1. 39

    I’d prefer every downvote to cost karma points for the downvoter as well (not just for the downvotee).

    1. 11

      Maybe not cost, but those who flag a lot should get the same banner. Perhaps they already do. I haven’t flagged or seen that banner before.

      1. 4

        It’s an interesting idea (though I can think of a few downsides as well). It adds a cost to flagging. Though I’m not sure how effective it would be on heated discussions with minority viewpoints where the commenter will feel the brunt of the flags but each flag costs a user a single point of karma.

        1. 3

          It adds a cost to flagging.

          That’s exactly the point - to prevent people from blindly flagging everything they disagree with.

          1. 1

            Indeed, that was in agreement, apologies.

          2. 2

            Maybe we could play with the concept of “refunds” where an administrator certifying a flag (i.e. spam or self-promo) would give the karma back? Limiting the scope of said refunds would also prevent any ethical quandaries for the administrators.

            1. 1

              I thought about this as well, but this then places additional work on the admins or mods to actually go back and mark a flagged comment is valid. I also presume, especially because of the current usage of flags being used as “disagree” buttons, that many comments are flagged in a day. Hopefully a “currency” style of flagging helps, but I’m not certain.

          3. 2

            Feels a bit punitive. You can get a similar effect by having different downvotes weighted differently. E.g, every user has a base outgoing downvote scale of 1, each of your downvotes in a given calendar day has a base downvote power of the inverse of the number of downvotes you cast that day. That is: if you cast 2 downvotes in a day, each one has a base power of 0.5; if you cast 10 downvotes in a day each one has a base power of 0.1. That way people can just cast as many downvotes as suits the way they use the site, but the mechanics don’t add an incentive to cast more downvotes.

            You could also take the base power of a downvote in a given thread and multiply it by the total number of upvotes that user received in that thread on that day. Or like, score every user according to pagerank for each topic and weight their actions based on their relative expertise in that topic (although that probably favors old accounts)

            This is all assuming “democratic discourse” actually works, which I’m not particularly convinced of. It seems that on all the sites that structure discourse by popularity that a form of tyranny of the majority takes hold, and gets more and more severe as that network grows.

            1. 2

              That you refer to flagging (i.e. identifying something as inappropriate) as “downvoting” is the key take away here, IMO.

              I don’t know what the official word is, but my view is that if you flag something because you disagree with it, you’re Doing It Wrong (TM).

              1. 1

                Which was the key issue here. If we let everyone “flag” things and give that flag any authority (such as, suggesting that a user takes a break or deletes their account), then we’ll just end up with like-minded people that only approve of each-others thoughts. If, on the other hand, we make this a signal for the mods, then the mods get the banner in question, the mods can have further authority to decide if this really is an issue. Context matters, and flags or downvotes system do not look at context.

                1. 1

                  I think it is mostly a signal for mods now. But while Lobsters has an upvote, but no downvote, people are going to mis-use the flags to indicate “I disagree with this”.

            1. 19

              I enjoy the ESP32 boards quite a bit. They are very cheap, they come with WiFi and BT built in, and you can write either C or Arduino code for them.

              There are the older esp8266 boards but they lack some cool power management stuff the newer ESP32 boards have.

              1. 3

                They also come with a pretty nice SDK - it’s usually the bane of the smaller boards, that the SDKs are terrible or you end up having to write a whole lotta a drivers yourself, which isn’t what I find fun ;-)

                1. 1

                  I agree, the ESP32-IDF SDK is surprisingly pleasant. But there are some other embedded SDKs that seem nice too, like Zephyr and mbedOS, that support a lot of popular ARM-based boards. (Though I haven’t actually used them.)

                2. 3

                  I have a bunch of the ESP8266s flashed with Tasmota, on breadboards with a Dallas temperature sensor for monitoring stuff around the house.

                  One of them has a relay which controls my garage door in parallel with the garage door switch at the wall. I have a few that are embedded in “smart outlets” bought from Amazon that I flashed Tasmota over-the-air as to avoid closed source firmware.

                  All of these are connected to my Hubitat for automation and pushing temps to InfluxDB. Here is a snapshot of one of my Grafana dashboards: https://snapshot.raintank.io/dashboard/snapshot/jzZznlmjEWaatSNw1AbN2znAPcC4N8wE

                  1. 2

                    Hubitat rules so hard.

                    1. 1

                      I bought the C5 shortly after it was released and they have done a great job improving it over time, the web UI is lot more responsive than it used to be and there has been a steady flow of sane features while still keeping it rather simple/focused. I like it a lot!

                      1. 2

                        My only real issue is that geofencing with the mobile app doesn’t work consistently. Everything else is extremely reliable.

                        1. 2

                          Agreed, forgot about geofencing… My current workaround is the OwnTracks phone app with OwnTracks Presence app for Hubitat: https://github.com/bdwilson/hubitat/tree/master/OwnTracks-Presence - the downside is battery consumption on my phone is higher. I also use an app for presence based on WiFi since my phone has a static IP on my LAN.

                  2. 2

                    For the embedded category I really like the Nordic nRF52 chips. Well supported in Rust, nice bunch of peripherals onboard, debugging with OpenOCD+gdb works well, official docs are nice. Supports BLE, 802.15.4, ESB for radio. No Wi-Fi but that only makes everything lighter.

                    1. 1

                      That’s what I’ve started with, and they are fun for sure. I went with the Adafruit Huzzah32 boards, for a nice combination of features and low-enough price. (Might use something else if making a bunch of something.)

                      Next up, using uLisp on the one I’ve got on order.

                      1. 1

                        Alternative: WFI32

                      1. 7

                        Sourcehut began to silently support this last week as well, as the appropriate libraries used to validate SSH keys got updated. Sadly work on supporting FIDO2 as a second factor is blocked by the combination of the insistence that every feature of Sourcehut works without JS and Webauthn lacking a non-JS way to use it.

                        1. 2

                          the insistence that every feature of Sourcehut works without JS

                          This is one of the reasons why Sourcehut is appealing to me.

                        1. 2

                          I don’t have a strong opinion on this, but I like your effort :)

                          1. 2

                            For those wondering what’s inside:

                            A raspberrypi 4 is the brain of the project. Everything runs on Python […]

                            1. 1

                              I remember doing something waaay simpler on a PIC18F4550 for a uni project.

                              As cool as it may be, I found it one of the most frustrating projects I’ve ever built.

                              1. 1

                                Was that in assembly?

                                All these bank selections a PIC needs seem to be not very convenient for both humans and compilers…

                                1. 1

                                  Yes it was.

                                  Inconvenient indeed.

                              1. 1

                                I’m using mailbox.org:

                                • Privacy: good (e.g. you can encrypt all incoming mails with a GPG key)
                                • Cost: 1 EUR/month
                                • Reliability/Longevity of the service: I had maybe 1-2 hours outage in the last 2 years or so
                                • Features: several, but I don’t use them

                                If you don’t have a domain you can still generate random aliases (@temp.mailbox.org). However, these random aliases will be deleted after a month. So it’s probably not the behavior you want.

                                (Btw. friend invitations include 3 months for free. Drop me a PM if you need one).

                                1. 10

                                  1+ for including Forth.

                                  I wonder if it’s feasible to transpile Forth to CPython’s VM (or vice versa) since they are both stack based…

                                  1. 7

                                    1+

                                    I see what you did there.

                                    1. 3

                                      I’ve actually wondered the opposite before: could Forth be an extensible, bare metal VM for some stack machine based languages?

                                      1. 1

                                        Does CPython’s VM contain registers? Forth isn’t just “stack based”, just operations are performed on it. The canonical Forth virtual machine has two stacks.

                                      1. 16

                                        Just in case you want a visual on that, here is a German article with a picture of the burnt down SBG2 datacentre. Doesn’t look good.

                                        1. 2

                                          Some people have enough self-mockery to make fun of it:

                                          https://pr0gramm.com/

                                          1. 3

                                            yeah but these guys have offsite backups.. so apparently memes have more technical knowledge and backups

                                          1. -1

                                            FYI I am flagging this as the full drewdevault.com domain was banned from lobste.rs. I expect the admins to remove your post or ban you for posting those blog posts.

                                            1. 5

                                              Flagging it as what? None of the categories is appropriate. I find your desire for some post to be deleted or a person to be banned for posting something relevant appalling.

                                              1. 4

                                                I wouldn’t expect a ban if someone didn’t know. It’s probably confusing to post something from someone who can’t respond, however.

                                                1. 3

                                                  Why was it banned? I don’t see a mention of the ban anywhere in the rules…

                                                  1. 3

                                                    Among the top 3 results here

                                                    https://lobste.rs/moderations?moderator=pushcx&what%5Bdomains%5D=domains

                                                    However it just refers to top-level submissions, links in comments are fine.

                                                  2. 1

                                                    Sorry.

                                                    I knew this domain was banned for submissions, but I thought links to specific (on topic) posts are OK.

                                                    Btw: I just upvoted your explanation because I appreciate it :)

                                                    1. 0

                                                      Just to be clear I am being annoying on purpose because I don’t like the fact that the admin bans the entire domain on a power trip for no reason at all just because he has a personal problem with the author (who isn’t even the one posting the links to that domain on lobste.rs). I thought that this website is different and community moderated but sadly it isn’t and the moderation suffers from all the same problems as everywhere else. I don’t actually see anything wrong with the domain, its content or your comment. I just don’t like the admin who is being petty and if he wants to act like this then he should manage his own RSS subscription and not this website.

                                                1. 2

                                                  I’ve heard that DeepMind uses it, or some derivative of it. I think the guy who invented it at Apple got hired by Google.

                                                  1. 5

                                                    That guy was Chris Lattner. He and others developed Swift for Tensorflow with it, but it got archived last month. I dont know if they still use it internally.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      He and others developed Swift

                                                      and LLVM ;)

                                                  1. 9

                                                    I’ve been waiting for episode 2 of this to drop for 3 years 😂

                                                    1. 3

                                                      There’s a “drop” word joke here.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        glad you could pick it out? I hope it didn’t cause your eyes to roll?

                                                        1. 3

                                                          Thx, I didn’t catch that.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        The group consisted of about 40 members with almost the same number of opinions

                                                        Seems like not much changed since then…

                                                        1. 1

                                                          I played with bridge in the past. It’s basically a software-defined ethernet cable.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            With the caveat that I haven’t dealt with the OpenBSD feature in question here (only what I think is the corresponding Linux functionality), isn’t it more like a software-defined ethernet switch?

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Indeed. However, hub is even closer:

                                                              This link between the interfaces selectively forwards frames from each interface on the bridge to every other interface on the bridge.

                                                              This would be a “cable”: https://man.openbsd.org/pair.4

                                                              1. 1

                                                                Hmm, now I’m confused…

                                                                veb(4) states:

                                                                veb is a learning bridge that maintains a table of Ethernet addresses and the port that each address is reachable with.

                                                                bridge(4) says:

                                                                In general a bridge works like a hub, forwarding traffic from one interface to another. It differs from a hub in that it will “learn” which machines are on each of its attached segments by actively listening to incoming traffic and examining the headers of each frame. A table is built containing the MAC address and segment to which the MAC address is attached.

                                                                I thought having a forwarding database and learning mac/port associations (and using it for selective forwarding) was the main thing differentiating a switch from a hub?

                                                          1. 4

                                                            Never understood the need for “markdown editors”. Isn’t it simple enough to use your everyday text editor?

                                                            1. 4

                                                              Because it’s super useful for someone non-tech.

                                                              Using this app you send .md files to your coworkers. Alternatives are:

                                                              • .txt (no formating);
                                                              • .docx (requires a software using 2GB of RAM and that isn’t version control friendly);
                                                              • LaTeX (requires huge software suite and even wysiwyg are complex enough that you need to get used to them);
                                                              • ???.

                                                              All in all I find it’s a good way to spread the use for markdown.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                That’s what I was doing for 4 years (vim), but live preview and easy copy and paste with the mouse makes writing significantly faster. Copy and paste is more annoying in Vim (because it’s modal and I use the terminal, not gvim), and I realized that the writing process involves extreme amounts of copying between different drafts, from the web, from code examples, etc.

                                                                I’m fastest with vim for code, but not for writing blog posts

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  For pulling copy/paste in from other environments, I’ve found the defining :Copy and :Paste commands to interact with the system clipboard to be really helpful. It’s taken me from “Vim is hard to copy/paste” to “I can copy anything up to, and including terminal output”.

                                                                  From my .vimrc

                                                                  command! Paste :normal "+p
                                                                  command! -range Copy :'<,'>y +
                                                                  
                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Thanks! I tried it and it does work. (It’s funny that after using Vim for 15 years I have no idea how any of that works :-/ )

                                                                    Still I think I prefer mouse-based copy-and-paste for blog writing. I have a keyboard-only workflow for code, but writing pulls in content from many different sources, and the revision process is very different.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Totally fair, just thought I’d share something I’d found very useful

                                                                    2. 1

                                                                      With

                                                                      set clipboard=unnamed
                                                                      

                                                                      and xsel being installed you can share the Vim and X clipboards.

                                                                  2. 1

                                                                    I use VS Code + the built in preview. Has worked excellently for years.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    I assumed Matrix can do video streaming by itself. Seems like you still need another service, e.g. Jitsi.

                                                                    1. 4

                                                                      Another bouncer mentioned here is pounce: https://lobste.rs/s/aezalh/pounce_new_irc_bouncer

                                                                      It supports pledge system calls which might resonate well with OpenBSD users.

                                                                      1. 3

                                                                        I was looking around for bouncers yesterday, and also tried pounce, but it depends on “libtls” which makes it harder to install. soju was surprisingly easy, and a lot more comfortable than ZNC.

                                                                      1. 5

                                                                        This was the bug:

                                                                        New threads were not calling _fpreset() when they were constructed, which “reinitializes the floating-point math package”. This would mean that the default values used within floating point arithmetic would be slightly different when you were inside a thread.

                                                                        1. 2

                                                                          There is an XKCD for this…

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Are there similar tools for other languages?

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              Rust’s warnings for dead code are fairly aggressive. For example, enum variants are warned dead even if they are mentioned in the source code, if they are not constructed, so that matching codes can be deleted once constructing codes are deleted. But Rust is not a pure language so there are limits.