Threads for izzystardust

  1. 1

    Just the other week I had found myself looking for a digital alarm clock that would automatically re-arm itself on weekdays, and found myself beyond disappointed with the options on the market. I’d been considering making my own, and seeing how simple it was to put this solution together, this might be the push I need to get started.

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        Are the files for the, like, circuit diagram and 3D printed box available? I don’t see them in the repo :)

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          The circuit diagram isn’t there because it’s pretty trivial, you just connect the screen to I2C. I can send you the OnShape link for the box, if you like! (Or include it in the repo).

    1. 1

      I don’t really agree with a person’s “preferred name” is their name, their “legal name” is something else.

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        I tend to assume the best decisions are made close to where the most information is available, and vice versa.

        Why would a state bureaucracy, none of whose members have necessarily met the person in question, have a better idea than the human living with it?

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          I disagree with your disagreement. I’ll take the example of my mother. She dislikes her legal name, and in 99% of circumstances drops her first name entirely and goes by her second name. Everybody knows her by her second name and she only uses her birth name where she legally needs to. She could change it so that her legal name and actual name lined up, but she has sentimental reasons for not doing so owing to who she was named after.

          Her “preferred name” is her name as far as everybody is concerned, and her “legal name” is something else.

          You also have the case of actors, who, for various reasons, need to avoid sharing stage names. Through use, their stage name often ends up becoming simply their name, as that’s what everybody addresses them as outside of a legal context.

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            I feel like both of our viewpoints are valid to some extent — I could argue that her name is still her name, she just goes by another name, and most people are simply unaware of her real name?

            And yes, the case with the actors is quite a common one, such that here in Germany you can register your artist name (Künstlername) easily and it will be put on both the ID card and passport, so that you can use it and identify yourself with it just like you can with your normal name.

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              What makes the name a few bureaucratic entities have in their system her “real name”, one that she herself quite possibly rarely sees, over the name(s) that she and everyone in her day-to-day life refer to her as? Is it because it’s on her birth certificate? Is it because it’s the name some of these entities use? What if any of those were different from one another? What if she had two or more legal names in different countries?

              In my country, your legal name is whatever you say it is, and you can change that whenever you want (provided you’re not trying to commit fraud or something). You may have some minor difficulty with certain institutions (passport office, banks, etc.) who want proof of this, but they generally just want to see that you’ve used the name elsewhere already (power bill, etc.) and your declaration that it is, in fact, your name. When would you define a name as a person’s “real name” in this situation? As soon as they start using it? Once the commonly-interacted-with entities have been notified of it? The majority of them? All of them?

              For example, someone I worked with at one point used to have a double-barrel surname. They got fed up of systems mangling it in various ways, so they dropped the hyphen, taking the first part as a middle name and the second part as a new surname. There’s probably various systems they don’t interact with anymore that still have the old name in their systems, but it’s been changed in most places they deal with regularly. What’s their “real name” to you?

              As the main article, the linked-to Falsehoods list, and other commenters have said, people have different names in different contexts, and you can’t just assume you can take a name from one context and use it in another. Really, you should ask for a name for whatever you’re using it for, and state as much. Most systems (or websites, at least) already understand this when it comes to payment - people just need to realise “billing” and “rest of the world” aren’t the only two contexts.

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                people just need to realise “billing” and “rest of the world” aren’t the only two contexts.

                My favorite thing is when an e-commerce site has apparently separate names associated with your account as a whole, your billing address, and your shipping address, but they turn out to be not actually separate.

                For example: I purchased a gift for my mom recently from a dealer that specializes in that particular thing, and gave my name for both the account name and the billing address, but used her name and address as the shipping address. The initial “we’ve received your order but not begun processing it yet” email had my name in it, but subsequent emails have all had hers.

              2. 5

                in Germany you can register your artist name (Künstlername) easily and it will be put on both the ID card and passport, so that you can use it and identify yourself with it just like you can with your normal name.

                That’s pretty damn awesome.

                In Sweden changing your given names is a matter of an (online) form and a small fee.

                Your last name is a bit more expensive to change, as it has to be checked against “known names” (such as ancient noble names) but is still a matter of a e-id submission and payment of a fee.

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                  In Sweden changing your given names is a matter of an (online) form and a small fee.

                  That’s pretty awesome, I wish the government here would embrace online forms more. I don’t know how it works here but it should be fairly easy and inexpensive for people to change their names if they have a good reason for it (and it’s not done for fraud).

                  Your last name is a bit more expensive to change, as it has to be checked against “known names” (such as ancient noble names) but is still a matter of a e-id submission and payment of a fee.

                  I figure they also do checks to make sure you don’t name yourself anything weird (Hitler, Stalin, Mao?). Also, I know that some countries (France?) have white lists for names that are allowed, and I wonder if that still applies if you’re the one choosing it? Because it would kind of suck if your preferred name wasn’t “allowed” for some reason.

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                    The rules are here (in Swedish): https://www.skatteverket.se/privat/folkbokforing/namn/bytaefternamn.4.76a43be412206334b89800020669.html

                    It’s been liberalized these last years. Double surnames used to be verboten. Some stuff is new, such as the possibility to change surnames to a more gender-preferred form (in the case of languages where that’s an option).

                    Note that there’s quite a long wait time however.

                    Regarding “offensive” names, that’s definitely a rule. A famous case involved parents wanting to give their daughter the names “Adolfina Stalina”. They were denied.[1] But there’s a famous example of basic free-form poetry with first names (although the person seems to have tired of being the butt of internet jokes and changed it to Salkert): https://twitter.com/inalvsmat/status/414156476849340417

                    [1] it’s possible the person could choose those names as an adult. The case hinged on wether these names could cause the person difficulties while she was a child.

                2. 5

                  No, plenty of people are aware of her legal name, but even for them, that’s not her name in any meaningful sense and it would be weird to refer to her by it. The only people who refer to her by her legal name are bank officials, healthcare professionals, and civil servants, all of whom are quickly corrected.

                  Take a look at it from this perspective: if you were given a name at birth, but practically everybody knows and refers you by another name, even those who know your birth name, which one is in practical terms more your actual name? Arguably, it would be the name people actually use to refer to you regardless of what your birth certificate might say.

                  The idea of people having a fixed legal name is quite a modern one.

                  Quick addendum. Here’s another interesting case, and I fall into this. I have what might appear to be two legal names, or rather I have one legal name, which has two forms in two different languages. I make active use of both forms depending on the circumstances. I used the Irish form of my name in personal circumstances and the English form in professional circumstances, not least because of there being a preponderance in the world of people who don’t understand that not every language is English.

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                    Just to chime in on that addendum, since I originally omitted this from my comment: I also have two written forms of my name, in Gaelic and English. It’s just easier to use the English one in contexts where you’re going to be meeting new people more often than not and they’re unlikely to know the language. Both are my name though.

                    (It’s also my experience that people are happy to, and pretty good at, trying to guess the pronunciation of words, except when it comes to names, in which case they jump straight for the most incomprehensible one.)

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                    Last I checked it was absolutely not easy.

                    cf https://www.anwalt.de/rechtstipps/der-weg-zum-kuenstlernamen_040484.html - in German

                    Gegenüber der Behörde sind die Angaben über den Künstlernamen glaubhaft zu machen. Das bedeutet, dass man gegenüber der Behörde glaubhaft machen muss, dass man überregional unter diesem Künstlernamen bekannt ist.

                    Which basically means you should be “well-known by that name and not only locally” and the internet didn’t really count. Maybe today it’s different if you can prove you have a million of followers on any social media thing.

                    I’m not ruling out that a few nerds did that with their online nicknames, but I never heard anyone following through.

                3. 8

                  For a transgender person, their preferred name is absolutely their name, and given the serious obstacles in many places to name changes (cost, requirements to post in newspapers, requiring approval from a judge, or even just having not done so yet) their legal name is likely to not be their name.

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                    Any chance you can elaborate as to why?

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                      To me, a person’s legal name is their name, any other names someone or the people around them come up with (nick names, abbreviations, pseudonyms, affectionate names) are just aliases for the real name. I do agree, however, that more websites could skip asking for real name information and just ask for an alias (nickname), both for data protection reasons, and for convenience — there might be a lot of Patricks, but nobody else is going to pick a weird nickname like xfbs.

                      1. 12

                        To me, a person’s legal name is their name

                        And what of people whose name a legal system can’t or won’t represent?

                        And which legal name? Ones legal name can easily differ between regimes. Or even during time in a regime. Or have multiple legal names, in a single regime.

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                          And what of people whose name a legal system can’t or won’t represent?

                          What do you mean by that? I can think of two cases: either at birth, the name is rejected (for example, Adolf Hitler is a banned name in many jurisdictions) or someone has a name written in another writing system (then you’d have to write it phonetically?).

                          And which legal name? Ones legal name can easily differ between regimes. Or even during time in a regime. Or have multiple legal names, in a single regime.

                          What does the regime have to do with your name?

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                            What does the regime have to do with your name?

                            Ideally, nothing. In practice, it is your regime that sets up the laws for allowing or disallowing certain names.

                            For example, in France, breton names are routinely rejected by the current “regime” because they are not written according to the orthographic rules of the french language. Yet, breton is the language of people that have been living in the territory of the French state since before this state even existed. Heck, if I was born four years sooner my current name would be illegal (a Catalan name in fascist Spain). I would be extremely offended of being forced to use my legal, completely artificial, name.

                            The fact that something is “legal” does not make it legitimate. Some laws suck; and enforcing a “legal name” policy may suck as a result. Let us not increase the suckiness of the world by adopting this policy.

                            Another clear example is transgender people who live in countries where changing their name accordingly is illegal.

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                              And what of people whose name a legal system can’t or won’t represent?

                              What do you mean by that?

                              Those are two good cases. Here are some more:

                              • Names that don’t fit your language’s phonetics and cannot be transliterated accurately
                              • Names that aren’t phonetic (logograms, sign)
                              • Names with accents or “invalid” punctuation marks
                              • Names from a persecuted group or language

                              What does the regime have to do with your name?

                              In an ideal world, very little.

                              However, legal names are one way a regime makes their populace legible. As an example, my legal name is different in China (李毅) than it is in Taiwan (李逵) than it is in Australia (David Ryland Scott Robinson) than it is in the United States (Scott D Robinson and David Ryland Scott Robinson).

                          2. 10

                            I get the impression that your particular legal name is probably not markedly dissimilar from the name you are most commonly known by in real life – that is, you probably go by your legal first name or a shortened form of it – because I think it’s easy for someone who has no real problems with their legal name to view it as the one unequivocally “real” name that everyone has.

                            I, on the other hand, not entirely uncommonly for someone from my region, have three names: two given names and a surname, and (this is the not entirely uncommon part) I have never gone by my first name in any capacity except official/formal ones, and then only grudgingly or until I was able to state my preferred name. I introduce myself to people as Secondname Lastname. My immediate and extended family, friends, and lovers have all called me by my second name (or a common shortened form of it, in the case of friends and lovers). Even as a child when my parents were upset with me and would scoldingly call me by my “full” name, they never included the first name. Many people who I’ve known since becoming an adult (and whom I thus got to introduce myself to, instead of them learning my name from an instructor calling roll and me informing them of my preferred name) are surprised when they find out, such as by seeing my debit card when we’re paying at a restaurant, that the name they know me by isn’t my first name. On top of all this, lately I’ve even come to identify more with the nickname form of my second name than the name itself.

                            So at least in my case, my legal name is basically just an identifier that is starting to feel increasingly arbitrary, that I was saddled with at birth, and that doesn’t reflect the name by/with which I actually identify. And I’m not even trans or a member of some other group for whom the burden of their legal name is even more onerous; in that case it probably would actually be worth all the heartburn to change my legal name instead of just being mildly annoyed at all the things in my life that have my full legal name on them, and websites that address me as Firstname (or even better, the ol’ all-caps-because-it-passed-through-a-mainframe-on-the-way-to-the-frontend FIRSTNAME) instead of Secondname or Sec.

                            At least Amazon lets me bill things to Firstname Lastname but ship them to Sec Lastname…

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                              All of these comments are really amazing, I think I learned a lot. You have a good point there, I know of two similar cases, one is that I rarely bother to fill out my middle name anywhere even though it is technically part of my legal name, for brevity and because I don’t use it much. Also, I have a relative who, similar to you I suppose, has always been known by his second name.

                              I guess someone’s legal name still is their name, and that is important for a number of reasons, such as accountability, but the heuristic that people want to be addressed by their first name does not always hold. It doesn’t hold in Russia or the Netherlands (where people have diminutive forms of their names that they might want to use), not all countries might have a concept of first or last names, as we learned some people might not have names after all (one person mentioned Ashkenazi-jewish boys, who traditionally don’t get one until they are 8). Some people might have legal names that are not easily pronounceable (because they might use a different writing system). And, obviously, some people might have issues with their legal name for other reasons (such as a Spanish or French regime not allowing them to use the name they want, or if they are trans or something like that and their country doesn’t let them pick a name of the gender they prefer).

                            2. 8

                              I often mention this tweet in discussions like this one. For those who don’t want to read a tweet, it’s a lawyer complaining that a person with a Hispanic-style name like “Miguel Fernando Lopez Ortiz”, who goes by “Mike”, can be disadvantaged in the legal system because the governmant’s own “legal name” systems can’t handle this type of name well and may turn it into a huge number of aliases (“Miguel Ortiz ALIAS Miguel Lopez ALIAS Miguel Fernandez ALIAS Mike Ortiz ALIAS Mike Lopez…”), and the existence of a large number of aliases in records for a person is often treated as evidence of criminal intent (“why does he go by all these different names, if not to hide what he’s doing”).

                              What’s your solution to that?

                              Or to the fact that my “legal name” is one that’s hard for many systems to represent correctly, even though it’s a fairly common case? I was given the same name as my father, so I legally have a “Junior” in my name; I’ve been listed in various systems, including quite official ones, under FIRST LASTJR (wrong), FIRSTJR LAST (wrong), FIRST MIDDLEJR LAST (wrong), etc.

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                                Oh, wait. It took me a while to understand that. So, in the US, it is common to have multiple given names (middle names) but hispanic people have multiple last names, so his first name is Miguel and his last names are “Fernando Lopez Ortiz”, and so the system has to create aliases because any one of those last names are technically valid, and that looks suspicious because it looks like he’s known under multiple, different names when actually they are all his one, regular, legal name?

                                What’s your solution to that?

                                I’ve no idea, perhaps fix the system? Legal systems should be able to deal with people from other cultures properly anyways, so they should be able to represent “alien” names (especially in the US I suppose, where everyone is “alien” unless they are natives).

                                Also, I did not know that the “junior” thing is actually part of a legal name! I thought people in the US just named themselves after their father (something that I don’t think is very common here in Germany, or Europe, but I might be wrong) and then used “junior” and “senior” to disambiguate.

                                1. 3

                                  In naming traditions descended from Spanish culture, it’s common to have a composite first part to the name (so “Miguel Fernando” would be the given name, and should not be split into “Miguel” and “Fernando”). And it is common to have two family/surnames, one taken from each parent. Traditionally the first surname is taken from the father’s first surname, and the second is taken from the mother’s first surname; when sorting, the first surname is used first (so “Miguel Fernandez Lopez Ortiz” sorts under “L” by surname, not “O”).

                                  And that’s without getting into more complex situations like a saint’s name.

                              2. 3

                                that’s very cool and not at all reductive to say especially considering you live in a country that has a proven track record of denying representation to people whose real name isn’t their legal name and who want to set the record straight

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                                  that’s very cool and not at all reductive to say especially considering you live in a country […]

                                  Be nice.

                              3. 1

                                Is @twee both your “preferred name” and name?

                                1. 4

                                  It’s my preferred name for internet accounts, a point that I believe was addressed in the article:

                                  It almost certainly doesn’t identify them uniquely, and importantly, it need not bear any relation to their “legal name”. As software engineers, we are descendents of a proud heritage of hackers who often take great pleasure in assigning and using names, called “handles”, which are completely unrelated to their given or legal names.

                                  In real life people don’t refer to me as “twee”. But I’m not sure how that relates to @xfbs’s statement, which was what I don’t quite understand. Apologies if that’s just confusion on my part.

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                                    @xfbs followed up with their perspective. I don’t agree with it.

                                    But, to my response, I was drawing the difference between “preferred name” and “name.”

                              4. 4

                                In UK law, “legal name” isn’t really something that exists - insomuch as it does, it’s the same thing as a “preferred name. You might have a name registered with specific legal entities (the DVLA, the Home Office, the HMRC), and those are often more strictly regulated - for instance, the homeoffice will deny passport applications where the name is a swearword. Quoting Home Office guidelines: “The name by which a person wishes to be known is a matter for the individual.”

                                1. 4

                                  This is actually quite common in the Netherlands. For example, my name is Martin, but this is not my legal name, which is different and has two middle names. I don’t really publish this name on the internet (as a small barrier for potential identity theft), but usually it’s fancy names given to you during your baptism. It’s perhaps a bit less common for kids born today, but the majority of people over 30 have it.

                                  Most Dutch forms distinguish between your colloquial every-day name and full legal name when this matters.

                                  I actually got in to some problems with this after I moved abroad, I introduced myself as Martin (which is what everyone calls me, including my mother) but then later it turned out I wasn’t “Martin” at all; for example my ISP refused to help me as I said “Hi, this is Martin speaking, [..]” on the phone (English pedanticness, sigh). My (English) girlfriend at the time also filled in some council tax forms etc. with my colloquial name, and had some problems using this as a “proof of address”.

                                  Now I just fill in my legal name everywhere, which is hard to pronounce for most non-Dutch people and I have to tell them to just call me Martin; it would be helpful everyone if I could just fill in both 🤷‍♂️ When I went to the A&E after I broke my arm a few years ago I could see it was my turn just by the look of of puzzlement and horror every time the staff called me out for triage, x-rays, and doctor consultancy, heh.

                                  Granted, all of this is probably a pretty rare thing if you’re working on a system somewhere in the US, but generally speaking names are hard (“falsehoods people believe about names”) with many different edge cases and while I don’t really care how you call me, some people place a high value on this kind of thing.

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                                    off topic, but i do get a kick out of the way most native english speakers recoil at dutch names like rutger, martijn, thijs etc.

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                                      That’s actually really fascinating! I’ve never heard about that here in Germany. So where do these colloquial names originate, also from your parents or do they develop during childhood?

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                                        That’s actually really fascinating! I’ve never heard about that here in Germany.

                                        It does exist in German(y) as well. As has been pointed out in another reply to you, it’s usually a shortened version of your full first name. In German it’s called the “Rufname”. To give a traditional German example, my neighbor (who has passed the 70 since quite a while) has “Wilhelm” as his first name. His wife, just as everybody else, calls him by “Willi”. Anywhere he needs to give an official address, he of course uses the full form of the name, and it’s what is placed on his mailbox.

                                        1. 3

                                          (Not the person you responded to but also from the Netherlands.)

                                          The colloquial name is the name your parents give you, usually the ‘official’ name is just a longer/more traditional name that that name was derived from.

                                          So for example my name is Daan but my ‘official’ name is Daniël, for someone called Tom it would be Thomas etc.

                                          1. 3

                                            From the parents. In @daanvdk’s examples the names are somewhat similar and the initials match, but note that differences can be larger. E.g. my sister’s official first name is Catharina, but her colloquial name is Karin.

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                                              Usually it’s just a shorter less fancy version of the full name. e.g. Johannus is John, Johan, Sjonnie, etc.

                                            2. 2

                                              Yeah, that’s about how I would imagine it, with the problems you mentioned.

                                              I’m not a big fan of not being able to choose anything, but looking at the possible problems until there’s a global shift or unification in how people use names I guess some of us have to live with using the legal name for all paperwork anyway.

                                              Again, I’ve heard stories of people getting problems when airline tickets didn’t have their full legal names. so where do you draw the line? Is it worth having your non-legal name on the power bill and credit card, but airline tickets must be legal name again? Isn’t this a bit like having different online identities and not trying to leak information so they can’t be correlated? I guess people will just have to try if it works, and in your case, give up at some point.

                                            3. 4

                                              The name I use day-to-day is not my legal name. In fact, the name on my email, my book, and all my published articles is not my legal name, either. Most people don’t even know I have a different legal name. The only time I use my legal name is for government correspondence.

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                                                so what about the case where one person has multiple different legal names in different legal systems? which one is their “name”?

                                                i downvoted this as troll since this comment is low-effort, doesn’t offer any useful insight (why do you disagree with this?), and i honestly don’t see how it’s possible to come to this conclusion after having thought about this even a little bit.

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                                                I’m hitting this hard right now with GUI programming. The only good cross platform options still seem to be “Use C++ and QT” or “Use C and GTK+”.

                                                Edit: Suggestions welcome…

                                                1. 7

                                                  Why not use a binding that does the grunt work of interfacing with C or C++? There are two good Qt bindings for Python (PyQt and PySide). There are good bindings for Gtk+ for many languages. (Though Gtk+ is pretty horrible outside X11/Wayland.)

                                                  1. 6

                                                    Red language has a native cross-platform (Win32, Cocoa and GTK backends) GUI system with declarative DSL on top of it.

                                                  1. 9

                                                    I’ve been considering taking on a project in this line for a while but haven’t had the need for it recently - I’ve got a Kodak Pakon, which is a bulk film scanner that drug stores used back in the days of 1 hour photo development. Unfortunately the driver is Windows XP only, and I’d really love to use it without running a VM.

                                                    1. 1

                                                      Can I ask where you got that device? Is the quality of the scans good?

                                                      1. 3

                                                        I got mine on the second hand market from someone who got it from whichever drug store liquidated it - Walgreens, I think? - and yeah! It scans at 6MP, which is a little low by modern standards but meets all my requirements from film, and it has really excellent color reproduction. The real killer feature is that it can scan an entire roll of 35mm film without any interaction. You see them on ebay pretty frequently, there’s a couple different versions but the most common is the F135 that I have.

                                                      2. 1

                                                        The lack of drivers is exactly what has kept me away from acquiring a Pakon, hoping someone will write a FOSS driver of some kind.

                                                      1. 8

                                                        This is a fun list :)

                                                        I’ve been using Go Mono for about a year now I think, and it’s been a real treat. I feel like ligatures are more of a personal opinion thing than a legibility thing, but I really like them.

                                                        1. 4

                                                          When Go Mono came out I switched and never back. Sublime.

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                                                            Was on iosevka term slab (another serif font), but I’m digging go mono.

                                                          1. 4

                                                            Sheldon Brown’s entire site is a treasure.

                                                            I’ve built my own wheels for two bicycles now, to add dynamo lighting to each. I can’t overstate how wonderful never having to think about charging my bicycle lights is - it’s the single best upgrade I think can be done to a bicycle (at least one primarily used for transportation)

                                                            1. 17

                                                              Do not delete the path part of that URL, yikes.

                                                              Anyway, what is “Suckless”? That’s what I was trying to see, and instead got an image of a naked man holding a bottle of wine.

                                                              1. 16

                                                                For Suckless, see https://suckless.org/, not the users subdomain.

                                                                It’s a project/group related to cat-v and classical-unix/plan9 advocacy, rejecting tools that “suck” and wanting to replace them with “simpler” alternatives (dwm for window managment, st for terminals, dmenu for reading keyboard input, …). This often entails that configurations have to be applied pre-compilation and that the default distributions of various tools and projects are pretty lean – hence additional features are collected as patches, which are listed here, showing which can be successfully applied, and which can’t.

                                                                1. 4

                                                                  I can report that dwm and st are great tools.

                                                                  The only hitch is recompiling them after modifying their configuration files, which are written in C. Many people don’t like this. Some, like myself, don’t mind.

                                                                  1. 3

                                                                    I used st (off and on) for a while (~1yr), and for me the biggest annoyance was having to rebase some patches when multiple patches modify similar lines of code. Once that headache was resolved, it was generally OK unless some st commits triggered rebasing some stuff again. Basically it was all the fun of maintaining your own branch of st with patches someone else wrote.

                                                                2. 13

                                                                  Suckless was in its heyday around the time of the systemd eruption, as far as I know. This would be around 2010. Slightly prior was this one weird viral video of an artist named Gunther, a self-styled “sex prophet,” who made the rounds with a (completely SFW in the most technical of senses, though apparently not germane to your sensibilities, bheisler, which is fine with me, thus this explanatory note to lessen the blow of freakishness herein) music video called “Ding Ding Dong.” Pop music beats, euro summer beach ditzy style. Not amazing, but pretty good, definitely unique. The naked man is that same gunther. Just wanted to clear that up, because this is a clear case of an overreaction to a misunderstood joke. As far as I know, the suckless community was and is to the extent that it still exists, pretty insular. Probably didn’t anticipate being posted on an HN style board

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                                                                    Probably didn’t anticipate being posted on an HN style board

                                                                    Lobste.rs has even “suckless developer” hat used by several people. Not quite buying the unanticipated part.

                                                                    1. 1

                                                                      Reasonable.

                                                                      Would you, however, admit that Gunther, the individual who presumably is the man behind gunther.suckless org, is not the OP of this link?

                                                                      In admitting this, if you do admit this, are you not therefore forced to agree with me that the post we’re discussing was not intentionally put forth as a display of nudity to eyes averse to that same nudity?

                                                                      If a list of patches to utilities and other programs is hosted at a path of a subdomain which contains the image a naked man holding a vertical wine bottle (with suggestive verticality) is posted without awareness of the suggestive verticality of said bottle, then can’t we conclude that the proximate nature of that suggestively vertical bottle to said list of patches to utilities and programs is in some sense accidental, and therefore unanticipated?

                                                                      By this argument, I intend to demonstrate that your claim, while seemingly reasonable, is eliding the quite clear nature of the circumstances, in an effort to maintain that all suckless developers and subdomain holders should be aware of all possible audiences for their online “speech” (or however you wish to define what the image is), when in fact it is absurd to believe that all speech of all suckless developers would be anticipated to agree with all possible audiences. I’m afraid that, unless Gunther appears to justify his position, we’ll have to remain in a misunderstanding silence regarding the reason why a suggestively vertical bottle and naked man are so closely associated with this list of patches.

                                                                      I tried to explain it, because it seemed necessary to explain, to me. Perhaps one day, your doubt regarding this explanation will itself be exposed to the eyes of someone on a far away news site, and they will be as horrified as if they had seen a vertical and suggestively placed bottle.

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        @varjag simply wanted to inform you that @FRIGN not only has an account here, but also has the [suckess.org developer] hat. So a lot of the community knows about Suckless (presumably not @bheisler, who asked the question in the first place).

                                                                        I must confess to be in the same position as @bheisler. I knew of suckless, but had no idea what the linked page meant in context of that project.

                                                                    2. 3

                                                                      So the guy probably thought since he had the same name as this weirdo that for internet reasons (remember when memes were cool and unique signifiers of in-group identification?) it would naturally follow to have him around on the ol’ personal page

                                                                      1. 2

                                                                        Sorry for the long-winded explanation, but I miss the old web, and I am not even old! Would you, Herr heisler, have been hip to a tidy game of Flash-powered Sandspiel, even if it were on a subdomain of ebaumsworld?

                                                                    3. 8

                                                                      The suckless project makes and maintains a bunch of Unix programs that meet their definition of “sucking less” - http://suckless.org/philosophy/

                                                                      I’ve been caught off guard by them offering personal subdomains on their site before, too - suckless.org is SFW, but any individual subdomain?

                                                                      I use and like dwm when I can.

                                                                      1. 17

                                                                        They like to send mail from hosts with names like wolfsschanze. You can also see FRIGN’s opinion about diversity as shared on lobsters. Or the time someone pointed out there are torchlit marches at suckless conferences and someone else asked FRIGN to clarify and he basically admitted to being a white nationalist, complete with dogwhistles like “cultural marxism”?

                                                                        I’m not saying that suckless is definitely a white nationalist organization but I am saying someone would have to do a lot of work to convince me otherwise.

                                                                        1. 4

                                                                          Must we do this everytime someone posts something suckless related? Can we please just talk about technology instead of all this political nonsense and random accusations?

                                                                          1. 13

                                                                            Look, for every person who thinks this is “political nonsense and random accusations,” there’s at least one person who thinks this is so damning that they want literally nothing to do with suckless ever again.

                                                                            And despite Lobster’s general “politics is off-topic” policy, this thread is literally someone asking “what is ‘Suckless’?”, so if it’s on-topic anywhere, it’s here.

                                                                            1. 2

                                                                              Please see my reply above.

                                                                              1. 5

                                                                                Um. Welcome to lobsters? A couple of words to a wise guy:

                                                                                1. Your previous comment is not “above” this one. The whole tree gets reordered based on upvotes.
                                                                                2. That stream-of-consciousness-wall-of-text style may play well wherever @enkiv2 invited you from, but it’s gauche here. At least, I find it exhausting more than amusing.
                                                                                3. For heaven’s sake, please don’t feed the trolls! No matter how many big buckets of troll slop you may have handy.
                                                                                1. 0

                                                                                  Thank you, minimax! – for your welcome, since it is utterly welcoming. A couple more words in response, and whether they contain a wisdom equivalent to my similar and apparently inherent quality of same is entirely your determination. I am so grateful to have run into an authority on these matters. Perhaps you can finally solve the trolley problem for us all, and divide good people from bad ones, as you scry into your palantir of forum posts.

                                                                                  To wit -

                                                                                  (1) My previous comment is in a tree of comments.

                                                                                  (a) What is the precise and preferred nomenclature, such that an ignoramus could understand?

                                                                                  (b) In the sense that a tree (such as this comment tree) goes from a single node to plenty of nodes, is it entirely inappropriate to say “above” in order to indicate, where n is the depth indicated away from the origin, trunk, root, or base of the tree, the position n - 1? I understand if your perspective is like the protagonist of Ender’s game, and you feel like n-1 compared to n is down, not up, but Ender held that of his enemies, and I am not yours. Are you mine?

                                                                                  (2) I don’t care. Actually, like a total four-year-old, I feel an evil glee.

                                                                                  (a) When you say, “stream-of-consciousness-wall-of-text,” you are committing a grammatical error by hypenating between “chunks” of words. One noun is “stream-of-consciousness” and the other is “wall-of-text,” and, while neither necessitates hyphens, it is an elegant stylistic choice, and redounds back upon my usage of “implied-by-you.” But the nouns you connected simply don’t need to be joined. In fact, they should be separated by a comma. I’m running out of breath just looking at it.

                                                                                  (b) Gauche – what is the meaning of this word in the sense you’re applying?

                                                                                  (b, cont.) John Ohno is no concern of yours in this regard, is he? What are you, a partisan of webbiness that wants to condemn hypertext? What beef could you possibly have with the guy? How do you even go from his proto-post-communism on the one hand and quasi-Ludditic radically conservative ideals of “small computing” on the other, to me? Am I to consider you as thinking that my response, “below,” (in opposition to ngoldbaum’s unfair condemnation of an entire ideal of technical practice in contemporary FOSS on the basis of his own flawed reasoning, equating cultural marxism, which predates the ilk whom ngoldbaum is, in abject ignorance, confusingly attempting to condemn, by about 45 years) the same as enkiv2’s opinions?

                                                                                  (b, cont.) That you find it exhausting to read: good for you. :)

                                                                                  (3) This would be humorless, except it is meaningless.

                                                                                  Please, oh minimax, solve the trolley problem, since you know how to identify trolls and can give advice to the gauche. I am happy to lay on the tracks if you want to flip that switch to experimentally determine once and for all whether it is worth saving some arbitrary group of people as opposed to me. Regarding the basic subject matter at hand, which is suckless, and someone’s unfair-in-my-opinion (see how that’s grammatical?) condemnation of suckless, I should say that I find a policy of opposition to affirmative action intolerant. I support techne, and it follows that I support suckless. It does not therefore follow that I support what ngoldbaum very confusedly understands to be a persecution of the Jews by FRIGN. This seems absurd to have to point out, but here we are. Again: I find intolerance disgusting. I also find vendettas disgusting. Lastly, I find hubris disgusting. I am painfully aware that I, too, sadly lack the cleanliness that would come with an absence of this very quality. However, you have to admit, your hubris in judging me is incomparably greater than my hubris in defending myself against your allegations of . . .

                                                                                  1. Being a “wise guy.”
                                                                                  2. Having a “gauche” “style.”
                                                                                  3. Having an exhausting and unamusing style.
                                                                                  4. Feeding the trolls, in contradiction to the “sake of heaven.”
                                                                                  5. Having handy “troll slop.”

                                                                                  Your welcome is most welcome.

                                                                                  And you’re welcome.

                                                                                  Regards,

                                                                                  Myself

                                                                                  P.S.: “A couple of words” is merely a figure of speech! And you don’t have to type “um,” even if you habitually say it!

                                                                                  1. 4

                                                                                    This sardonic flippancy is tedious and unwelcome. Please treat others better than this.

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      Noted

                                                                                    2. 1

                                                                                      (a) What is the precise and preferred nomenclature, such that an ignoramus could understand?

                                                                                      I prefer to simply provide a link to the comment.

                                                                                      (2) I don’t care. Actually, like a total four-year-old, I feel an evil glee.

                                                                                      This is not a good attitude to have on Lobste.rs.

                                                                                      (b) Gauche – what is the meaning of this word in the sense you’re applying?

                                                                                      I’m not @minimax, but I would read it as “socially awkward”.

                                                                                      (b, cont.) John Ohno is no concern of yours in this regard, is he?

                                                                                      Actually he is, as he invited you and has a certain responsibility for that invitation.

                                                                                      1. 2

                                                                                        Yeah, um, @lettucehead, please don’t get yourself banned. I would not have invited you if I didn’t expect you to acknowledge community norms & practices.

                                                                                        1. 0

                                                                                          I just saw your reply to this thread, and I want to thank you again for the invite, and assure you that I won’t be a troll or otherwise possess sardonic flippancy in the future. Well I will try to tone it down. A lot.

                                                                                          I still have all my questions from this thread (how the heck can somebody using the words “cultural Marxism” to discuss radical forms of Marxism having to do with culture, which are genuine phenomena, be considered an anti-Semitic “dogwhistle?” Why was I considered a troll for pointing out this exhausting and unfair absurdity? Will pushcx ever change his mind about my sardonic flippancy, and see it for the charmingly wonderful firehose of Furby-faced unicorns it really is? Like the center of a Tootsie Pop’s per-lick depth scalar, the world may never know)… Thus I have decided to just let it go. Or maybe I’ll start a tech blog and collect $20 from Drew DeVault.

                                                                                          I just wanted to make a splash. I will certainly be more careful moving fwd, and not imperil your reputation. Any further than you yourself do all the time with all the “small computing” heresies I hear you’ve been spreading among the faithful, turning Microsoft customers into the reprobate worshippers of Alan Kay. Tsk, tsk. Cheers

                                                                            2. 1

                                                                              Hey, because minimax decided to play mod with my “gauche style,” and I suspect he just disagrees with what he believes to be my assumptions about what you said, I have some further, legitimate, serious questions. What can you say to substantiate your reduction of the “stream-of-consciousness, wall-of-text style” (to use minimax’s phrase with my improvement) post by which FRIGN “[clarified,] and … basically admitted to being a white nationalist,” in the torchlit marches link, above?

                                                                              I’m honestly confused, I just don’t see how you get that from what he said. Can you, please, substantiate your reduction of what he actually said, to what you said he said?

                                                                              Or, can you remove your unnecessarily politicizing post, in violation of pushcx’s general wishes for this forum? I will happily delete (or respect the deletion of) my replies to it, so that we’re “even.” But let it be known, I do wish substantive answers because I am sincerely curious about your opinion and understanding, and would rather not have the kabosh put on a polite and principled discussion. We’re all crustaceans here, instead of denizens of the orange site, because the discussion is of a much higher quality. At least, that’s what I’m here for, and I care deeply about that.

                                                                              I should also add that I never would have been aware of any rift between certain members of this community were it not for one of your posts on almost the exact same subject several months ago, and while I have picked on specific points of contention regarding the “dogwhistles,” I was glad to receive the intelligence represented by your… saintly screeds… in this regard, both initially and now.

                                                                          1. 9

                                                                            At work a HHKB Professional 2, I’m in love with this keyboard. At home Im trying to learn to use the ergodox ez with a dvorak layout (I’ve built a custom firmware that ties very well with my environment of i3, vim, tmux, etc), I also have a filco majestouch 2 and a Model M

                                                                            1. 3

                                                                              I also use and love an HHKB Pro 2 at work. I’ve replaced the controller board with one of Haasu’s units in order to be able to program it myself with QMK - I used this primarily to get play/pause/skip buttons in addition to the volume buttons in the default keyboard map, but also have tap-and-release on the shift keys type parentheses.

                                                                              I’d like to add that I type using the Colemak keyboard layout - I switched in college when I was starting to experience RSI, and the option of fixing it for “free” by switching layout was really attractive. I’m glad I use it, and still do, but I’m not sure I would learn it again if I had to do it over. Proper ergonomics makes a bigger difference, and it takes me a second any time I sit down at someone else’s PC to recalibrate myself. Trying to use it on Windows is also a pain, though Dvorak is better in this regard.

                                                                            1. 6

                                                                              Windows 10 S’s intent is for education, it’s supposed to be a locked down system that a kid can’t fuck up by mistake. While blocking third-party browsers is very sketchy, the reasoning on the surface is sound to me. I’m not worried about it unless they started doing this in Windows 10 home or (lol) enterprise.

                                                                              But yeah, clearly Microsoft is making a play to get the next gen of kids used to using Microsoft hardware/software, just like Apple and Google have been doing. All of those things are pretty dumb. Don’t act like you’re working in the interest of education when really you’re acting in your own interest.

                                                                              1. 7

                                                                                I suspect we don’t disagree on this, but I would argue also that the changes they are making “in the name of education” actively work against it. There is value in teaching programs from outside of the Windows store - whether it be programs used in industry in STEM fields or the ability to run and use libre software, or just as a means of teaching basic computer literacy.

                                                                                1. 13

                                                                                  Teaching about computers requires open platforms. Teaching some other subject with computers (practically speaking) requires a locked-down platform, particularly if you’re talking about K-8 or even K-12. As someone who used to work in academic technology, general-purpose computers are terrible teaching tools because they’re just too flexible and therefore too easy to “screw up”.

                                                                                  I supported an online BS in nursing program for awhile. We provided Windows laptops to all students to make sure they had what they needed to participate in their courses, but inevitably a good half of the students would end up with unusable computers halfway through the semester due to malware of various sorts (some of it installed intentionally).

                                                                                  If they’d been running Windows 10 S or some other locked-down platform we might have had a little more work up front to get them configured, and we might have had to choose different course delivery tools in some cases, but the experience for the students would have been vastly superior.

                                                                                  1. 5

                                                                                    I think you kind of hit the nail on the head. I’ve seen teachers in my state who are trying to jump on board the whole “STEM” bandwagon by getting funding to buy all the students Ipads.

                                                                                    I think they missed the point. Most kids don’t really need to learn how to use a tablet in school, and if they do that’s not really STEM, but maybe still useful.

                                                                                    You could have some useful apps that were on a tablet. I can imagine it being kind of fun to use a tablet as a big graphing calculator with a 3d plot I can spin around. Or for exploring chemical formulas. So basically it’s a multimedia tool.

                                                                                    If you want to teach them about computers, give them something like the pi platform or arduino platform. Let them blink a light. There’s so many great software engineers who got their start entering stuff into a BASIC prompt. Let kids do that with python or even basic. This can totally be integrated with math class. The first program I ever wrote converted rectangular coordinates to polar and vice versa.

                                                                                    1. 2

                                                                                      There’s certainly an argument to be made that teaching computers and how they work should be done similar to automobiles - that the vast majority of users should be fine with just using the surface layers and not needing a deep understanding on how to repair or maintain it.

                                                                                      However, some people are going to need to learn how computers work. If the school provides a single computer that is locked down, then in order to learn it that person requires a second fully general-purpose computer - and right now, the only difference between those two computers would be the software running on them.

                                                                                      I agree that teaching about computers requires open platforms, but I disagree on your point that teaching other subjects requires locking it down - there is a tradeoff to be made here. The less locked down the system is, the more overhead involved in teaching a course using that system, but also the more reusability in the system for further purposes.

                                                                                      If the machines being sold in this manner were significantly less expensive, such as Chromebooks in the $200 range, then I would be more willing to accept having multiple computers as a solution, but here this is clearly positioned as the student’s primary and only computer.

                                                                                      1. 5

                                                                                        I agree that for students who need to learn about computers this is inefficient, but I think you underestimate the pain associated with trying to teach other subjects when the students are using systems they fully control.

                                                                                        The number of people who need to learn about computer versus with computers is relatively small, particularly, as I said, in K-12. It is tempting, I think, for people like us to reminisce about how simple and flexible computers were at some point in the past and all the fun we had fiddling with things. However, as computers are used more and more for teaching other subjects (see the next paragraph), I really think that it will become worthwhile to just expect some students to have two machines, or to provide labs for the students who need them.

                                                                                        That being said, I agree with you that $1,000 for a locked-down machine is a little steep. But then, I am also deeply cynical about the movement toward using computers to teach other subjects in general. I just don’t think computers, as they are commonly used for teaching, bring anything of value to the table. Simply forcing kids to use computers also doesn’t help them learn to be any more “computer savvy” in reality, so all in all it’s just a bunch of money dumped down the toilet.

                                                                                        1. 3

                                                                                          I’d believe that I’m wrong about the number of K-12 students who need to learn about computers. There’s a lot of debate over the question of “should everyone learn to program” - and I suspect the answer to “what kind of computers should be used in education” probably hinges on that. On the other hand, I’ve used a relatively basic level of knowledge about computers to solve personal pain points many times - I’m inclined to believe that teaching students enough computer knowledge to do basic things with an arduino is probably as useful as teaching them calculus. I can certainly see where you’re coming from, and given that premise I can’t disagree with you.

                                                                                          I agree with your last point - the only situation I’ve seen computers be of value in non-computer related classes is to enable remote students. I’m sure there are others, I see very little evidence of people taking advantage of them.

                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                            I’m inclined to believe that teaching students enough computer knowledge to do basic things with an arduino is probably as useful as teaching them calculus.

                                                                                            I completely agree with you that it is valuable, unfortunately I don’t think it’s being done and probably won’t be done any time soon (at least not well). Ideally, I think kids would learn how to actually use computers and then they wouldn’t have as much trouble later on.

                                                                                            I occasionally teach a CS class at the local public university. This semester I wrote test suites for my labs and taught the students how to run them with Gradle so they could self-evaluate before they turned each one in. I was shocked at how many students didn’t seem to fully understand the concept of files and directories, which made it difficult to teach them how to use Gradle from the command line.

                                                                                            But then I pondered it a bit and I realized that almost every piece of software today, even desktop software, attempts to abstract the filesystem away so people just end up thinking that their Word documents are somehow inside of MS Word and, in my case, that their Java programs are somehow inside of the IDE.

                                                                                            This is just one example. It’s a crappy situation, but I’m just not sure how to make it better. Hiring people competent enough in these areas, at the K-8 level in particular, to teach them well seems like a tall order. Maybe time will solve the problem slowly.

                                                                                      2. 1

                                                                                        a good half of the students would end up with unusable computers halfway through the semester due to malware of various sorts (some of it installed intentionally)

                                                                                        … and they all learned something from the experience, maybe just not what they were meant to :)

                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                          Hehe, yep… But seriously, that’s really the problem. There’s just no time in the curriculum to let the kids experiment and break things and learn something from it. I broke things hundreds of times when I was first learning about computers as a kid. But it was on my own time and I had a personal teacher (dad) to help me figure things out. That’s just such a hard process to replicate in a classroom. It would be tremendously valuable if someone were to figure it out, however.

                                                                                      3. 2

                                                                                        You’re absolutely right I agree with you. I do think that massive tech companies targeting education is good, but not ideal. The best approach to computer/internet literacy education would be to do so with Libre software - providing the opportunity for students to learn about all of the tech, not just living within a company ecosystem.

                                                                                      4. 1

                                                                                        The fact it shipped on the Surface Laptop (which is allegedly for higher education students but launched in a K-12 event…) is questionable - it should be shipping on 200$ machines, not competing against MacBooks. (Counterpoint: Chromebook Pixel. Counter-counterpoint: Chromebook Pixel being a sales failure.)

                                                                                        Microsoft is the master of confused messaging.

                                                                                        1. 1

                                                                                          You’re right - shipping the Surface Laptop with Windows 10s by default is very sketch. It does allow upgrading to windows 10 pro ‘seamlessly’ which is good. I guess if you’re going to college for humanities or something and just using word/onenote/excel that would be a reasonable (In that I should be able to get my studies done) but silly that it doesn’t allow 3rd party applications.

                                                                                          But yeah. That is very mixed messaging.

                                                                                          1. 1

                                                                                            10 S runs third party applications - even Win32 ones. They just need to come from the store. I’m not sure if AppX sideloading is enabled.

                                                                                      1. 8

                                                                                        A primer on the Command Line Interface. I’ll be posting once a week, and would love to get fellow lobsters feedback – what stuff do you wish you knew when you were learning the CLI? What things should I explain as simply as possible? My main audience is total newcomers to the CLI.

                                                                                        Topics I’ll be covering soon:

                                                                                        • simple commands (ls, cd, pwd)
                                                                                        • how to find and read man pages
                                                                                        • why is the CLI awesome
                                                                                        • how to find files

                                                                                        And then in the future:

                                                                                        • environment variables
                                                                                        • hidden files
                                                                                        • pipes
                                                                                        • users / groups / permissions
                                                                                        • log files
                                                                                        1. 8

                                                                                          In addition to the tools used on the command line, efficiencies in using the shell are also going to make a huge impact for new users - things like sudo !! and basic readline bindings like C-w and C-a for editing the line.

                                                                                          1. 3

                                                                                            I would add !g, which executes the last command that started with g.

                                                                                            1. 2

                                                                                              Thanks! Yeah, there are probably some people who’ve been using the CLI for a while that that kind of stuff could help too.

                                                                                            2. 3

                                                                                              a guide to preserving and searching your complete bash history (e.g. https://sanctum.geek.nz/arabesque/better-bash-history/) perhaps coupled with some sort of log rotation scheme to archive it and start a new one every so often (but keep the old ones searchable)

                                                                                              1. 3

                                                                                                Will the site be OS-agnostic? I think it would be neat to cover a general topic and say “this is how it’s done in OpenBSD, but this is how it’s done in many Linux distributions, and this is how it’s done on a Mac.”

                                                                                              1. 6

                                                                                                Great article, in the line of the other one where actual performance of alists vs trees vs hashtables was compared.

                                                                                                In school I learned that the only data structure that made sense for text editing was a rope – who could argue against the complexity analysis? Later I learned gap buffers also gave performance good enough for the real world. Imagine how surprised I was to learn that the text editor I use just stores an array of strings!

                                                                                                1. 7

                                                                                                  There was a period of time when I was implementing a toy text editor. I spent a few days writing a gapbuffer implementation after doing a bunch of reading, but eventually I hit a bug and, pressed for time, decided to just use an array of strings. And bugger me, I couldn’t tell the difference using it.

                                                                                                1. 1

                                                                                                  It likes to color grass green

                                                                                                  This seems like a good thing to me :P

                                                                                                  1. 9

                                                                                                    Is there a link to a recording of the talk?

                                                                                                    1. 7

                                                                                                      I don’t know if they’ve gave up, but their software has definitely started sucking.

                                                                                                      One example that’s affecting me right now: The app store icon on my MBP shows there are 4 updates available, but if I click through to the Update page and click “Update” or “Update All” nothing happens. They’ve been available for days, and for days I’ve been unable to update them. Sometimes a spinning icon shows up in the corner by the forward/backwards arrows, but the updates never install.

                                                                                                      Another example: iCloud on my phone. It prompts for my password every 5 seconds, even though I click “Not Now” and don’t want to use it. So I tried to disable it. But I need to sign in to disable it?!? So then it starts prompting even more often trying to get the password to sign out. It was practically DOSing me trying to use my phone yesterday.

                                                                                                      And don’t get me started on how “Radio” and “Apple Music” have infiltrated the Music app and iTunes. I already buy my music on Amazon, I’m not interested. Yet they’re still there, apparently impossible to disable, and at least on iOs it seems to be the default screen when the app loads.

                                                                                                      They just keep screwing up every little thing in the most annoying possible ways. I’m not planning on upgrading my hardware any time soon, so I’m locked in for now, but I’m certainly not buying Apple when it’s time to upgrade.

                                                                                                      1. 4

                                                                                                        I don’t really see a regression - the Mac App Store and iTunes have always been crappy :). I have been pretty happy with the last two iterations of OS X. It seems that it has been getting some more attention after some years of stagnancy. E.g. El Capitan is much snappier on our Macs. I like the relatively new support for extensions, e.g. Finder and Photos.app extensions. System Integrity Protection seems good for family that every now and then manage to install dubious software.

                                                                                                        Hardware-wise, I really like my new MacBook 12", it’s beautiful, light, has a great screen, and I like the keyboard. Yes, they should’ve put in at least two USB-C ports. I don’t really have an opinion on iDevices anymore, since I switched to Android two years ago.

                                                                                                        tl;dr: to me it seems like business as usual, with occasional brilliance (MacBook 12", which will probably remove some of its limitations in the next iteration).

                                                                                                        1. 2

                                                                                                          the Mac App Store and iTunes have always been crappy

                                                                                                          If you include iOS’s music app in “iTunes” then I disagree. iOS2’s music player was big leap forward from the clickwheel design (I never used iOS1 but I assume it was the same) and there wasn’t significant backwards movement until iOS 7 and 8. Progress was slow (sorting names in subtly different order on unicode values outside ascii relative to iTunes, the addition of playlist editing, etc) but it wasn’t until they replaced “back” with “see a screen full of apple advertisements” that it became clear we were headed in the wrong direction.

                                                                                                        2. 1

                                                                                                          It’s illustrative, I think, that your complaints here are all with Apple’s services infrastructure and design.

                                                                                                          1. 5

                                                                                                            Do you want some UI complaints? Try enabling bigger fonts.

                                                                                                            Use the iOS9 todo list app. The text field is clipped and you can’t see what you are typing (bug reported). Now go to the contacts app. Too easy to get wrong, right? And a PHONE NUMBER! Once you have entered 5 numbers, the field goes offscreen and you can’t see what you are typing (bug also reported).

                                                                                                            I don’t think they’ve given up. I think they are focusing on the “industrial design blink” and completely forgot usability. Ive without Steve.

                                                                                                            1. 1

                                                                                                              Yeah. I can imagine if a person signs up and enables everything and updates immediately to everything then it’s a great experience. But nobody’s considering the corner cases where people don’t go all in on every thing Apple releases, and a lot of those corner cases are broken.

                                                                                                            2. 3

                                                                                                              No, I think my complaints fall into two categories.

                                                                                                              First, general software bugs, like the update problem.

                                                                                                              My second complaint isn’t necessarily with their services, but with how they integrate those services into iOs and OSX. iCloud and Apple music may be great services, but it feels like Apple is trying to bully me into using them by shoving them in my face every 5 seconds asking me to log in or whatever. If I say “No” the first time, they should respect it. They could at least wait a day or something instead of literally asking 5 seconds later. I can post a video; it’s literally 5-10 seconds apart between prompting for my iCloud login.

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                                                                                                                The update problem is because the same cloud infrastructure that does such a poor job with the various App Stores is reused for software updates. And yes, there’s a definite strategy tax issue with the way that the services have been shoe-horned into other software.

                                                                                                                But I find the underlying software to be pretty good, and in some places, excellent. Full disclosure, of course, is that I used to work there.

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                                                                                                              At least with Apple Music, you can turn it off in settings (via Settings > Music > Show Apple Music).

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                                                                                                              One comment I saw last time I saw this posted, was that Knuth’s code was written to explain literate programming, and not to solve the problem. That is to say, in introductory CS classes programs are written using methodologies and techniques unnecessary for the scale of the problem for the purpose of teaching the technique, not how to solve the problem, and Knuth is doing the same.

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                                                                                                                That claim isn’t that convincing to me, because explaining literate programming wasn’t Knuth’s primary goal— writing TeX wasn’t some kind of toy classroom example to show off literate programming, but a completely new publishing system that solved a need he had.