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    That is pretty cool! I think he sums it up nicely in point 4: “and just keep on keeping on.”

    I did not know his blog, but have added it to my RSS reader.

    But there is still room some for improvement I think (hyper personal preferences):

    • click the header to go to the homepage (I find it disorienting not being to go to the “start”)
    • search bar (such a rich/deep/old site should have a search bar!)
    • where are the tags he speaks of (or are those private)?
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      1. Click the header to the homepage—okay, got me there. I just never thought of doing that. I do have navigation links below the article, and if you have the right extension, I also have navigation style links in the head section (<link rel="">) that could be shown (I’ve used several such extensions in the past, but Firefox keeps changing how things work and extensions break––sigh).

      2. I never got around to writing (or installing) a local search engine. At one point, I had a search bar that pointed to Google to search only my site, until Google dropped that support. Then I used several others until they too, went away. Nowadays, what with the “encrypt-all-the-thangs” battle cry, such a field would give dire security warnings because I don’t have HTTPS (I know the arguments, and some of them even make sense, but I still dislike it [1]).

      3. They’re private for the most part. I did use them at one point when I had a sidebar of Amazon affiliate links—I would use a random tag from the top post to populate links from Amazon, but (and I hope you see the trend here) they dropped support for that (and changed what formats the links would appear as, and it no longer fit it to the site).

      [1] I think it raises the bar for self-hosting websites and makes people less inclined to even think of hosting their own stuff. I only do it because I got into ISP/website hosting/development way back in the 90s and have run my own server since 1998 (I even handle my own email) but if I were to start from scratch today, I doubt I would even think twice about doing it. I find that troubling.

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        1. Ha, I see.
        2. I understand what you’re saying about HTTPS, even though LetsEncrypt did significantly lower the bar (still not low enough though).
        3. That’s a shame, I was looking forward to clicking through “Unix administration” tags or what have you :)
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          Heh. I do have a few entries under “Unix administration” but most of them are me bitching about administrating Unix boxes (I prefer development and was only a Unix administrator under duress [1]). Most of the rants I have about administration are under the tag “control panels” (which I deeply hate).

          [1] Until we hired an actual Unix administrator and I switch to doing network administration under duress. It wasn’t nearly as bad. Now I get to do just development.

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      Yes! Looking forward to seeing what solutions people come up with this year. I wrote a little bit about it last year.

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        I’ll be scanning the barcode/ISBN/EAN of my books (~200 left) with an iOS shortcut that calls a URL with this scanned ISBN/EAN number, and uses it to pull the book data from the Bol.com API and from there add the book (and its details/image) to my personal book collection. As described here: https://j11g.com/2019/11/16/foster-how-to-build-your-own-bookshelf-management-web-application/

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          I was going to write my own library manager but then I discovered LibraryThing and it’s everything I ever wanted, except OSS.

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          A new LIR would still be able to get a /24 (I got a /22 myself a few weeks ago as one of the last). But the regular process has ceased.

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            Well…. you’d go in the queue… and might have to wait quite a while… and one /24 is not much, compared to the /22 you’d get upto this point.

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            Would this validate a new lobste.rs tag? #raku?

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              I think there needs to be some more submissions/interest before a new tag is considered. OTOH this is an offshoot to an existing tag so..

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                Ha! That’s a funny coincidence, I am currently reading the Unicorn Project by Gene Kim (his latest) in my other tab. I’m about half way through and Rich Hickey and functional programming superiority have already been mentioned a few times, and this video explains why!

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                  Anybody know the date of this blog/interview, is this recent?

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                    I did the interview with Michael a little over a month ago, so fairly recent.

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                    I wrote a blog about my .vimrc with explanations/screenshot: https://j11g.com/2018/03/10/my-vim-setup/

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                      Building a personal book collection/library website. Like Goodreads but self-hosted. I want my to own my own data.

                      I have the backend ready: I use the bol.com API (large bookretailer) to search/find books and add them (and their details/ISBN/images etc.) to my collection/library/database. And from there I can manage whether I own, want, started reading or finished reading a particular book. When finished, I can write and add a small review to the book.

                      The backend looks pretty crude, but it works. The frontend will present my library, status, wishlist and progress and should look a bit nicer.

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                        I love people that share their love for their tools (related: on Windows it doesn’t get better than ShareX to do the same).

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                          It’s still kind of mind-blowing that this one protocol, thought up by one guy was (is?) good for a quarter of all internet traffic: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2014/10/peek-inside-internets-favorite-file-sharing-network

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                            You mean, the second-highest figure after HTTP, the other protocol thought up by one guy? ;)

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                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertext_Transfer_Protocol

                              Tim Berners-Lee and his team at CERN are credited with inventing the original HTTP

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                                Yes! :) It’s wild.

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                                  Graphics are big.

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                                Eating the world considered harmful.

                                Mercurial seems to have a lot of sentimental support — being the saner and more intuitive DVCS

                                This is one of those things that’s just repeated over and over and over and assumed to be true. Kind of like “Vim HEAD runs on Windows 95 (and OS/2)!” was assumed to be true in 2013 (spoiler: no one actually tried).

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                                  This is one of those things that’s just repeated over and over and over and assumed to be true.

                                  For the most part it is definitely true. The git command line is notoriously inconsistent, whereas hg is not. It’s also harder to shoot yourself in the foot with hg.

                                  The one thing that (IMO) is a mess with hg is branching, which day to day has far more impact than remembering an inconsistent command interface. At a previous employer (who I’d convinced to move to hg from svn) we ended up with a horribly complex bookmarking strategy to deal with short-lived feature branches.

                                  I’m marginally sad that hg is losing, because it got some things very right. But git on the whole gets more of the things that matter right, despite the warts.

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                                    The command line is only one part of it, though.

                                    Conceptually, I find git much easier to understand. I “get it” that it’s a DAG and I can create branches, name them, push them, switch between them, etc. Maybe the command line is obtuse, but nowadays I just use magit anyway.

                                    I spent almost 6 years using Mercurial at a previous job, and never really understood stuff like branching. To be fair, Kiln’s weird forking/branching didn’t help, but it was only part of a bigger problem.

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                                      It’s also harder to shoot yourself in the foot with hg.

                                      My intention is not to put words in your mouth, but IME the Git footguns are somewhat exaggerated.

                                      Yes, you can squash into a merge commit and mess up the parentage vis a vis the remote, and make other messes, but Git also comes with great recover tools.

                                      If you manage to make a mess, you can clean it up by cherry-picking into a temp branch and resetting your mess to that --hard. In other instances the reflog can be useful.

                                      Also not saying a rebase pulling in commits from reflog is Git 101, and many people may just rebuild the commits from their editor’s undo buffer, or from memory.

                                      I am saying that every argument wrt footguns should come with the note that you should tag backups of your state before a risky endeavor, and that recovery is possible.

                                      Personally I’ve had only a fistful of real messes (mainly accidents made so tired I should not have been working) during my maybe 10-12 years of Git usage, and remembering the recovery strategies, I can’t remember once rebuilding the commits.

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                                        Just because git gives you the tools to fix the issue, doesn’t mean that the initial mistake is less likely.

                                        It’s been a while since I used hg in anger, but from memory there’s no real way to accidentally merge the wrong remote branch into your local branch (because in general you push/pull the whole repo, so the concept of ‘remote branch’ doesn’t really exist). I’ve done this a ton of times with git, simply through muscle memory.

                                        Sure, it’s not a catastrophic mistake, but it’s still one that git allows you to make.

                                        As I said, I’m in the git camp. Recently I had to merge multiple repos into one, taking only one branch from each, and retaining the history. It was surprisingly painless in git (thanks to merge --allow-unrelated-histories). I’m not sure how it would have gone with hg, but I assume it would have been a lot more painful.

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                                          I’ve had one moment of panic with git. That was when I did git reset --hard on a file after editing it and then remembering I needed those changes. But then I remembered that I had added the changes to the index, and was able to recover them by looking at the dangling objects there.

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                                        Author here: this is the main argument I got from Mercurial users (scrolling through the comments). I use Git myself (and only glanced at Mercurial and have no opinion on it). So maybe my sentence (wrongly) implies that I think this, but I mean to say that Mercurial users tend to give this argument.

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                                          I’ve used a variety of VCS over the years, including both git & hg, the latter of which has always felt easier to use than the former - not so much because hg is particularly easy but because git is particularly confusing. It’s kinda like how Linus’ other major project was for many years until Ubuntu decided to make it easier to use.

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                                        Interesting! On a side note: when I find a ‘good’ link (from Twitter or my RSS feed) I usually also crosspost to HN en LO.

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                                          I would LOVE to see the original response/e-mails, especially Knuths’ since it is well known he does not use e-mail anymore (was it a letter, was it e-mail by an assistant etc.?)

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                                            Good point. They are all interesting. Knuth’s was great (b/c like you said, he prefers snail mail). I’ll update the repo this weekend with those.

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                                            Thank you for the upvoted comments/stories links!! This was really missing from lobste.rs.

                                            Also, happy birthday!

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                                              How are they doing this? (serious question) or is other hardware seriously overpriced?

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                                                The Raspberry Pi foundation is a nonprofit, and I suspect the margins are quite slim. They probably make more selling the accessories. They also have tremendous volume and that helps keep the prices down.

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                                                  It wouldnt surprise me because that’s how it works in the cell phone shops, too. Sales people in many tell me most of their commissions come from cases.

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                                                  Well, the 35 dollars is before shipping/tax/other things and the 35 dollars is the cheapest model, 1GB ram, others cost more, so maybe the make the cheapest one at more of a loss. Other than that, I am not sure.

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                                                    I think at least some of the original Raspberry Pi founders were also Broadcom employees, and RasPi boards are all built around Broadcom hardware. I’m guessing there was a lot of consensus-building within Broadcom leading up to the original RasPi’s release… it would be much more difficult to approach an SoC vendor as an external third-party and try to talk them into giving you the same open documentation and design support that RasPi gets from Broadcom.

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                                                    One benefit of using a CMS or site generator is an automatic RSS feed. Hint: this blog currently has no RSS feed ;)

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                                                      I was really considering writing a blog that actually uses an RSS feed as the source of truth, then uses XSLT to generate the HTML…

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                                                        Pro tip: use an Atom feed. RSS 2.0 is pretty loose, spec wise.

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                                                          This brings back old memories. Back in 2006, I think, I used a CMS called Symphony that would generate XML and then you’d style your blog using XSLT. Since I was a junior developer back then, it was quite handy to learn XML and XSLT, which were still the rage back then :-)

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                                                          That is very true, but I’m working on a shell script to generate a feed from HTML.

                                                          Edit: Here’s a preliminary version of the script (results).

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                                                            Be careful your shell script doesn’t turn into a static site generator!

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                                                              Indeed! I saw it coming too, so now I’ve switched to a PHP script (feed.php) that generates it on the server from my index.html, so that I don’t have to worry about generating it :-)

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                                                          My plans:

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                                                            Which specific book is that?

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                                                              Looking into The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing. I wanted to learn more about investing but financial topics do not interest me much. I was happy to learn there is such thing as passive investment, which involves level of engagement that I am ready to accept (surfing numbers, revenues, news etc. all the time is not my definition of meaningful life).