1. 1

    Interesting! On a side note: when I find a ‘good’ link (from Twitter or my RSS feed) I usually also crosspost to HN en LO.

    1. 2

      I would LOVE to see the original response/e-mails, especially Knuths’ since it is well known he does not use e-mail anymore (was it a letter, was it e-mail by an assistant etc.?)

      1. 2

        Good point. They are all interesting. Knuth’s was great (b/c like you said, he prefers snail mail). I’ll update the repo this weekend with those.

      1. 1

        Thank you for the upvoted comments/stories links!! This was really missing from lobste.rs.

        Also, happy birthday!

        1. 5

          How are they doing this? (serious question) or is other hardware seriously overpriced?

          1. 6

            The Raspberry Pi foundation is a nonprofit, and I suspect the margins are quite slim. They probably make more selling the accessories. They also have tremendous volume and that helps keep the prices down.

            1. 1

              It wouldnt surprise me because that’s how it works in the cell phone shops, too. Sales people in many tell me most of their commissions come from cases.

            2. 5

              Well, the 35 dollars is before shipping/tax/other things and the 35 dollars is the cheapest model, 1GB ram, others cost more, so maybe the make the cheapest one at more of a loss. Other than that, I am not sure.

              1. 2

                I think at least some of the original Raspberry Pi founders were also Broadcom employees, and RasPi boards are all built around Broadcom hardware. I’m guessing there was a lot of consensus-building within Broadcom leading up to the original RasPi’s release… it would be much more difficult to approach an SoC vendor as an external third-party and try to talk them into giving you the same open documentation and design support that RasPi gets from Broadcom.

              1. 16

                One benefit of using a CMS or site generator is an automatic RSS feed. Hint: this blog currently has no RSS feed ;)

                1. 5

                  I was really considering writing a blog that actually uses an RSS feed as the source of truth, then uses XSLT to generate the HTML…

                  1. 6

                    Pro tip: use an Atom feed. RSS 2.0 is pretty loose, spec wise.

                    1. 1

                      This brings back old memories. Back in 2006, I think, I used a CMS called Symphony that would generate XML and then you’d style your blog using XSLT. Since I was a junior developer back then, it was quite handy to learn XML and XSLT, which were still the rage back then :-)

                    2. 2

                      That is very true, but I’m working on a shell script to generate a feed from HTML.

                      Edit: Here’s a preliminary version of the script (results).

                      1. 3

                        Be careful your shell script doesn’t turn into a static site generator!

                        1. 1

                          Indeed! I saw it coming too, so now I’ve switched to a PHP script (feed.php) that generates it on the server from my index.html, so that I don’t have to worry about generating it :-)

                    1. 4

                      My plans:

                      1. 1

                        Which specific book is that?

                        1. 2

                          Looking into The Bogleheads’ Guide to Investing. I wanted to learn more about investing but financial topics do not interest me much. I was happy to learn there is such thing as passive investment, which involves level of engagement that I am ready to accept (surfing numbers, revenues, news etc. all the time is not my definition of meaningful life).

                      1. 7

                        On this subject: I can definitely recommend ‘Why We Sleep’ by Matthew Walker (I noticed he is also referenced in this paper a couple of times).

                        1. 1

                          Seconded. I recently watched Joe Rogan Experience #1109 - Matthew Walker and found it very interesting.

                        1. 1

                          I think it was supposed to be this: https://kk.org/thetechnium/data-manifesto/

                          1. 1

                            Yes I messed up the link…

                          1. 21

                            I only recently came across his Twitter account and started following him (he had some interesting ideas about and experiments with TiddlyWiki). He seemed like a passionate and enthusiastic technology lover, which was a good enough reason to follow him.

                            And it is only just a few minutes ago that I discovered that Joe is the guy with the moustache from the famous Erlang: The Movie video…. I had not pieced those two things together.

                            So I knew nothing about his history, just one little thing he was working on/interested in. That may make me seem ignorant, but I share this because it goes to show that the light that shines in people like Joe was a genuine light of curiosity and sharing. Bright enough to attract people like me.

                            1. 4

                              I started using TiddlyWiki because of his enthusiastic posts on it, and I have to say I’m incredibly happy with it. It’s great to be able to own your own knowledge repository, and to be able to tag things appropriately to distill versions of the TiddlyWiki that you may want to share in certain venues.

                              1. 1

                                Do you have any suggestions for using tiddlywiki on mobile?

                                The save workflow is already pretty terrible now on modern browsers, and I never figured out syncing. I really liked the idea of it, and am always curious how people use it.

                            1. 2

                              Not sure if this is the right place for this request: but I would like to be able to see top posts for a specific period on lobste.rs. Would be this be terribly difficult to add as a feature?

                              1. 1

                                As far as I understand it the top posts (i.e., hottest) are calculated using ephemeral data. I’m not aware of any mechanism that saves or archives them. What you’re asking about here would need more specificity (elaborating on where and how the history of top posts would be displayed and why that feature benefits users while not imposing any undue burden on those who don’t use it.) before knowing whether it is worth having. As to difficulty: we don’t do feature requests without working code. Whether something is difficult is in part determined by the skill and motivation of the person making the pull-request. You’ll have to answer your own question.

                                What’s your use case for this?

                                1. 1

                                  I want to see the top posts (so most upvoted?) for a 24 hour period/week/month/all-time. This is how I browse most subreddits. Say, you visit once a week: with two clicks you can see the most upvoted (and interesting?) submissions. HN has this same feature, but sparsely implemented: https://news.ycombinator.com/best

                                  1. 4

                                    https://lobste.rs/top/24h https://lobste.rs/top/1w https://lobste.rs/top/1m https://lobste.rs/top/8y

                                    Syntax defined in app/helpers/interval_helper.rb, used in HomeController#top. No feature to get older time periods, but you could open a PR.

                                    1. 1

                                      This is amazing! Exactly what I was looking for, but I couldn’t find it. Thanks!

                              1. 1

                                Congrats! I’ll be trying to attend the next Austin Rust Meetup, if I don’t have a meeting at the same time (and if I can figure out how to get into the building this time), so maybe we’ll have a chance to meet.

                                1. 1

                                  I’m submitted the link, but I am not Steve :)

                                1. 3

                                  Sort of on topic: someone (I don’t know who, but I like it) aggregates a bunch of lobste.rs users’ blogs here: https://crustaceans.hmmz.org I check it out every now and then.

                                  1. 13

                                    I was confused for a second there, but this is different from the PuTTY clone named KiTTY (http://www.9bis.net/kitty/)

                                    1. 1

                                      The following books are piled up on my bedside table (in queue so to speak):

                                      • Faith - Jimmy Carter (currently reading)
                                      • Leonardo da Vinci - Walter Isaacson
                                      • Where Wizards Stay up Late - Hafner & Lyon
                                      • Joy Division and the Making of Unknown Pleasures - Jake Kennedy
                                      • Everything is Illuminated - Jonathan Safran Foer
                                      • The Sun also Rises - Hemingway
                                      • Morrissey - David Brett
                                      • Hackers and Painters - Paul Graham

                                      Want to buy/read, because people keep recommending them:

                                      • How the Internet Happened - Brian McCullough
                                      • Bad Blood - John Carreyrou
                                      • American Kingpin - Nick Bilton
                                      1. 1
                                        1. 2

                                          This post has been said in various forms for a while now, granted this doesn’t make it any less true. That said, the title could provide more information rather than going for poetic effect.

                                          What comes to mind is the bleak UI experience of keyboard and mouse. Another point that has been said time and time again: It’s amazing how quickly and expressively we can put information on paper, and while some tablets might approach this in a similar style, it definitely seems that there is room to grow - I love seeing experimental UIs (in non-critical softwate of course) and creative attempts to allow us to interact more easily with our (esp. desktop/laptop) devices.

                                          1. 2

                                            You are right about the title. I changed it, thanks!

                                            You are also right about this same idea being said in various forms before. However this year I made a realization that some things which are obvious to me, may not be obvious to other people and it does not hurt to reiterate. This post is a direct result of that thought.

                                            About the bland UI experience: that is indeed another aspect where paper trumps computers (for now)!

                                          1. 3

                                            Yesterday I finished reading Inside Apple by Adam Lashinsky and started reading The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead. Also, last week, I picked up a second hand copy of the classic wizard book: Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, which I’m browsing trough at work, the book is also available for free online. And yesterday the official Red Dead Redemption 2 guide came in the mail, which I am excited about (not so much reading as reviewing, since I already finished the game).

                                            1. 2

                                              Off topic: what is the reasoning behind the URL setup? I am redirected to https://https.www.google.com.tedunangst.com (which has a valid certificate). I tried finding a post on there explaining why or how it is set up like that, but couldn’t find it, but seems there’s a story here?

                                              1. 3

                                                It’s just a subdomain, tedu hosts his own CA on the main site (view the certificate on the main non-redirecting site and you can see it’s signed by ‘ca.teduangst.com’). My guess is he got annoyed at everyone telling him that his cert was invalid and hosted a trolly subdomain to equally confuse people and maybe get crawlers to play nice.

                                                1. 2

                                                  I solved the very first challenge with a simple AWK one-liner.

                                                  I suspect many of us had the same approach here :)

                                                  1. 3

                                                    awk ‘{total += $1} END {print total}’ adv1.txt ;)

                                                    1. 2

                                                      This is almost exactly what I had, but after doing some of the other puzzles I realised I am not very smart and I should just lean on Haskell for everything.

                                                      1. 1
                                                        awk '{c+=$1} END {print c}' day1.input
                                                        awk '{c+=$1; if (c in seen) { print c; exit 0} else seen[c]=1}' <(while cat day1.input; do :; done)
                                                        

                                                        ;)

                                                      2. 2

                                                        I suspect many of us had the same approach here :)

                                                        I don’t know what others think, but until now every puzzle seemed to be most comfortably solved in AWK. It’s a bit sad because I wanted to use a new language each day, but lack of time forces me to be lazy :(

                                                        Update: just in: day 3, part 2 didn’t even take a minute ^^

                                                        1. 2

                                                          I don’t think it’s so sad. For me at least, it makes the case that all programmers should know AWK.

                                                          1. 1

                                                            Huh. We must have thought very differently about day 3, part 2. How did you do it? (I did a very “mathematiciany” approach where I generated the coordinates each box would touch, then put those in a map of those coordinates to a list of IDs, and did the set difference of all IDs with the lists that had more than one element. Hugely wasteful in CPU terms, just fine in brain terms.)

                                                            1. 2

                                                              (spoiler: this was my script): I read in the file twice, first time counting how often each x y coordinate was requested, filling up a 2D map (AWK’s pseudo-arrays), and the second time going through all the lines again, looking for any request that only had 1’s in the map, then printed that out. Not pretty, but it was easy to extend my first solution to work with it.

                                                              What language did you use, if I may ask?

                                                              1. 2

                                                                Nice. I guess that’s pretty similar to what I did.

                                                                What language did you use, if I may ask?

                                                                Python. I’m brushing up on it for a job I’m starting in January, otherwise I think I’d have tried something lispy: https://github.com/gunnihinn/advent-2018/blob/master/day03b.py