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    I recently implemented a modular system for zsh! Glad to see it’s a known pattern

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      I’m interested in what I’m calling a non-linear shell. I will be using a python wrapper around bash/zsh that puts the prompt line in a fixed location at the bottom of the screen. Output buffers of each command will be organized under the command that generated the output. Ideally, there would be keybindings for navigating output and folding/hiding output buffers. A stretch goal would be a live preview of the bash/zsh syntax as I’m writing a new command, explainshell.com is pretty much the ideal output for what I’m thinking, or the bpython repl. I’m also curious to see if the oilshell bash ast parser would be useful for previewing bash commands as I’m writing them. Another goal would be to have an embedded neovim buffer as the prompt. This weekend I intend to get the project repo set up, with the basic framework for managing the terminal window, prompt line, and managing command output with an interactive zsh shell. Any suggestions, reference projects, prior art, or feature ideas welcome.

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        I’m going to be doing a lot of garden tasks. Continuing my multi year battle with an overgrown lawn, I’ll be hoeing and planting a mix of white clover and other soil building non-grass lawn plants. I also need to make a moveable round pen for my goslings so they can start mowing other parts of my existing grass lawn. Then I have some non walkable weedy areas that need hoeing. I found a bunch of burpee seeds from 2014 that are probably barely viable, but I may as well use them up and see if anything sprouts. Software projects in another post.

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          I wish I’d taken more advantage of the garden we had growing up. I always regarded working in it as a chore imposed by my mom rather than appreciating it for the meditative relaxing activity it was.

          Funny how these things work. Back then all I had was time and I craved ANYTHING like mental stimulation. Now I don’t have 2 seconds to rub together and would kill to have an afternoon weeding a garden :)

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          g] is wonderful, I’ve wanted to know how to do this and assumed it would be an ex command, so I hadn’t looked it up yet.

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            It’s worth noting that the pocket chip is in a limited and final production run. The new company behind it got a hold of some of the few remaining processors. When they run out of this batch, the machine will again be unavailable.

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              • Logging framework (it’ll be better this time, I’ll show you)
              • ETL tools (there’s a lot of options, but none that are great, so I’ll make one more that’s worse than all current ones)
              • Type system for Python (because…obviously)
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                I find myself wanting to refactor airflow into a minimal version for orchestrating docker container jobs

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                I got an ErgoDox-ez last year, and I couldn’t be happier. I was really worried, not having a trackpoint mouse, that I would have to go back and forth to a trackpad. I did far too much research into installing a trackpoint. But then I set up mousekeys… and I’m absolutely delighted. (layout)

                I still need to figure out a better location for the {[ / ]} keys, neither above my right thumb, nor along the bottom work quite right for me. I’m debating using the upper modifier key to the right of T and left of Y.

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                  I’ve been looking forward to trying to use oilshell as my daily driver for many months now. If you’re giving it a shot, I’ll do the same later this week.

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                    Great! Here’s some more info about testing:

                    https://github.com/oilshell/oil/issues/161

                    One script I stumbled across but didn’t get a chance to test is nix-env.sh. I was trying to build a C++ project that used Nix.

                    If anyone happens to be a Nix user, or if you’re a user of some unique distro like Void Linux, there are bound to be many weird and wonderful shell scripts found there :)

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                    Is RMS, not known to be a very empathic or polite person, the right one to identify the conversations that push away women and write the policies to make sure they are included?

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                      You don’t need to beg the question or argue from ignorance: RMS has put his work in front of you and asked for comments and suggestions. If you can spot something you think works against the stated goal or know a way to improve these guidelines that seems to be one of the explicit aims in publishing them. Regardless of whether feedback (yours or others) is received and incorporated, time will tell whether this document does what it purports to do.

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                        Yes, actually. I think he is. I think that because I read the linked content, rather than making pointless comments besmirching his capabilities.

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                        As I understand, this is the web part only. Is there a FOSS cycling/running tracker on mobile thatthatyou can recommend?

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                          The website should work fine on mobile when it’s done. I wanted to use a web app for everything but unfortunately it’s not possible to keep the device awake to record GPS from a web app so I will be learning Android development and building a full app for it.

                          Currently I use OSMAnd for recording and then upload the file using my desktop. I’m not aware of anything better thats foss currently.

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                            Owntracks is quite good https://github.com/owntracks

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                            I have a Truly Ergonomic mechanical that I don’t end up using because I prefer pointing stick mice.

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                              I assume the name is a reference to the construct/character in Zelazny’s Amber series: http://princeofamber.wikia.com/wiki/Ghostwheel

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                                The first line of the repo is a quote from Trumps of Doom, so yes, it’s a zelazny reference :p

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                                Spicy take: I always got the feeling OLPC was a FSF-adjacent scheme to embezzle UN money and put it into eye-in-the-sky perennial Linux desktop dreams. The machines felt overdesigned and Sugar dog slow on them. Things like Open Firmware on x86 or the mesh networking were masturbatory and served little purpose. Promises like the pen-on-trackpad or Sugar’s ease of live application modification were never met. There never was any sort of curriculum; HW was shipped with no plan.

                                I will admit that the screen on them is excellent though. Pixel Qi should have taken off.

                                What they should have done, IME, is acquire whatever cheap used high-end business laptop hardware was at the time, (fairly reliable, faster than the anemic Geode in XO-1, and cheap too) and design a curriculum with it so teachers have something to do with the machines, rather than be thrown overboard into it.

                                edit: Something else I did find interesting: The Mac OS X offer. That seems clearly to me, to be Jobs wanting to create iPad, using OLPC as its vehicle.

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                                  I have one of these sitting on a shelf in my closet, given to me several years ago by a friend who bought it during the “Give One Get One” program. I remember following this project but was a broke student at the time so I was interested in trying it out and seeing what they got right and where it went wrong.

                                  As you detailed, there’s a lot of interesting ideas in this unit (with questionable motives for their inclusion in the design). There was too much groupthink around doing something new and cool, and using specific technologies that weren’t ready for prime time. This led the project away from it’s goal of actually shipping something successful to kids (at least out of the box). I remember when I first read that they were developing Sugar in Python and wondering why anybody would do that. Python at the time was super slow compared with how it is now and there were much better choices for developing a full desktop environment. In addition, the RedHat distro it was based on had too much bloat. These were not fast machines and every clock cycle counts.

                                  When I was a kid in the 80’s, I could turn on my Commodore 64 and get a Ready prompt right away, and start typing Basic programs. Commercial games and programs loading from cartridge were fairly instant as well. I feel like the rugged industrial design of OLPC was the right direction and they totally missed the boat on software. The night I got the OLPC from my friend, I checked out, built, and flashed the latest version of the OLPC image. I cannot overstate how disappointed I was with how long Sugar took to boot up.

                                  Honestly, I’m not even sure computers would’ve kept my interest as a kid had my Commodore taken that long to boot to be usable. Even programs loading from 5¼” floppy disk or cassette tape were faster. Sugar had a lot of neat functions, but the delay to get to a very slow desktop and then to switch to each task rendered the device useless as shipped. This was a project I wanted to believe in, but it really went off the rails.

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                                    I always got the feeling OLPC was a FSF-adjacent scheme The FSF HATED OLPC once the microsoft deal was announced.

                                    Open Firmware on x86 This was mainly because they had weird custom hardware, and were trying to be free/open.

                                    mesh networking Looked like it was going to work at first, but they were plagued by problems with the wifi daughter board not having a good or consistent interface. This was well well before there were devices like the ESP8266 or common WIFI-on-a-chip boards. I believe they ended up using the same wifi board as the first xbox wifi adapter.

                                    Sugar’s ease of live application modification were never met That was met by early 2009, implemented by Chris Ball I believe. View-source was a regularly used and well distributed feature. Perhaps you were only using the earlier G1G1 Sugar releases?

                                    acquire whatever cheap used high-end business laptop hardware was at the time Have you tried to reflash and rehabilitate a laptop? It takes a while. It takes much much longer if you don’t have exactly the same hardware. Unpacking and installing on arbitrary machines would have taken a lot longer than you think, and wouldn’t have worked in many of the enviroments the machines were shipped to.

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                                    I am delighted for you! I really enjoy following your projects. You’ve been communicating about your upcoming work and goals really well, and then delivering on those promises. It’s been making me feel like setting up a blog and writing about it to structure my projects. Go have fun this summer! I’ll be excitedly waiting your posts!

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                                      Thanks a lot! Yes you should definitely write about your projects :-) It takes some pushing to get started, but after a dozen or more posts the ball starts rolling downhill. At least, that was my experience. I sometimes feel I spend too much time writing vs. coding, but the effort is almost always rewarded (i.e. people reading what I wrote).

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                                      Call me a skeptic, but I expected this when they shut down development on Light Table.

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                                        The OLPC produced laptop (the XO) had a forth bootloader that had a mini-clone of emacs in it as well. I’m constantly impressed with what those folks accomplished with that hardware.

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                                          On a related note: Apparently the last stage of FreeBSD’s boot loader is scriptable in Forth.

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                                            The OLPC produced laptop (the XO) had a forth bootloader that had a mini-clone of emacs in it as well. I’m constantly impressed with what those folks accomplished with that hardware.

                                            lt’s regular old Open Firmware. It’s also incredibly annoying coming from someone who has an XO-1 - it’s a major piece of NIH when they could have used a normal BIOS (for the time) or UEFI, (the hot newness) as trying to boot anything beyond Sugar is very painful.

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                                              It’s not regular old Open Firmware (unless OF got patches during the XO-1 development, quite possible!)

                                              And it’s not NiH when you invented the hardware. That forth has native access to the onboard webcam, the wifi, it has read/write access to the NAND… It’s a dream machine for a hobbyist child.

                                              I inherited my aunt’s C64, and look at me now! My son is getting that forth-in-a-box. Unfortunately, my C64 came with a book[0] and the XO-1 does not… :(

                                              0: http://www.commodore.ca/commodore-manuals/commodore-64-programmers-reference-guide/

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                                                I edited the manual that shipped on the XO. Unfortunately not in time for the original G1G1 launch, but was available in subsequent OS updates.

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                                            I also realized there is nothing in the PyPI package description that actually indicates what version of Python is being targeted

                                            These might be poorly exposed, but there is a long list of classifers for projects which contain the python versions.

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                                              I’m running Debian Testing (stretch ATM) with Gnome-shell 3.20.2. I’m not ecstatic about it, but it serves my purposes and mostly stays out of my way.

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                                                :(){ :|:& };: <– will fill up the process counter on any unix machine and make it non responsive. From inside docker it will freeze the host system too docker run busybox “:(){ :|:& };:”

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                                                  Forkbombs are trivially mitigated by user process limits. And in any case, the severity of the problem is not the issue (it’s at worst a partial DoS from local code execution, a position from which you can do much more interesting, dangerous things); it’s the reflection of the attitude of the SystemD developers that “eh, I’m sure I know what I’m doing” despite all evidence to the contrary that’s concerning.

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                                                  All of the images in the medium post are blurs of light gray with faded splotches of color. Oh nevermind, after refreshing 3 times it turns out they are slides and don’t give any additional information or screenshots.