd/blog/blob/develop/Dockerfile

                                  Unfortunately, this means the request path has an extra hop: Internet -> DigitalOcean load balancer -> nginx ingress -> nginx

                                  Do you self host the k8s?

                                  I run Kubernetes at home on an Intel NUC, just a single node at the moment but I’ve been meaning to add more nodes to the cluster. I typically use it as a testing ground for new deployments, and use DigitalOcean Kubernetes as “production”, for my blog and other services.

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                                I have an account on a mastodon instance on sdf. I barely ever use it, but I can’t imagine why a service like that (that runs on limited budget) is wasting resources running mastodon instead of pleroma.

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                                  I expect it’s because Mastodon came out first, and more people have experience running it in production.

                                  Additionally, if you’re running a service for a fair amount of users, there’s a bit more involved migrating that many users than migrating a single user, which is what the OP did in their post. More can go wrong. Maybe this falls in line with “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”.

                                  That said, if the cost of running Pleroma was significantly less than Mastodon it might be worth the hassle.

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                                  This looks great, I was looking at Mutt the other day but wasn’t sure that much had changed since I last used it. I’ll be checking this out!

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                                    This is neat. I do the same thing at home but with inlets, it’s just as simple, except you need to manage a VPS.

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                                      This is particularly interesting in countries like Switzerland where there are multiple official languages. While German is the most commonly spoken, there are large populations that speak French and Italian, and a minority that speaks Romansh.

                                      For the most part, Swiss website will prompt you on entry to select one of the 3 major languages, and if not they will have an easy to see language selector at the top of the page.

                                      Accessing websites not based in Switzerland is a completely different ballgame though, with most defaulting to German..