Threads for jamesmd

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    I know this isn’t that big of a deal but it is a little upsetting…

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        This is really cool! I have a spare iphone 7 somewhere…. I might give it a try tonight

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          I have a few SBC’s to review for my blog although we have snow here today, if its still snowy tomorrow I’ll be outside playing haha.

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            👋 it’s a great device! I’m using it as a gateway for my homelab now, more than enough performance for what I need.

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              Does this do usb gadget? This looks like it might fit in a keyboard.

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                It does! Some guy used the same SOC to make a Linux powered business card running usb gadget.

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                How is the board powered when the micro-USB is used for ethernet?

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                  Just over the 5v gpio pin

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                  Probably, but it’d be silly.

                  These are designed for tasks where it does make sense to run a RTOS, not some unreliable, laggy, bloated Linux.

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                    Here’s a handkerchief; wipe that froth off your mouth. ;-)

                    With an ARM9 and 512MB RAM, this is in a class above the microcontrollers I’ve seen that you’d use an RTOS with. (Probably in power draw, too.) Heck, you’ve got a full MMU in there, which you don’t find on your Cortex Ms or ESP32s.

                    Maybe Linux isn’t your ideal OS for this, but there are probably ARM builds of some of the microkernel based OSs that would work…

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                      wipe that froth off your mouth.

                      I swear I held back.

                      With an ARM9 and 512MB RAM

                      32MB RAM and 16MB storage.

                      Maybe Linux isn’t your ideal OS for this

                      Correct.

                      some of the microkernel based OSs

                      That’s indeed reasonable.

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                        Maybe Linux isn’t your ideal OS for this

                        Keep in mind that these were specifically designed to run Linux and ship with a Linux image on the onboard flash.

                        They are not however designed to run a full fledged Linux Disto like Debian although it runs fine.

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                          Keep in mind that these were specifically designed to run Linux

                          Seriously?

                          Let’s say I’m willing to accept that, somehow, the board designers only put 32MB RAM on a recent board destined to run Linux.

                          But then, why is there a RT-Thread logo on the board?

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                            Good question on the logo, presumably it is supported but trust me when I say this was designed to run Linux, it really was.

                            https://www.seeedstudio.com/Sipeed-Lichee-Nano-Linux-Development-Board-16M-Flash-WiFi-Version-p-2893.html

                            Edit: rt-thread is supported although the spi flash versions of these boards ship with Linux.

                            Software and development environment Support 3.10 BSP linux, Support 4.19 mainline linux, Support xboot bare metal development >environment Support RT-Thread

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                              Whole deal is, to me, reminiscent of some laptops shipping with FreeDOS.

                              It’s better than shipping them without an OS, but the expectation is that, once aware that the hardware works, the user will install a system fitting whatever purpose the user has in mind.

                              Yet of course, unsurprisingly, there’s going to be a few odd people that will actually use FreeDOS on these laptops.

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                          Oops, I was looking at a bunch of other tiny computers and got the RAM mixed up. But even 32MB is luxurious compared to most embedded devices! Plus, with an MMU you can use virtual memory.

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                            Plus, with an MMU you can use virtual memory.

                            If by virtual memory you mean swap, do note that using swap does automatically make the system non-deterministic.

                            But then again, you could argue Linux is non-deterministic to begin with.

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                              You say “non-deterministic” like it’s an insult. You’re aware that the computer you typed that comment on is non-deterministic, right?

                              If you want a deterministic device, there are plenty of dinky MCUs to choose from. This isn’t one of them. Doesn’t make it bad.

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                                As in every process gets it’s own virtual memory space.

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                          It runs Debian just fine, yes its a little bloated but using 7MB RAM at idle its not too bad.

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                            With “running X on Y” blog posts, silly is usually the point. NetBSD on toaster, DOOM on printer, etc :)

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                            Thanks for sharing my post :)

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                              Saw it in the rss feed and liked it! I wonder if I could get a stock regular pc debian install to use <32 mb ram…

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                                Easily! Without X running and a bare install it should use around 7MB. Running Debian inside a container is even lighter. I’ve seen Debian OpenVZ VM’s and LXC containers using under 10MB RAM with a web server running.

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                              How do you deal with multiple A records (like https://raymii.org) or / and IPv6?

                              Edit: is it open source?

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                                IPV6 is Supported, if its round robin DNS they will all be checked but it will be fairly random.

                                It’s not currently open source and I can’t see myself opening it up any time soon. It’s such a simple project to build I’d rather point someone in the right direction on how to get started than see clones pop up all over the web.

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                                It seems that (some) URL validation is missing, at least http:/website.com (malformed scheme) is passing.

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                                  I think you’re right, I’ll fix that

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                                  Neat at first glance!

                                  Only nitpick so far is that the page scrolls a bit left/right on Firefox (with disqus blocked by umatrix). Disabling the margin-{left,right}: -15px; CSS on the footer fixes that.

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                                    Thanks! I’ll fix the styling issue, I do plan on making a new non bootstrap front end

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                                    ironically it thinks its own site is down…

                                    https://isitup.site/isitup.site/

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                                      That’s by design haha!

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                                      How often do you ping websites to gather statistics?

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                                        Every minute, it only does a head request to get the response code so it’s pretty lightweight.

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                                        4GB RAM and SATA port and these little beasts could handle casual daily work without any issues - web browsing, libreoffice/google docs, some games (via Android).

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                                          The nanoPC T4 has exactly this although no SATA - This is replaced with an M.2 slot.

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                                            So even better. m.2 to pcie 4x raiser and you can get rtx2080 on board :)

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                                              Haha you could! I wonder if there are ARM drivers, this could be an interesting project!

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                                          This is likely the last CPU Architecture to be added to mainline Linux.

                                          Why?

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                                            it’s a statement made by Linus Torvalds referring to how, since RISC-V is very open, then it’s likely everyone will prefer using it instead of making their own thing.

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                                                A world in which we can’t keep reinventing the wheel would be a sad one indeed.

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                                                  Nothing is stopping you reinventing any wheels here.

                                                  This is just a statement about the economics of designing and taping out your own new CPU architecture, producing documentation, compilers, and all OS and tooling support…does doing this help you widen your moat?

                                                  Seems the current mix of ARM/MIPS/RISC-V quality and licensing options makes doing all the above a needless resource sink and distraction for companies of all shapes and sizes.

                                                  For those hobbyists still wanting to dabble in this, fortunately in recent years, FPGA kit has come to a price point that is within reach of most of our wallets.

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                                                You got this dead on! Theres several reasons but the main one is that its just not worth creating a new ISA for every application, ARM and RISC-V can cover the majority of applications.

                                                C-SKY was partially created because the Chinese wanted their own Architecture.