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    Reading Art of Postgres book & going on walks. I also want to finally extend my wiki parser.

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      Am I the only one who is really turned off by this trend of tiering/bundling books? I get some of the reasons behind it, and logically it makes sense. But I just feel like it’s such a blatant money grab that I’m hesitant to buy at all, even at price levels I’d otherwise be fine with.

      I certainly don’t begrudge an author wanting to make a living (or even just some side income) off of their work, but these almost universally have been for an ebook download or glued-together paperback, written by tech people with little to no publication history, opting out of using a publisher (which can be fine, but raises questions as to if/how well the book has been edited), and asking what I’d consider a price point for a well established textbook in a decent quality hardback binding.

      1. 2

        I’m a freelance writer, tech guy, and I’ve written several books. In addition, I’ve hung out with a lot of guys who do this bundling stuff.

        What can I say? These folks are responding to market pressures. Same thing is happening in the fiction world: authors don’t write a book, they write a series of books. Then there’s a movie tie-in, an audiobook, and so forth.

        I don’t understand your comment about the price point being what you’d expect for a nicely-bound textbook. Who the heck cares about book binding? I judge a book almost entirely by how easy it is to consume and how it makes me feel while reading it. I’ve never considered binding or hardback/softback to be important at all.

        By the way, I don’t like this business model either. I decided with my books to charge a huge amount of money. If I sell only 50 a year or some such, then those 50 people will spend the time and I’ll have the bandwidth to help them out if they’re not getting any value from the book. The way I’ve got the economics figured, if you’re aiming to sell ten thousand books at $1.99 or something, you’re firmly on the treadmill to do all of that other stuff too. Some authors realize that and some don’t, but serious authors are aware that this is the way it works before they write the first page.

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          As to binding:

          1. If I bother with a hardcopy of a book it’s generally because I feel it’s something worth keeping around, and decent quality hardcovers are more durable over the long term.
          2. I also just consider it a signal of some reasonable production quality. Perfect bound paperbacks have a pretty broad range of quality, from quite good to pages fall out within the first few times you open it. If you’re buying from an established publisher you generally have some sense upfront what to expect. With something self published, you don’t, so hardcover is a t least a signal that they didn’t just go with the cheapest option.
          1. 1

            I have no idea how many books I’ve bought over the years. Maybe a bit more than 2,000?

            I can’t think of any time the binding meant anything to me, and I like physical books much more than e-books.

            I guess that’s wrong. There have been a few times that the binding stood in stark contrast with the material inside. There are the books with the comic book font, soft-bound with big letters and pictures that contained some fantastically-deep thoughts and improved my life. There are the books that look as if they should be college textbooks, full of half-baked groupthink that I considered a waste of time.

            And the blurbs. Wow. The book blurbs always over-promise.

            Having said that, I do enjoy a nicely-put-together book now and then, but I enjoy it as a piece of art, not for being quality reading material. Oddly enough, the more I learned about books and publishing, the more I learned that most books are not bought to be read! Instead, they’re bought for the feeling that the purchaser thinks that owning the book will give them. Most, if not all, books, exist to sit on bookshelves, either in the owner’s house or in their cubicle.

      2. 1

        How do you like the book so far? Recommended?

        1. 2

          Just started it but I like how example driven it is.

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        You make a really good case about why Hugo is failing it’s users here, but I’m concerned that you may one day be saying the same about Zola. One thing that comes to mind is missing features. For example, you might decide that you want to be able to add footnotes, but CommonMark doesn’t have that functionality. Because Zola has no extensibility, you’re SOL as far as I can tell. I also have a suspicion that people might start to use themes as a way to emulate plugins. Something like the difficulty of adding graph tags that you talked about could maybe be solved like that. But then it’s getting into the danger zone of finding documentation in multiple places and having to magically override things again. I think that KayodeLycaon was spot on in pointing out that everyone wants something slightly different. I hope Zola works out for you :)

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          Yep, the concerns are valid. I don’t have a really good reply to that, but I hope this works out. Ultimately if this required another refactor then I’ll bite the bullet to make my own SSG. Not thinking too much about that situation now, though :)

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            I also have a suspicion that people might start to use themes as a way to emulate plugins.

            You said something I had trouble articulating for a long time. The problem with a Turing-complete template processor as a sole extensibility mechanism is that presentation and logic are no longer orthogonal.

            That is why I chose not to use either Zola or Hugo for a refresh of my own site setup, but went for writing an SSG that is statically linked but extensible with Lua plugins via an embedded interpreter. </shamelessPlug> ;)

            Nothing against Zola or its users though, it’s a good project.

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              Just as a small note, Zola totally does footnotes. I think there might be a page that lists which extensions pulldown-cmark enables out of the box. But your main point stands with or without this example :)

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                As a Zola user who used several other solutions before, I’m 100% sure I’ll get tired of it. I already had to hack around limitations (or my lack of knowledge) while my blog is super simple. But it’s all about gaining some time.

                I know that at some point I’ll have to do the switch to either another existing system or to one I’ll make. But I don’t spend time on that now and having a blog whose content is only in markdown and related images will make it easy if I decide to keep the content.

                Zola is temporary but it’s easy to set up, and should be easy enough to replace when time has come.

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                We have considered OCaml but went for F# instead. I could not be happier. Great libraries, good tooling, in 2020 F# is a first class citizen in the cloud thanks to C# and .NET Core. You can develop on Linux, Windows, MacOS and without modification it works. Compilation times are great. Unless you want to deal with the low level nature and the C++ influence in Rust F# is a much more logical step to move from OCaml. There is dotnet fsi for REPL too. I really like OCaml, it was my first ML language but it is not great for cloud computing or anything where you do not want to write a ton of code that has nothing to do with your business problem, because there aren’t many libraries. F# has access to C# libraries and it is relatively easy to write a thin wrapper that convert nulls to Nones, so you are null safe or C# style functions to ML style functions so you can use |> or <| etc. Out frontend is in Elm and we follow elm-format style in F# (manually though) so our codebases look very similar.

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                  What’s your problem domain? I will use F# at a new job, and I would love to hear which libraries & frameworks you love, and which resources are good for learning.

                  For context, I already know Elm very well, and Haskell at an intermediate level. I also plan to work through “domain modelling made functional”.

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                    SAAS, energy, finance.

                    I could collect some of the libraries for you.

                    1. 1

                      That would be awesome! I’m especially interested in what stands out, or strong opinions you have derived from your experience. I’m sure I can find the very basic stuff with a bit of research :)

                    2. 1

                      I will use F# at a new job

                      Mind sharing company’s name? Curious about places using functional programming languages.

                      1. 1

                        Sure, it’s called valora digital. It’s in the retail space, based in Switzerland. We’ll basically build self-serve stores and a bunch of ecommerce.

                    3. 2

                      My sole issue with F# is that dotnet has no support for the ppc64le architecture yet.

                      There is some progress on this front: [1] [2] [3]

                      1. 1

                        You can develop on Linux, Windows, MacOS and without modification it works.

                        AFAIK, F# programs need the .NET runtime being installed. How do you enforce this on the client side? Or is it possible to bundle the runtime with your program?

                        1. 4

                          Publishing your app as self-contained produces an application that includes the .NET Core runtime and libraries, and your application and its dependencies. Users of the application can run it on a machine that doesn’t have the .NET Core runtime installed.

                          https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/core/deploying/

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                            Thanks. Do you know much MBs this adds to an “hello world” application?

                            1. 4

                              A lot, in my experience. A simple program that uses nothing but the standard library will output a binary of about 90mb.

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                                Do you know if there are any efforts in the pipeline to modularize .NET, like JDK 9 did?

                          2. 0

                            And? How is this related to my comment about development?

                          3. 1

                            How good is F# for writing cross-platform GUI apps?

                            1. 2

                              fairly lousy in my experience. i try it every year or two, because it really does sound like a great language for it, and invariably end up giving up after a few days due to running into issues with linux as my development environment. that said, my last attempt was in 2018 so things might be better now; i would personally like to see a working, reasonably-sized gui app somewhere on github that i could use as a reference before trying again.

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                                Good question, I have no idea.

                                1. 1

                                  It’s okayish. Worst case you can use C# for UI which has better tooling. Check out Avalonia which supports Windows, MacOS, and Linux, with Android and iOS coming soon.

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                                I still feel like I’m stuck in mid 201X regarding my frontend skills. To be honest I just don’t want to invest the amount of time it’ll take to get fluent in a “modern” stack, so some basic vue/react with bootstrap it is. And the moment you’ve started doing something for frontend, it’ll already feel like you’re outdated and behind (svelte)..

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                                  Dude, don’t worry about it, that stack is 100% fine, and not outdated. Getting sucked into FOMO about JS frameworks and tooling is a total trap. If you’re not a full-time frontend engineer, use whatever gets the job done.

                                  Once you feel like learning something new would be a fun way to spend two weekends, go for it.

                                  Tailwind is awesome for example, but there’s not that much to it. It’s just some nice atomic utility classes, but that means you build all the component styling yourself (buttons, cards, …) instead of using the ready-made bootstrap abstraction.

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                                    Wow didn’t fully read your comment and just now noticed we both mentioned tailwind! I’m so addicted to it!

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                                      I agree, it somehow hits exactly the right level of abstraction. For me it nudges me into some possibilities I would never have tried with bootstrap or pure CSS.

                                      For example last year I had some really opinionated vision for a travel planner UI that would have been completely boring and bad with just prefabricated components: https://gllvr.com. I’m sure my implementation is still kind of rubbish for a lot of use cases, but I couldn’t even imagine doing it with bootstrap/bulma, etc.

                                      1. 3

                                        I really like the UI on that travel planner.

                                        I’m sure it has more to do with the way my background has warped my mind than with anything inherent to either approach, but I found it easier to build buttons/cards/etc with these utilities than I did to get the ready-made ones to look/work the way I wanted them to.

                                        I would have found it devilishly hard to get that striped component in your planner (where you click on the left side to type in where you’ll be sleeping or click on the right side to copy the previous night’s location) to be anything like what you made in bootstrap. I do suspect there are people out there who wouldn’t find it so, though.

                                        1. 2

                                          That’s a great UI!

                                          I agree, tailwind makes me more likely to experiment and try new things too.

                                          With bootstrap you’re too often locked in to how a certain component works, and it’s really hard to change the way components behave.

                                          It has given me a second wind with frontend stuff, and I’m actually enjoying making websites again!

                                    2. 3

                                      Vue, React, Angular, Svelte, and most frontend frameworks since React and Angular 2, are modern UI component frameworks. Once you understand components deeply, the learning curve for any of the others is much shorter. Svelte may be well designed and easier for beginners than most, but part of why people report picking it up in an afternoon is that they already understand components.

                                      The details differ between frameworks, especially with the direction React has gone with hooks, but despite the proliferation of frameworks in recent years, there’s been a substantial convergence on components since the days of Backbone, Angular 1, jQuery, Knockout, and all of the other not-quite-component frameworks. They may have been fewer in number back then, but the fundamentals varied widely across tools. The situation today is much more approachable despite the memes.

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                                        I find react to be quite horrible if you want to use or do stuff that doesn’t exist for it as a lib. (Also don’t get me started on the amount of packages and reported CVEs in a hello world..)

                                        1. 1

                                          Really? I generally don’t use any React-specific libraries, and React itself I’m sure has few or no dependencies (I use Preact most of the time, so I’m not sure the state of React). Are you talking about create-react-app? I’ve never used it myself, it seems totally unnecessary.

                                      2. 2

                                        I’ve been using bootstrap for years, and I loved it but some things just didn’t feel quite right.

                                        I’ve recently switched to tailwindcss and it has made me so happy. Doing anything is just better and feels more fun. Also you don’t end up with loads of custom CSS.

                                        If you switch away from bootstrap I can almost guarantee your life will be better :)

                                        This is the post that finally changed my mind:

                                        https://adamwathan.me/css-utility-classes-and-separation-of-concerns/

                                        EDIT: tailwind is really easy to learn if you’re worried about that. Also, the documentation is amazing

                                        1. 1

                                          That post, plus about 20 minutes with this tutorial persuaded me that I was interested in giving tailwind a real try.

                                          I found that having one workspace with two browsers tiled next to each other, one with my site and one with the tailwind docs, and a second with the code open, made it really fast and enjoyable to try things out. The search on the tailwind documentation is especially good, and the live updates that come with svelte running in dev mode are very snappy.

                                          It’s actually pretty high on my list to dig in and see just how those live updates work. There are a couple of spots in my own code where I could use a similar mechanism to very good effect, assuming it’s not leaning on some heavy mechanism that gets shaken out in the production builds.

                                        2. 2

                                          I was stuck with jinja + a little jquery for my front end. So state of the art 2008? It was starting to slow my ability to explore some ideas in a way I wanted to share. I don’t think I’d have been motivated to spend 30 hours exploring this for a couple of weeks if I had a good grasp of vue and bootstrap.

                                          The feedback from changing something on the server in dev mode to seeing it in the client is so much faster than it was when I was writing jinja templates and sending them in response to form submissions. That’s one of the major improvements of moving for me, and I think vue/react/bootstrap would’ve gotten me that also.

                                          This stack just lined up with my mental model a little better, which meant a lot as I was trying to learn a pile of “new” all at once. Tailwind’s utility structure combined with the way styles are scoped by default in svelte made it easier for me to think about my UI layout than it ever has been for web stuff.

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                                          Thanks for the article, lots of useful info. Have you looked at the Digital Ocean managed instance, and how it compares?

                                          1. 1

                                            Across what axes? Price? Features? Ease of administration? Just curious.

                                          1. 2

                                            I’ve been looking for a GA alternative for a while. But here is somethiing that I don’t get, so please help me out: Why not just count at the request layer? All I want to know is some total number of visits, and which page was visited. Maybe knowing total vs unique visitors would be nice too.

                                            I know Netlify has this as an additional service, but where are the easy to install solutions for self-hosted sites? Or is there some downside I am not seeing?

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                                              This was a great read! I’ve been looking at postgraphile but wanted something that was just regular rest. Now I know there is postgrest!

                                              But I have been thinking more and more about how critical knowing databases is for being able to build new things, especially when you don’t have the money or the people to build abstractions around databases. But, like mentioned in the article, it does require time, and that is precious.

                                              1. 5

                                                There are a few tools like PostgREST out there. Supabase, Hasura, XGeneCloud, Prisma. You can also generate a REST API from OpenAPI specs with OpenAPI Generator. I’ve been working on a similar tool that can generate a REST API and admin UI from Postgres or MySQL.

                                                1. 2

                                                  Do any of these tools intercept the query and rewrite it, possibly joining across multiple SQL backends? Of those that do, do they do query push down?

                                                  1. 2

                                                    Stardog’s virtual graphs can do that.

                                                    1. 2

                                                      Not that I’m aware of.

                                                      1. 2

                                                        I think Hasura can stitch GraphQL queries. Or I guess they call it remote joins: https://hasura.io/blog/remote-joins-a-graphql-api-to-join-database-and-other-data-sources/

                                                      2. 1

                                                        FWIW I’m writing out the Part 2 of this blog post where I ship actual code on AWS (hopefully for publishing tomorrow, repo here: https://github.com/yingw787/postgres_as_app), and it’s shockingly easy to get started with PostgREST. It’s tar one binary, copy in a conf file, and go. The robustness of Haskell with the simplicity of Go. All runtime conf options, like pagination, are handled via HTTP headers. It’s definitely a tool I want to incorporate into my future apps, because it’s stupid simple and transparent.

                                                    1. 3

                                                      (It is good to be self-employed, with a good amount of free time to work on open source).

                                                      1. 2

                                                        Just checked out neuron, really cool! I’m hoping to find some time soon to give zettelkasten a serious try.

                                                      1. 3

                                                        Oh man, that fricking Stéphane Picq music is so good. I remember I tried to dig out as much of his stuff as I could find a couple of years back, and being very sad that he hasn’t produced much more since the 90s. The KGB and MegaRace soundtracks are also insanely good.

                                                        1. 2

                                                          Absolutely. The things Picq did with Ad-lib gold are impenetrable to mere mortals like us.

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                                                          Hi, this is really great, thanks for the initiative!

                                                          We have ZuriHac coming up, and I could imagine this being a really nice as a Workshop. Could you imagine running an online session in some form?

                                                          Also, Niklas was recently working on making the async docs a lot clearer (https://nh2.me/async-docs/Control-Concurrent-Async.html), maybe it’s also worth putting the two of you in touch (if you don’t already know each other)

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Hi, thank you very much!

                                                            Could you imagine running an online session in some form?

                                                            Honestly I have no bloody idea. :) Documentation writing is not something that would fit the “Hackathon format” very well, because we need time and coordination with the stakeholders, rework the wording, etc.
                                                            Also I voluntarily limited the scope of this initiative so we could bootstrap newcomers in an efficient way. as the tracking issue states:

                                                            You are encouraged to tackle a module if you think you can add something missing, be it examples, unmentioned edge-cases, or a direct risk of runtime error (through the use of error/errorWithoutStacktrace/throw/undefined, etc)

                                                            And in the context of writing / correcting documentation, I don’t believe the “hack and iterate fast” model adopted by Hackathons is appropriate. This is precisely the type of task where we ponder the meaning of words and how to optimise the words/information ratio (“writing long prose that gets your paper accepted” versus “get to the point, make people use your stuff”).


                                                            maybe it’s also worth putting the two of you in touch (if you don’t already know each other)

                                                            I don’t think we’ve ever spoke with each-other, but it would be nice, yes.

                                                            Given that the ongoing work only targets base, a tracking issue on the GHC Gitlab is plenty enough in terms of features (especially back-linking).

                                                            We will surely need another platform if we are to tackle the large Haskell libraries that live outside of GHC (vector, aeson, async, bytestring, text, etc…).
                                                            And I don’t even want to think about coordinating efforts for the larger ecosystem yet because that seems like a Sisyphean task!

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Oh yeah, that makes sense. For what it’s worth, we had a documentation session two years ago, that was led by Oskar Wickström. It seems to have worked out quite well, but as you say, it wasn’t careful coordination with all the stakeholders, it was more filling some obvious gaps in libraries where it’s lower risk to just send a PR and get incremental changes merged. The newbies also liked it as an excuse to deep-dive into a library, wwhile having a mentor to support them.

                                                              So I think you’re right about docs in base needing a more careful approach. You’re still very welcome however to come hunt for volunteers at ZuriHac!

                                                              And I don’t even want to think about coordinating efforts for the larger ecosystem yet because that seems like a Sisyphean task!

                                                              True, and it makes me happy to see that goods docs are becoming a lot more valued in a lot of communities, and projects with exceptional docs are nowadays geting the appropriate amount of praise.

                                                              1. 2

                                                                You’re still very welcome however to come hunt for volunteers at ZuriHac!

                                                                Thank you very much 🙏 I’ll make myself discreet. ;)

                                                                it makes me happy to see that goods docs are becoming a lot more valued in a lot of communities

                                                                I was directly impacted by how good was the Elixir documentation, and the stark contrast with the state of the Erlang docs, when I started programming. Clearly documentation is less viewed as a luxury and more as a part of what makes a language.

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                                                            I think I’ll take another stab at learning how to program.

                                                            1. 1

                                                              Nice, what are you learning? Is there something specific you would like to build?

                                                              1. 2

                                                                I bought a couple of books about Ruby, mainly because the syntax makes sense to me. I’ll also give Python another look (have tons of ebooks about it). I want to create cross-platform apps, so I can contribute to the FOSS world. I’m not a fan of Electron and the NPM mess, so no Javascript for me. :)

                                                                In the past, when I tried to start learning to program, I saw something about another language and would go “That looks cool, let me check that out.” It’s hard to know what is the best language to learn.

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  Oh yeah, that’s such a classic problem, I’ve fought with this type of indecision for years. Honestly, either Ruby or Python are going to be great for you, and JavaScript would be fine too! But it’s important to just stick with one for now and build whatever is satisfying to you.

                                                                  I wish you luck and joy with it, programming is sometimes frustrating, but in the end very rewarding!

                                                            1. 4

                                                              Making yogurt, going for a bike ride, fixing some knee pain from running by doing some yoga, calling friends.

                                                              1. 3

                                                                What can Yoga do exactly about knee pain ? Do you have some resources to share about it ? I am curious because I have some for the same reason !

                                                                1. 3

                                                                  Not OP, but there are many pains caused by one half of a muscle pair being too short (typically caused by not stretching it out often enough).

                                                                  This results in misalignment, which means some force gets transmitted through stabilisation muscles instead of main muscles, which strains them quickly.

                                                                  Yoga helps those pains by including whole body stretching, lengthening muscles so they can rest in an aligned pose.

                                                                  That said, any exercise can also exacerbate these problems - if you load up an area that’s not able to hold alignment, you will get injured pretty quickly. Large yoga classes are not conducive to avoiding this.

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    Today I learned, thank you :)

                                                                  2. 2

                                                                    That’s the million dollar question, and @danielrheath summarised it very well!

                                                                    Basically I’m trying to be as gentle with my body as possible while still exercising. My experience from climbing taught me that to properly heal something like tendinosis/tendonitis I need to keep the affected bodyparts active while incorporating a stretching routine after exertion. I stopped running for years, and nothing at all healed, it just stayed the same :)

                                                                    Yoga just gives you great end-to-end routines, so I don’t have to piece together something from different exercises. I just did this one for example: https://youtu.be/nzCMptGGZt8.

                                                                    But as Daniel said, I would definitely be aware of the limits of your body. If you try to “compete” with the girls in your class that have flexible bone structures, you’re going to get hurt. I prefer to do it alone for that reason.

                                                                    Last note: all that self study, getting to know your body, and trying out what works for you is really important. BUT, if you have the chance (and money) to see a professional you should definitely also use that option. Especially if your pain persists.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      My experience from climbing taught me that to properly heal something like tendonosis/tendonitis I need to keep the affected bodyparts active while incorporating a stretching routine after exertion.

                                                                      Thanks for the tips: I experienced the same problem when climbing so I will definitely try to strech (gently) more often; starting tomorrow morning !

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Hell yeah, fixing yourself and learning how to practice your sport(s) more sustainably is the best 💪

                                                                        In case you’re mostly bouldering I can also recommend doing more sport climbing for a while!

                                                                1. 1

                                                                  I use Zola, and I’m pretty happy with it. I wrote my own theme, but since you prefer not to do that, I think Hugo might be a better choice.

                                                                  The latter has a famously annoying templating syntax, but I think its many other qualities make up for it.

                                                                  Here’s my repo if you want to peek at some Zola source code: https://github.com/2mol/juricho.me

                                                                  1. 1

                                                                    I just used Zola for the first time and liked it (I built this site with it).

                                                                    I have read that Hugo has an annoying template syntax (from the Zola people), but I’ve never actually used Hugo.

                                                                    Can someone tell me why Hugo’s template syntax is considered annoying?

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      The latter has a famously annoying templating syntax, but I think its many other qualities make up for it.

                                                                      That probably depends on one’s personal taste. I like the Hugo templating syntax, because it’s the default Go template syntax, which I use for other things too.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        That’s a good datapoint, thanks. In this case it might be worth putting more effort into learning it then.

                                                                    1. 2

                                                                      Cool! Let’s see when the github integration is ready.

                                                                      I’m still looking for the perfect note taking solution. I want full text search, start writing a new note immediately in markdown, have it available on the Web, iOS, maybe Android and Mac/Linux (if the Web app is great I don’t require a native app).

                                                                      So far I have a folder full of markdown notes in a git repo and push it up to GitHub for full text search and read / edit the notes on my iPhone through Working Copy (git client with an editor built in) but then I sometimes forget to push the changes and end up having a conflict in git.

                                                                      Only Evernote and notion.so come up all the time, but I don’t feel comfortable with them having my data in a way I can’t easily extract.

                                                                      1. 1

                                                                        I do something similar with nvalt. My workflow is amazingly simple, search is good, and everything is in a flat folder, so no micromanagement with tags or subfolders or whatever. I don’t put them in git, I just keep my folder in Dropbox. That way I don’t need to push, but I could imaging a setup where it does a commit & push every day or so.

                                                                        Things to be improved:

                                                                        • I don’t have anything satisfactory on my phone yet.
                                                                        • I don’t have any nice remote access, in case I’m on my work computer.
                                                                        • It doesn’t do markdown that nicely, so I sometimes jump out to a better editor.

                                                                        So basically, I’ve always been looking for the “perfect” solution as well, but I realized that something simple that I actually use gets me 85% of the way there. My proof is that I’ve been using this system for years, and I have tons of old garbage notes that I never need to delete, and I always find what I’m looking for.

                                                                        1. 1

                                                                          I’m actually on the beta for the upcoming nvUltra, Dropbox might be a good cross-platform solution instead of git, I’ll try that, thank you!

                                                                          At least on iOS there’s 1Writer and iA Writer which I quite like and I think they can also sync with Dropbox. But as you said, it (nvalt/nvultra) doesn’t do markdown that nicely and I also don’t like the UI that much at the moment.

                                                                          1. 1

                                                                            Aw shucks, I was hoping for nvultra to fix all that :)

                                                                            1Writer and iA Writer are awesome. I remember getting stuck with automatic sync though, could it be that you can only do that in Dropbox if you have a premium account?

                                                                            1. 1

                                                                              I don’t think so, I’m not subscribed to Dropbox at the moment, this would be bad. I might try it over the weekend

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                                                                        Still recovering from a bit of late 2019 burn out. Back to full capacity at work but still taking it easy on side projects. Starting to feel up to thinking about that stuff again though.

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                                                                          How do you structure your off-time? I’ve always wondered if burned-out folks should just relax and mooch around, be social, or be physically active, doing sports and nature stuff. How did you choose to cope?

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                                                                            Interesting that you’d choose that word.

                                                                            Structure is exactly what I DON’T do with my free time in this circumstance.

                                                                            I purposefully do what I absolutely HAVE to do outside of work and nothing more. I leave the remainder of my time unscheduled, focusing on the various kinds of self care (exercise, sleep, social time and varying forms of entertainment - reading, watching videos, playing games) as well as mindfulness things like meditation.

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                                                                              Ah, that’s what wanted to say, but I expressed it poorly :) I meant what did you choose to do in the off-time. Sounds like you had it figured out pretty well!

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                                                                            Same here. Late 2019 was rough. It’s a new year. Time for a fresh start making progress on some things, totally kicking ass, or something in between.

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                                                                            Flying to London today so I can get my visa to Russia, and also my international driving permit for my moped trip in Thailand.

                                                                            Oh, also working at the Google for Startups Campus in Shoreditch for the next week or so.

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                                                                              I’m prepping to do a sabbatical, most of which I’ll spend in London. I know you also write Elm, could I hit you up to ask you about what interesting stuff is going on in the city, which meetups are good, etc?

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                                                                                To be honest, I don’t really know. I think the Haskell meetups are quite good, but otherwise although my businesses are based in London and legally I too am based here, I probably only spend a couple of weeks in London per year.

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                                                                              Wow, I find the presentation aspect of your article awesome, huge kudos for that! :) I mean by that also the pacing and terseness, and the way you’re doing it step by step… not sure how to put it in words, but it feels so fresh and comfortable to me. Do you have some tips/tricks/techniques you could share how to make blog articles so nice to read? Ahahah, and I especially love the final “bloopers” a.k.a. “generative art” section :D

                                                                              If I could only ask for one small extra favour in the pure presentation area — in the footnotes, could you make it possible to get back to the point from where they’re linked? i.e. “reverse links” — make the footnote number clickable, carrying me to where it is referenced? I was curious what’s the story of the image in footnote 3, and I ended up looking for it by hand in the page, as the footnote numbers didn’t seem clickable (? at least to me…?)

                                                                              Ah, and one more thing: from my experience, the “hooks” (or whatever’s the name) on the pieces tend to also have some variation in the puzzles I’ve seen. Can be some idea for future article… or the dreaded “excercise for the reader”… Uh, sorry — I didn’t really have time to read the article thoroughly yet, so I didn’t notice you’ve already mentioned this as a possible follow-up. This makes it even more awesome — not trying to do everything at once, but still listing possible future ideas. Thanks! :)

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                                                                                Do you have some tips/tricks/techniques you could share how to make blog articles so nice to read?

                                                                                I’m really happy that you like the way it’s structured! I don’t know if I have tips yet, I’m also just getting started with that. But I usually have the following in mind:

                                                                                • write like you’re explaining it to a person in front of you.
                                                                                • break up dense text with pictures and bullet-point lists whenever possible.
                                                                                • Use short sentences, have a bias towards deleting stuff.

                                                                                in the footnotes, could you make it possible to get back to the point from where they’re linked?

                                                                                Absolutely! I lost this feature when I switched the static site generator from Hugo to Zola, so I also miss it. I haven’t figured out how to generate them automatically yet, I think it needs a change in Zola, or at least the markdown engine that it’s using. Maybe time to learn basic Rust.

                                                                                Thank you very much for the feedback!

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                                                                                IIRC the reason you can’t officially write native code in Elm anymore(!) is that it might give a bad user experience if they crash, giving Elm a bad name. Is this still the official reason, or is there any hope of improvement?

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                                                                                  The official reason is because it interferes with dead-code elimination. Without native code they can eliminate all unused functions in all modules.

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                                                                                    That, and if there is ever the decision to retarget to webassembly instead of javascript, you kinda get all the libraries working for free.

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                                                                                      That seems a lame excuse on Elm’s part. Webassembly can call out to JS just fine. Takes a bit of work to generate bindings, but, that’s what compilers are for.

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                                                                                  A travel planner to help me keep an overview when I plan trips. I tend to get lost in my own mess when booking places, flights, keeping track of things to do etc.

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                                                                                    This looks really neat! On Chrome Desktop it appears as though I can’t click “New Plan” – nothing happens. No errors in the console, either.

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                                                                                      Wait another week so that I can get around to implementing that :)

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                                                                                        I took another look. Something about the reading from localStorage (?) is a little wonky but this is neat. Is there a way to specify timestamps in events? Or concurrent/overlapping events? Any OSS plans?

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                                                                                          Hi, so cool that you came back to check out the progress :)

                                                                                          • I actually use precise timestamps to save events, but I’m still debating whether to expose them to the user. I want to keep this high-level sketching interaction before going into more micro-managing your trip. But I can imagine exposing it as an optional feature.
                                                                                          • no overlapping events, since they are only meant to describe the physical place where you are. In the future I want to add activities as lists of things on the right, where the notes are right now.
                                                                                          • I haven’t decided on open-sourcing, but I’m open to the idea. I am deferring this decision to a bit later, after I have a somewhat finished tool that people can seriously use.

                                                                                          If you want to hack on the source code, I’m happy to send it to you. I’ll email you.

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                                                                                            Oh no! I just went back to this comment to find the link and I get “Not Found”. Is the project dead?

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                                                                                              On the contrary my friend! I finally gave it a proper name and moved it to https://gllvr.com

                                                                                              I’m still slowly chipping away at smaller features & polish. At some point I will probably do a proper sprint to implement some of the bigger requested features like maps or similar. You can send me an email to hi@gllvr.com if you want to stay in touch!

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                                                                                                Oh wonderful! I will make sure to check it out.

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                                                                                              Ah! I was more hoping for something like:

                                                                                              • 18:00 Arrive at airport
                                                                                              • 20:00 Depart airport

                                                                                              Something like that. And all the while I can see some state transitions like “transition from being in San Francisco Bay Area to Switzerland” and the two states can be overlapped with smaller sub-activities. It’s a bit late here so this phrasing is likely garbled.

                                                                                              Oh, okay! Neat, I’ll take a look in my inbox.

                                                                                              EDIT: I suppose I am after something that I cannot do (easily) with either a calendaring application or a spreadsheet application. I’ll need to ruminate more.

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                                                                                            Aha! Gotcha. Excellent.

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                                                                                        I set up a personal website for the first time since 2001. My old one is still on archive.org. It’s very very lame, and I absolutely love it. I’m thinking of digging it out and including it in the new site as an easter egg.

                                                                                        If I have time left, I want to continue implementing decision trees in Haskell, and maybe write about it. In terms of scope it’s an awesome problem: small enough to understand, complicated enough so that the implementation is not trivial, and useful enough to extract some insights from actual data!