Threads for iwre0

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    But you need internet to read this article to know what to do with OpenBsd

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      How does a tiling wm work for me? It’s my understanding that I have to set it up “my way”, according to each task in my daily flow. Whatif I don’t have a flow?

      My usual gnome flow on my desktop is just meta key to find an app and launch it, alt tabbing my way to an open one, and meta+arrow to move my current app to this or that corner. When I hook my windows laptop from work, I might also need to move my thing to another window, ctrl-meta-arrow does it. I usually open terminator where I split it up with term panes with ctrl-e or ctrl-o and then with arrows, as by default I just split it in two panes. I open IntelliJ, and there I sometimes want to fiddle with its panes with a mouse, same with Firefox or Chrome dev tools. Occasionally mail app is open, and a comms like slack or teams.

      Sometimes I need to adjust the width of the window manually, with the mouse, because I’m really interested in those logs, or that image. Or open an unusual app like calc or excel or whatnot.

      Luckily, gnome and apps remember where they’ve been last, usually.

      What would a tiling wm bring me? How would my flow look like? Do I have to setup config for each window?

      What benefits would I see? Would it bring me discipline? How much work to set up initially and how much work later on? What happens when I open a new app?

      I can’t find this information online. Anybody has a video or article or presentation at hand to share?

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        How does a tiling wm work for me? It’s my understanding that I have to set it up “my way”, according to each task in my daily flow. Whatif I don’t have a flow?

        If you don’t have a particular flow, you can use whatever is the tiling window manager does by default. Usually new programs will open full screen. If there is already a window open, it will split the screen either vertically or horizontally. And so on. Some tiling WMs let you configure how this splitting happens.

        What would a tiling wm bring me? How would my flow look like? Do I have to setup config for each window?

        A tiling WM would probably help you spend less time moving windows around. In your case, if you need to look at lots of terminals, or have an IDE + terminal + browser open all at once, you can do that in a way that uses all the screen estate without having to manually drag and resize windows.

        I don’t know what your flow would look like. Personally I usually have an Emacs window and a terminal or browser open side by side on one workspace. This lets me look at my code and documentation at once easily. On another I will have my chat apps, usually Slack and FB Messenger open side by side, maybe Hangouts too. That way I can see all new messages at a glance. I find this is more useful when plugged into a larger monitor where I have more screen real estate than on my laptop.

        You don’t have to set up a config at the beginning. You can use it purely interactively and if you find yourself using certain layouts all the time, your WM probably gives you a way of setting up layouts and restoring them or binding them to keybindings.

        What benefits would I see? Would it bring me discipline? How much work to set up initially and how much work later on? What happens when I open a new app?

        You will spend less time manually moving windows around and once you find layouts you like, you can save and restore them. I don’t know if it would bring you discipline (I don’t know what you mean by that). You should be able to get set up running without doing any configuration.

        A few days ago there was a post here about Regolith which is an Ubuntu spin with a beginner friendly tiling setup that you can use to see if you like tiling. If you use macOS I recommend Moom.

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          Thanks. I might try it sometime, but I’m not convinced. I don’t hear a “killer app” for me.

          It may be “the dishwasher effect”. Before I had one (grew up without, then went on living without), I never thought it’s a big deal. Once I’ve bought one, I never think I’d go back.

          But from my safe “defaults only on everything” perspective, I don’t see the incentive.

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            That’s totally fine. If you are fine using the defaults on whatever system you have and that works for you, then you don’t need to be bothered. Tiling window managers (more specifically, the automated window management they allow) is attractive to me, but it doesn’t have to be for you.

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          I’ve seen a couple of comments talking about configuration paralysis, but I haven’t really experienced that. I just have everything full-screen all the time; I only switch to a “proper” tiling arrangement occasionally, e.g. if I’ve opened the GIMP; then switch back. Note that this isn’t per-app or configuration-dependent, it just rearranges whatever windows happen to be open on the current desktop.

          In general, I quickly stopped caring about the size and shape of windows. The only per-app configuration I have is which virtual desktop my auto-start programs appear on, which is the same as I had on floating WMs.

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            》What would a tiling wm bring me? How would my flow look like

            Nothing. You would need arrange every window at your desired size and move them cross the workareas spending lot of time learning new keystrokes. This every time you need two new different applications working at the same sight.

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              Not certain if this is a disgruntled or a troll reply :)

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                sorry, not intended trolling. Its my opinion based in three years using i3. Sure I’m wrong.

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            I was in doubt with which language take once more for my projects and go in deep. python, lua, go.. And then your post reminded me that I made good stuff five years ago with R. As you pointed is so easy read and plot data with R. I think R is my winner now and so I`m going to study again in deep Thank you

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              Short and clean article explaining the privacy problem.

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                does it worth to use this distro over ubuntu+ vanilla i3wvm? different configuration files can be annoying? what’s the “plus”? I ask without knowing and testing the use of regolith-linux.

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                  I’m not sure why it needs to be a new distribution either. The original configuration file was located in ~/.config/i3-regolith/config and a recent dist-upgrade broke the configuration file location and created new dist-specific files in i3-regolith, which broke i3.

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                  no virtualbox is a handicap

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                    I use qemu on OpenBSD to run Linux, Windows (admittedly it’s Windows XP :~/), sortix and other virtual machines - I don’t know how it compares to virtualbox but it works well.

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                      In my experience (as an OS programmer), VirtualBox is very buggy and unreliable. QEMU/KVM is much better, indeed. (OpenBSD’s native hypervisor will likely eventually be ready for prime time here, if it isn’t already.)

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                        vmm(4) is already great at running OpenBSD virtual images - but I’ve not tested it with other OS yet - it’s on my todo list

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                          Depends a little if you for example use Vagrant and then VirtualBox might be a lot more handy. In my last job I gave up being the only person with lxc images because everyone else was on mac+virtualbox, so I had to relent.

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                            I have the exact opposite experience. I have been using VBox for many years on Linux and MacOS and it is very reliable.

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                              If your guests are Linux or Windows, it’s well-polished and stable. If your guests are anything else (especially if you’re doing active OS dev on the guest!), I imagine you’ll find holes in short order.

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                              Except OpenBSD doesn’t have KVM, but its own VMM. You’re stuck with TCG for QEMU.

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                            As others have suggested, vmd is your friend here.

                            While not perfect in terms of speed, I managed to completely get rid of linux @work as a main system.

                            Now I just fire up an ubuntu instance (to be able to install it you need to make the image boot in console mode, nothing too hard) with x2go-server installed. Using x2go-client, I fire up emacs and I’m set.

                            Other (+) points (for me at least):

                            • the ability to just test on the fly an older release. Just a vmctl start <vm-name> away!
                            • as some days I work remotely, there’s no need to ‘pollute’ my base installation with stuff I do not need (php, a web server, the whole npm ecosystem, etc)

                            Of course all the above are dependent to one’s needs. :)

                            Using the aforementioned work flow, I truly do not care if the vm breaks; and if it does, I just copy my backup image and I’m set. :)

                            [edited for grammar]

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                            It took a while still for the importance of free software to set in. But this realization is inevitable, for a programmer immersed in Linux

                            This!

                            I used Windows since 3.11, then after some 20 years I moved to Linux (when MS was like Oracle/Google today). I used Linux as a main system for couple of years, then I returned to Windows again as my main system today.

                            The Linux experience profoundly shaped me, and not because of the things I couldn’t do on Windows - its strictly because of way more open and sharing community and GNU philosophy.

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                              You didn’t say why you moved back to Windows despite all the good you saw in Linux ecosystem. Im curious.

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                                I find Windows much better for every day use. Its clear that usability was not a thing for Linux folks and I can understand that, given the priorities and agendas on that side (I consider Linux non-general-user system, mostly engineering system; exclude Android).

                                I was initially using Ubuntu and later switched to Arch with i3 and although I liked everything a lot from professional and engineering viewpoint, many little things that I didn’t want to think about pushed me back to Windows. Like, why do I have to mount USB flash (yeah, I know about auto-mount and friends but the point is that I don’t want to think about such things, I wanted to work OTB) or recompile a kernel to use gpu drivers.

                                All Linux desktops I tried sucked or looked like Windows 95 in design and usability (and even security). All in all, it required a lot of patience and knowledge and learning just to put the basics on and while it was invaluable experience first time I did it, later it became frustrating as I didn’t get any new knowledge but just a lot of setup and maintenance.

                                There were also many many things that Windows just did better:

                                • Automation in Linux Desktop is next to non existent. On Windows, I can choose many different tools (I prefer Autohotkey) that don’t exist there. Naturally, there is a lower need for those tools on Linux but lower is not the same as non existent like most people pretend.
                                • Bash and friends are ugly and I would personally never like to see them again. Powershell is simply light years ahead of it.
                                • Windows has much better file managers. I use Total Commander and there is simply nothing like that on Linux. I got in love with ranger but later dropped it as it can’t work on Windows.
                                • Windows has instant search via Everything, locate and friends simply can’t compare.
                                • I am a gamer and back then gaming was the best on Windows (maybe not true any more).

                                Today, 5 or so years after, I am more happy about that decision then before as MS is doing all the right moves today. Open sourcing and cross platforming basically everything and including Linux kernel side 2 side will make my eventual return to Linux (or any other) system a non issue. I still use Linux systems a lot, both at home and at job and I believe just by the fact that Windows is not free its unusable for any system that needs to be scalable or contains large group of agents (IoT).

                                The most important thing for me is that when I returned to use Windows, I got to use it radically different then before. I almost always use cross-platform tools now, almost always FOSS and I am in the shell 99% of the time. My Windows setup is automated 99%, I use package manager to install software 100% of the time (if there is no package, I create it rather then installing from the vendor site). 15 years before I used cracked software EXCLUSIVELY. Today I don’t use any, because of CBB and because I know so many little tools that do one job good that I can combine them any way I want. Plus I want to support the community, as we would all benefit from Windows culture to be more alike to one of Linux. My Windows distribution is coded and I can replicate it anywhere starting from default ISO install, by executing script and going for a coffee.

                                Professionally, I think Linux made me great Windows engineer as I use Windows in Linux way. Strange thing to say, but that is what I believe :).

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                                  Out of curiosity, do you have something like a tiling window manager on Windows? I may need to work at a Windows workstation and the hotkey to start and the fast automatic tiling leave me in fear of being very slow. That and apparently vim on Windows being a so-so experience.

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                                    No, window managers aren’t really a thing on Windows.

                                    There are number of tools that try to do this, more or less successful, but IMO none is akin to i3 and friends. Since YMMV you may try some. Last time I was looking into this was few years ago tho.

                                    I have a cross platform vim settings with 50+ plugins and I can’t say I see any difference on vim behavior on Windows vs Linux.

                                    In console world ConEmu gives you great tiling for console windows, Similar to how it works in vim or tmux. It also lets you tile in GUI apps but in explicit (scriptable) manner.

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                                    Woau thank you for your explanations

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                                      I don’t care about achievements, points, for all I care you can all think I am retarded.

                                      But here, I honestly wonder what kind of asshole you need to be to downvote honest personal experience? Shame on those guys.

                                      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yy4CN9DVPII

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                                  the main problem is html. The company I work uses Microsoft accounts. When everyone is sending email with that Outlook, of course in html format, even showing your profile picture .. if you respond a email chain, html looses the format, and all gets ugly for everyone.

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                                        If there’s any overlap between bashblog users and Oil users, I’m very curious if OSH can run this :) It sounds like a great test case.

                                        http://www.oilshell.org/release/0.6.pre16/

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                                          Thanks for sharing! It’s always nice to see bb users close to home :)

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                                          lot of “donating” buttons and poor performance and usability. First proove your engine then ask for support

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                                            and the payments file after run the script… how is it updated?

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                                              After the script runs, you empty the payments file, move the output on top of the old members file, and (if I was doing it now, and not 20 years ago), git commit the result.

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                                                I think it’s a ledger that is being updated manually.

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                                                thunderbird

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                                                  and Spark on iOS

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                                                  I wrote void for similar reasons, and it has totally changed the way I learn things, approach problems, and track progress. I really recommend people learn how to build their own organizers. Everyone hates the organizers that someone else wrote to some extent, but if its your own baby it’s hard to hate :P Use tools you love.

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                                                    I totally agree. I love plain text files. And I only trust and like my own dogfood.

                                                    http://www.sistemasoperativos.org/2012/12/17/mi-todo_list-y-sobre-todo-mi-done_list.html (spanish)

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                                                    I don’t think this is the right solution

                                                    . . for  set zig=$order(^ZIG(zig)) do  quit:'zig
                                                    . . . do takeOff(zig)
                                                    . . . do move(zig)
                                                    

                                                    neither is

                                                    for  set zig=$order(^ZIG(zig)) do
                                                    . do takeOff(zig)
                                                    . do move(zig)
                                                    . quit:'zig
                                                    

                                                    If you don’t want to run takeOff or move with zig=”” and get an infinite loop you must write this code:

                                                    for  set zig=$order(^ZIG(zig)) q:zig="" do
                                                    . do takeOff(zig)
                                                    . do move(zig)
                                                    

                                                    I prefer this way to write in MUMPS, simple and writeless

                                                    F  S zig=$O(^ZIG(zig)) Q:zig=""  D
                                                    . D takeOff(zig)
                                                    . D move(zig)