Threads for icosahedron

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    +1. This really helped.

    The single best solution I’ve found is just to keep stuff out, so I ordered a silicone cover for my MBP keyboard, and it hasn’t had any problems since Apple replaced it.

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      Awesome. Good to know!

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      tmux is the one for me. It really changed the game for me. Multiplexing terminals has been so crucial in delineating my work. I wear a few different hats at work so its nice to just switch between terminals with ease.

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        I find mosh coupled with tmux is invaluable.

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          I’ve never given mosh a proper look but reading about it now, this seems extremely valuable.

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          How do deal with scrolling and copy+paste?

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            You can create bindings for tmux that allow you to do vim-style copy and paste.

            Scrolling is built into tmux, ctrl + [ and then just page up / page down.

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              Tmux has bindings for that. Iirc the default backscroll thingie is ctrl+[

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                I set my terminal emu’s scroll back to 0 and have bindings for the scroll wheel events. Setting console scrollback to 0 is important cause otherwise the terminal will try to scroll too.

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              Clojure, Spacemacs, CIDER and emacs for sure.

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                Do you find that spec is a good substitute for a type system?

                I’m working on a system that is growing larger, and I wonder if I’m going to start finding the dynamic language scaling problems soon? I’m looking into spec as a viable solution.

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                  Yes, but as always, it all depends on your objectives and problems.

                  From a practical point of view, without getting into the dynamic vs. static analysis rabbit hole, I use spec for data validation, documentation generation and testing. I mostly write business software (accounting, billing, payments) but these are generic activities you can do for whatever domain you are working on (ie. space travel).

                  I value the production-quality tools available (generative testing, database testing, data validation, Swagger generation, etc.) as these have saved me years of life.

                  My takeaway is that software correctness is achieved by defining the rules by which you will test it and running those tests. It does not have anything to do with dynamic or static typing. Spec allows you to approach defining and testing software rules in a scientific way using declarative rules, generative testing and not a lot of lines of code.

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                The video game Hacker by Activision was the first “hacking simulator” I played (in 1985). It wasn’t very realistic, but it was fun.

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                  There was hacker and hacker 2 by them. Mostly guessing iirc. I’d suggest doing a solved CTF challenge by hand in an area of hacking the OP is interested in learning about.

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                  OneNote. I wish the cross-platform situation was better, but it has by far the best experience.

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                    What platform is not available? I doubt there is a linux native client, but the web version works really well.

                    I have it on Mac, iOS, Windows 10, and the web, and I’ve never had any issues. Syncs well and just works.

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                      AFAIK linking between notes is and has been broken for years on Android. They might have fixed it now for what I know.

                      That said this reminds me that I am now on iOS and can try of linking between notes work there.

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                    I liked the “Programming Paradigms for Dummies” paper. https://www.info.ucl.ac.be/~pvr/VanRoyChapter.pdf

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                      While you’re waiting, I would hit up practice interviewing sites too. My favorite is interviewing.io, but Pramp is good too.

                      And practice being the interviewer, not just the interviewee. It helps others and you get to sit on the other side and see what you think a good interview looks like.

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                        I’ve been on the waiting list for interviewing.io for a while but no love yet. Is there a way to send invites if you already have an account?

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                        I dropped out of college during the tech boom of the late 1990’s and have been gainfully employed ever since. I’m lucky to have been very successful in my career without having had a degree. I ended up going back to college in my 30’s primarily because (a) I had kids and I want them to want to go to college and (b) if the shit ever really hits the fan and I need a job I don’t want to be excluded solely because I didn’t check some box on some application.

                        To that end, I ended up going with WGU. It’s not the most respected institution, but it’s non-profit, accredited, classes are available at any time, and you can test out of a class at the moment you feel ready. Since my only goals were to be able to check a box and say I did it, it made sense for me. The quality of the education wasn’t spectacular, but I’m also looking at it through the lens of 20 years’ experience so I suppose it’s not surprising that I already knew most everything.

                        (I will admit that, sadly, I did learn something from one of the management classes and now have to admit that maybe there is something to all that management bullshit after all.)

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                          Sounds like you were in a really similar situation! I’m definitely going about it in a similar way where price is the biggest factor for me (assuming the institution is properly accredited). It’s also nice to hear it from your perspective; my biggest fear is that I’m blowing away money on something that’s not worth it.

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                            Same here. What I found though is I really like learning again, now that it isn’t mandatory, so I’m continuing on to get the MS (from another institution).

                            In the mean time, I’ve been doing Coursera specializations to brush up on things I think will be in the MS degree program.