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      Tk doesn’t implement accessibility APIs on any platform, which means it’s unusable for blind people with screen readers, and probably people with some other disabilities as well.

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        Most of the solutions here don’t support accessiblity APIs aside from Qt and GTK. Personally, I’ve looked into writing code for libatk and it looks like a literal nightmare.

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      Would someone care to explain as to exactly why this blew his mind? I do not understand Scheme enough to see/understand what is happening here.

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        A cons cell is like a tuple or two element list in other languages. The straightforward way to implement it in Javascript would be using arrays. However, you can use other types of containers.

        In the second case, the author is using closures to hold the values. Cons returns a function that has closed over the values a and b. It also takes a function as a parameter, applies it to the values a and b, and returns the result. This gives you a way to work with the elements in the cons cell. getFirst and getSecond pass in a function that extracts their respective element.

        Does that make sense?

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          Yes, more or less, I now understand the significance a bit better as how this would blow someones mind. Thank you for explaining!

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            Awesome! Glad it was useful.

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        My main personal site is https://j11g.com (a numeronym of my name). It’s hosted on my VPS (which has more sites) with Wordpress.

        I picked Wordpress in 2005 for my other (Dutch) blog: https://piks.nl and that was the right choice at the time, so when I started j11g.com a couple of years ago I briefly looked at alternatives/static site generators, but I just love Wordpress (and the Independent Publisher template I use for both sites).

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          Paper.

          I wrote about it yesterday: https://j11g.com/2020/01/02/the-perfect-notebook/

          • It’s harder to edit
          • Less distraction
          • Always available
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            I appreciate all of your points about paper. Where it falls down for me is:

            • It is extremely cumbersome to copy/paste from/to my terminal
            • I like hyperlinks
            • Searching through a paper notebook is extremely slow if you’re looking for something you’ve not indexed
            • My penmanship is terrible

            I don’t have a system I love, currently. My current experiment is a small notebook that I carry when not online, and a directory full of markdown files named with dates. I transfer from the paper to the markdown irregularly when I feel I’ve captured something I’m likely to want later.

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              That’s actually not a bad hybrid solution! I find journaling valuable, for the sake of journaling itself, but there is indeed of course no reason I couldn’t transfer the so called captures, which are in my case mostly (valuable) byproducts of journaling to a computer.

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                My biggest hangup on paper is the inability to easily back it up. If I lose/forget a notebook, that’s a lot of data… just gone.

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              I think this is getting spam-voted because it’s from functional.christmas, and the only other posts from that site were submitted by a voting ring. But @j11g isn’t part of that ring! He’s submitting it because he genuinely thinks this article is worth sharing.

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                Uh? I was not aware of a ‘voting ring’ (whatever that is), I picked this link out of my RSS feed. Seemed interesting enough.

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                  Check the mod logs around dec 4: bunch of people were posting their stuff from functional Christmas and upvoting each other. I think people spam voted this because they associated “fc = spam”, which is why I’m saying you have nothing to do with that

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                “IRC is over 20 years old” actually, already over 30 years!

                (Yes, even when this blog was originally published.)

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                  The Soul of a New Machine (1981). It’s a great story about a team building a highly complex product (a computer). So it touches a lot of subjects: teams, management, engineering, programming.

                  I blogged about it once: https://j11g.com/2018/01/06/soul-new-machine-tracy-kidder/

                  Also:

                  • Hackers by Steven Levy (1984)
                  • Innovators by Walter Isaacson (2014: more recent but a great overview of computer history)
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                    One more in the same vein:

                    What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry, by John Markoff (2005)

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                    That is pretty cool! I think he sums it up nicely in point 4: “and just keep on keeping on.”

                    I did not know his blog, but have added it to my RSS reader.

                    But there is still room some for improvement I think (hyper personal preferences):

                    • click the header to go to the homepage (I find it disorienting not being to go to the “start”)
                    • search bar (such a rich/deep/old site should have a search bar!)
                    • where are the tags he speaks of (or are those private)?
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                      1. Click the header to the homepage—okay, got me there. I just never thought of doing that. I do have navigation links below the article, and if you have the right extension, I also have navigation style links in the head section (<link rel="">) that could be shown (I’ve used several such extensions in the past, but Firefox keeps changing how things work and extensions break––sigh).

                      2. I never got around to writing (or installing) a local search engine. At one point, I had a search bar that pointed to Google to search only my site, until Google dropped that support. Then I used several others until they too, went away. Nowadays, what with the “encrypt-all-the-thangs” battle cry, such a field would give dire security warnings because I don’t have HTTPS (I know the arguments, and some of them even make sense, but I still dislike it [1]).

                      3. They’re private for the most part. I did use them at one point when I had a sidebar of Amazon affiliate links—I would use a random tag from the top post to populate links from Amazon, but (and I hope you see the trend here) they dropped support for that (and changed what formats the links would appear as, and it no longer fit it to the site).

                      [1] I think it raises the bar for self-hosting websites and makes people less inclined to even think of hosting their own stuff. I only do it because I got into ISP/website hosting/development way back in the 90s and have run my own server since 1998 (I even handle my own email) but if I were to start from scratch today, I doubt I would even think twice about doing it. I find that troubling.

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                        1. Ha, I see.
                        2. I understand what you’re saying about HTTPS, even though LetsEncrypt did significantly lower the bar (still not low enough though).
                        3. That’s a shame, I was looking forward to clicking through “Unix administration” tags or what have you :)
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                          Heh. I do have a few entries under “Unix administration” but most of them are me bitching about administrating Unix boxes (I prefer development and was only a Unix administrator under duress [1]). Most of the rants I have about administration are under the tag “control panels” (which I deeply hate).

                          [1] Until we hired an actual Unix administrator and I switch to doing network administration under duress. It wasn’t nearly as bad. Now I get to do just development.

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                      Yes! Looking forward to seeing what solutions people come up with this year. I wrote a little bit about it last year.

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                        I’ll be scanning the barcode/ISBN/EAN of my books (~200 left) with an iOS shortcut that calls a URL with this scanned ISBN/EAN number, and uses it to pull the book data from the Bol.com API and from there add the book (and its details/image) to my personal book collection. As described here: https://j11g.com/2019/11/16/foster-how-to-build-your-own-bookshelf-management-web-application/

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                          I was going to write my own library manager but then I discovered LibraryThing and it’s everything I ever wanted, except OSS.

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                          A new LIR would still be able to get a /24 (I got a /22 myself a few weeks ago as one of the last). But the regular process has ceased.

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                            Well…. you’d go in the queue… and might have to wait quite a while… and one /24 is not much, compared to the /22 you’d get upto this point.

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                            Would this validate a new lobste.rs tag? #raku?

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                              I think there needs to be some more submissions/interest before a new tag is considered. OTOH this is an offshoot to an existing tag so..

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                                Ha! That’s a funny coincidence, I am currently reading the Unicorn Project by Gene Kim (his latest) in my other tab. I’m about half way through and Rich Hickey and functional programming superiority have already been mentioned a few times, and this video explains why!

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                                  Anybody know the date of this blog/interview, is this recent?

                                  1. 2

                                    I did the interview with Michael a little over a month ago, so fairly recent.

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                                    I wrote a blog about my .vimrc with explanations/screenshot: https://j11g.com/2018/03/10/my-vim-setup/

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                                      Building a personal book collection/library website. Like Goodreads but self-hosted. I want my to own my own data.

                                      I have the backend ready: I use the bol.com API (large bookretailer) to search/find books and add them (and their details/ISBN/images etc.) to my collection/library/database. And from there I can manage whether I own, want, started reading or finished reading a particular book. When finished, I can write and add a small review to the book.

                                      The backend looks pretty crude, but it works. The frontend will present my library, status, wishlist and progress and should look a bit nicer.

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                                        I love people that share their love for their tools (related: on Windows it doesn’t get better than ShareX to do the same).

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                                          It’s still kind of mind-blowing that this one protocol, thought up by one guy was (is?) good for a quarter of all internet traffic: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2014/10/peek-inside-internets-favorite-file-sharing-network

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                                            You mean, the second-highest figure after HTTP, the other protocol thought up by one guy? ;)

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                                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertext_Transfer_Protocol

                                              Tim Berners-Lee and his team at CERN are credited with inventing the original HTTP

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                                                Yes! :) It’s wild.

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                                                  Graphics are big.