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    If only they had an iOS version. I loved K-9 when I was primarily an Android user. iOS Mail just can’t keep up.

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      iOS Mail is a truly awful mail client, yet macOS mail is probably my favourite mail client. As far as I know, the same team is responsible for both at Apple. I have no idea how it ended up in this state.

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        I agree, also loved K-9 when I was on Android. Have you had a chance to experiment with iOS clients by any chance? Haven’t found anything that quite works as well, stuck on the default Mail app…

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        10.15.2 seems decent. I still see some occasional beachballs with Touchbar integration on Preview and QuickTime, but that’s about it.

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          I have one machine running it, and I’ve been surprised by how many apps aren’t supported on Catalina. I have a ScanSnap S1300, the support apps for it don’t run on Catalina and Fujitsu isn’t updating them. I had a Drobo FS unit, and its software doesn’t run on Catalina. Meanwhile I have a perfectly good 2011 iMac that can’t run 10.14 or 10.15 thanks to Apple’s eff you at users with their “sorry, we won’t let you install our OS on your old hardware, we’re done issuing updates, and I guess you better just throw it in the trash.”

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            As long as you bought a new device, it looks like Apple’s approach worked.

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              I didn’t, exactly. I picked up a 2015 MBP from a cow-orker. I slapped a 1TB SSD in it when I bought it and then went ahead and went straight to Catalina. And at this point, the odds of me buying a new Mac or even a refurb or second-hand Mac are pretty slim.

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              A 2011 iMac is almost ten years old. Apple can’t support legacy hardware forever. Even MS gives about six years for their mainstream server OS support. If Apple offered an extended release type offering outside of their Alliance stuff, I suspect most users wouldn’t want to pay for it.

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              I think the better question is why GitHub/GitLab offer your SSH public keys to anyone that asks. Yes, this openness is the model for PGP - but you can’t do the same kind of enumeration with PGP public keys. I don’t know about the rest of you, but I don’t make my public SSH keys freely available.

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                For me, it was more watching people "curl http://... | sudo sh" in large coffee shops with plenty of evil twins present. At least if you’re pulling down an archive or getting something from git, TLS was usually involved. I’d see some sites try to fix this by adding -L to their curl instructions to handle the redirect to HTTPS, but why not just have the HTTPS link there in the first place?